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THE FORUM 



Catering . . . 

Weddings "™ DIETRICH'S, 

OUR SPECIALTY 1015 N. Third Street. 225 Market Street. 

Fancy Ices, Cakes, Confections Harrisburg, Pa. 

Shipped Anywhere. Correspondence Solicited. 



flniwille Electric Ogbt 
Company 

Electric Light Electric Wiring 

Electrical Supplies 

ol every description 

ANNVILLE, / * PA, 

Dr. Harry Zimmerman 
Dentist 

Reductions to Students 
72 West Main St., Annville, Pa. 

JOSEPH MILLER, 
Furniture and Undertaking, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

IF- BATDORF 

Dealer In 

Ladies' and Qents' 
Furnishings 
Main Street, ANNVILLE, PA. 

Harvey L. Seltzer 

(Formerly with Isaac Wolf) 
Strictly One-Price 

Clothier 

769 Cumberland St., LEBANON, PA- 



JNO. S. SHOPE 

Queensware 
Groceries Hardware 

LADIES' and GENTS' 

Furnishings 

Discount to Students? 

West Main St., Annville, Pa. 

JOSEPH G, KELCHNER 
Butcher 

Daily Meat Market of home dressed meats 

Also a full line of Smoked Meats. 
Annville, * ✓ Pa. 

W. G WOOLF 

Groceries and Provisions 

65 East Main St., ANNVILLE, PA 

Stephen Hubertis 

BOOK 
BINDER 

320 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 



Contents. 



Down Hill - 


73 


Bishop E. B. Kephart - 


74 


Remunerative Employment of Students 


7o 


None But the Brave Deserve the Fair 


- 78 


James Fennimore Cooper 


- 81 


Editorial - 


87 


Alumni Notes - 


90 


College Notes - 


90 


The Funeral of Bishop Kephart 


91 


Personals - 


93 


Resolutions .... 


93 


Basket Ball .... 


93 


Glee Club Concert ... 


95 


Exchange Notes 


96 



THE FORUM. 

Volume XIX. JANUARY, 1906. Number 4 

Down Hill 

Heigh ho ! 
Ah, do you know 
"Whither our flashing feet shall go ? 
Hoofs have you, and the hairy thigh, 
And a little brown wisp of a nymph am I. 
Down the forest, flickering by 
Low and high : 
Sing and cry 
Heigh ho ! 
Who ever could know 
Whither our bold brown feet shall go ? 
Hoofs bite well on the moss green stone; 
Small toes cling to the roots out-thrown; 
Quick hands catch at the light leaves blown 
Low and high. 
Sing and cry 
Heigh ho ! 
"Why should we know 
Whither our following feet shall go ? 
Slim tree bends like an Indian's bow; 
Brown bog curdles and creeps; heigh ho ! 
Leaf and petal and sun shape blow 
Low and high. 
Sing and cry 
Heigh ho ! 
Never to know 
Save that the hoofs and the brown feet go 
Under the close bough's blue-patched roof; 
Down the mountain, putting to proof 

Little brown foot and lean brown hoof — 
Low and high — 
Sing and cry 
Heigh ho ! 
Never to know — 
Only to go and go and go! 
Heigh ho ! 

— Smith Monthly 



74 



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Bishop £. B. Kephart 

Bishop Kzekiel B. Kephart was the second son of Henry Kephart, 
jr., and Sarah Goss and was the fifth child of a family of thirteen child- 
ren. He was born in Decatur township, Clearfield County, on Novem- 
ber 6, 1834. His father was a preacher in the church of the United 
Brethren Church and Bishop Kephart spent his boyhood days on a newly 
cleared farm on the western slope of the Allegheny Mountains. He be- 
gan to go to school at the age of seven and took advantage of the rather 
primative school facilities of those days. He also thoroughly read his 
father's scanty library which contained but few books. As a young man 
he was very careful in his choice of associates and always chose the pure 
and good in preference to the profane. 

He was converted in the fall of 1851 at the age of seventeen in the 
old Bradford meeting house near Woodland, Clearfield County and joined 
the United Brethren Church. Thus began a Christian experience which 
was to develop into one of the purest and greatest that our church has 
ever known. He early received complete assurance of a call to the 
Christian ministry and although discouraged by some of his friends, he 
answered the call and bent all his efforts towards the education necessary 
for the training for the ministry. 

In the winter of 1855 the future bishop went to public school and 
studied the ordinary branches under a competent teacher. In 1856 he 
entered Dickinson Seminary at Williamsport, where he was a student for 
a short time. He was forced to leave this institution because of a lack of 
money to carry on his studies. In April 1857, after teaching for a while, 
he entered Mount Pleasant College in the State. When that College 
was united with Otterbein University at Westerville, Ohio, with other 
students he entered that institution. His finances being exhausted he 
left college and entered the active ministry and was stationed at various 
points in the West for five years. Then he returned to Otterbein Uni- 
versity and graduated in the scientific course January 4, 1865. In 1870 
he completed the classical course at the same institution. 

Following his graduation in 1865, he spent one year as principal of 
Michigan Collegiate Institute at L,eoni, Mich., two years as pastor in 
Allegheny Conference and in August 1869 he was elected president of 



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75 



Western College, Toledo, Iowa where he served for thirteen years. He 
was a very successful college president and when he left the college it was 
free from debt he having cancelled a large indebtedness. While in Iowa 
he served four years in the State Senate of Iowa. While in the senate 
he helped to revise the entire code of Iowa. The present school law of 
that state was mainly shaped by him. He was a Republican and although 
a promising political future was before him he refused to serve any 
longer at the end of four years in the Senate, prefering the work of the 
ministry to that of politics. 

On May 19, 1881 at a general conference held at Iyisbon, Iowa, he 
was elected Bishop, being assigned to the Southwest. He served in this 
capacity until the last general conference held at Topeka, Kansas, in 
1905 when he declined to be re-elected. He was elected Bishop emeritus 
and has since spent the most of his time in Annville, where he has re- 
sided with his son-in-law, Prof. 1,. F. John on College Avenue. He 
died at Indianapolis Wednesday, January 24. 

He is survived by his widow who was Miss Susan J. Trefts and 
whom he married in i860, also by two daughters, Mrs. L,. F. John and 
Mrs. H. U. Roop. 

Bishop Kephart was widely known throughout the United Brethren 
Church. He traveled widely and in his trips abroad was an observant 
tourist. He was an f extensive writer upon religious and educational 
topics. His kindly disposition and attractive and inspiring personality 
caused him to be universally loved and respected. 



76 THE FORUM 

Remunerative Employment of Students 

O THE prospective but impecunious student entering college 
the most vital problem before him is that of meeting his financial 
obligations. He may be gifted with the very best intellect 
possible, and yet if ready money is not in sight, or the prospect 
for earning a part of his expenses is vague, the problems become indeed 
perplexing. But, judging from past records of students who have 
worked their way through college, no energetic student needs to be 
alarmed. For what students have accomplished in the past can be 
repeated. 

All the large universities are located in the larger cities. This 
readily opens the way to secure employment. Experience indicates that 
a student can find employment, sooner or later, at any task for which he 
possesses marked ability. Some of the positions filled are waiter, bell- 
boy, janitor, driver, clerk, stenographer, book-keeper, agent, launderer, 
tutor, teacher, reporter, etc. The unskilled, the inadaptable, the 
indolent, will have a more difficult time of it, and they must content 
themselves with the less remunerative forms of employment. Students 
who desire something that will not suggest the menial, students who 
wish for something above the ordinary, are apt to find the problem too 
difficult to be solved. On the other hand, the student who has latent 
ability, awaiting only the time to be tested, will soon have his peculiar 
powers developed in the ceaseless struggle for success. 

The amount of outside work that may be taken up varies greatly as 
to the nature of his studies and also as to his own capacity. In the 
professional schools of medicine and applied science, especially the 
former, the situation is rather discouraging. Faculty and students are 
quite agreed that employment cannot be undertaken during the academic 
year without serious detriment to the students' professional training. 
Medical students have the advantage, however, of a longer summer 
vacation in which to earn money. In architecture, good draughtsmen, 
particularly those who have had office experience, have no trouble what- 
ever in getting desirable positions during vacation and spare hours. 

The students in the collegiate departments have more time for 
outside remunerative employment than those of professional schools. 
They are somewhat less mature, so that they are less able to perform a 
particular task better than any competitor. This lack of special profi- 




BISHOP E. B. KEPHART 



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77 



ciency results in lower earnings. A well qualified student can, however, 
earn the equivalent of his tuition. 

In law schools the case is quite different. Practically all the men 
are college graduates, and many of them have been actively engaged in 
teaching or business. This experience in practical affairs makes them 
more adaptable, efficient and reliable. The students in the non -profes- 
sional graduate department earn more money than those in any other 
department, because they are more mature, more experienced, and 
generaily more skilled in some particular subject. 

Let us look now for a moment at the standing of the student who 
works during his spare hours with his more favored fellow who does not 
need to earn his way. It has been shown that the general average 
standing of the employed student is somewhat higher than that of others. 
The higher average of the working students is due more to their 
earnestness of purpose than to superior ability. These students doubtless 
find that owing to the fact that they have less time within which to do 
their studying, they must apply themselves more intensely to their 
academic work. In other words, the higher marks may represent harder 
intellectual work, not necessarily stronger intellectuality. 

The mere presence of these more responsible students is a valuable 
element to balance the irresponsible. The wholesomeness of their spirit, 
the regularity of their conduct, the high standing of their scholarship, 
are valuable assets of the college. The training in practical affairs is 
doubly important, first while at college and then again after graduation. 
In other words, these young men of energy have a double right to 
succeed in the struggle. K. E. S. '06. 

X 3f 



My True Love Hath My Heart 



My true love hath my heart, and I have his, 

By just exchange one for the other given ; 

I hold his dear, and mine he cannot miss ; 

There never was a better bargain driven ; 

My true love hath my heart, and I have his. 

=Sir Philip Sydney. 



THE FORUM 




None But the Brave Deserve the Fair 

HE STORE-BOX philosopher occupied his usual place in front 
of the glowing fire at Kelley's corner store. Round him were 
gathered that miscellaneous group of kindred spirits which be- 
long as much to a country store of a wintry evening as the 
goods on the counter. You have all met with scenes just like it ; the 
proprietor with his beaming face leaning over the counter having little to 
say as a rule, but ever ready to take in the nickels and dimes as good- 
fellowship grows, and the men round the fire indulge in oranges or other 
things. The over-grown farmer's boy teasing or playing some trick on 
some younger fellow ; the farmer discussing the probability of good 
crops with his neighbor ; and the cattle-dealer trying to explain why the 
price of shoats will be higher in the spring. In short it is what among 
the ladies would be called a five o'clock tea, only the gossip, if it may be 
called that, is purely masculine. 

On this particular evening at the corner store, the conversation had 
been interrupted by the entrance of a customer in a whirry of snow, but 
Theo. Dunmore, drubbed the Philosopher by his fellows, directly re- 
sumed : 

" As I was a-saying, gentlemen, this courtin' business conies mighty 
hard for many a young feller. There be fellers what couldn't no more 
get any of yer fine phrases round their thoughts than yer could set fire 
to that paper by sticking it in water. Of course then there is others to 
whom it comes as easy as swallering a raw egg whole. The words just 
slips out as easy as the egg slips down. " 

" Now I haint got anything against the feller that can clothe what 
he wants to say in nice words, if he means what he says ; but things has 
come to such a pass now-a-days, that the woman what has got any bal- 
ance in her is mighty shy of the feller with a silver tongue and honeyed 
words. Seems as though he had had a good bit of experience in the 
business and might be just sort of experimenting on her. Of course if a 
feller knows a girl and wants to jolly her and tell her how purty she is 
and all that, why sartin thats all right. They both knows how to take 
it. But when it comes to the real serious business of courtin', the fellow 
with the honest heart and good head in him, who tells the girl just what 
he believes about her, even though it comes out halting and stammering 



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79 



like, is a-going to have more of a show with the girl of sense than any of 
them dandified fellers with all their glib and polished words. ' ' 

"Now ain't that so, Andy? You shure oughter know something 
about it. Why sure. I tell yer, fellers, what a girl wants in the man 
she marries, is character. He has got ter be worthy of her, and has ter 
appeal to her inner nature sorter. And then there's one more thing a 
man's got ter be when he goes about this yer courtin' business, and that 
is a hero. Not as he has ter be one in the way we oftenest look at it, of 
risking life to save some one. But he's got ter be a man what dares ter 
have convictions and courage enough to let people know he's got em. 
And that brings me ter the story I set about telling yer. Sort of reminds 
me of what that poet feller said about none but the brave deserving ter 
get the fair. Remember about that Andy ? And Jake you was there 
too time I was a-reading that poem. " 

' 1 Guess none of youse fellows remember anything about Bill Allen ? 
Well he came down to these parts to fire for the I,. B. and Q. R. R. and 
put up at Widow Turner's down in Quincy. Bill was considered the 
stiddiest of any man on the road, but for a rail-road man, he was the 
quietest feller you ever saw. Kept shy of the girls too. Why I believe 
the pore feller blushed if he saw a girl a square away. But somehow the 
fellows on the line come ter know that he thought a good deal of May 
Patton, the squire's daughter, though he spoke to her very seldom. 
And I guess May come ter know it too. Girls heve a way of finding out 
yer know, without bein told. Course she never let on to any one except 
once when her father urged her real hard about marrying that Ames 
fellow what was superintendent of this division that time, and whose 
father was Gen'l. Manager of the road. Some folks said that was the 
only reason he was superintendent. That time she spoke up and told her 
father what a fine manly fellow Allen was compared with Ames. Any- 
how she always treated Bill fine and was in every way worthy of his ad- 
miration. Purty ? Well you bet. And she weren't only purty but good 
and true as well. Sort of a wholesouled girl, always trying to do some- 
thing to make others happy. Ames woutd often come up from the city 
on Saturday evenings but the more she saw of him the more she learned 
to despise his weakness of character. Well all this time Bill admired May 
more and more, though he was such a modest sensitive fellow, that he 
could not bring himself to ask such a beautiful, accomplished girl to be 
his wife. He was liked by his fellows though he would not join them in 



80 



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their drinking and gambling. Well one Saturday evening Ames found 
himself some thirty miles from Quincy with no means of getting there until 
late in the evening except by freight No. 36 on which Bill fired. When 
the freight came along it had to lay over for some time at the place, and 
Ames asked the crew into caboose for some drinks and a game of cards. 
Well, Bill he made it a rule as I said never to drink, and of course would 
have none of it. Then Ames up and called Bill a coward, and the fel- 
lows told me afterwards, Bill got such a look into his face that they got 
erfraid of him. But he turned on his heel and went to the engine. When 
the engineer came out he was mighty near full, but Bill never said a 
word. At Burndale Tower they stopped for orders which the engineer 
read with a drunken hiccough and stuck into his pocket. Well, the first 
sign that Billy gets of anything going wrong was the onusual rockin' of 
the engine, and looking up he was horrerfied to see the engineer in a 
drunken sleep. Well it didn't take Billy long to get inter the right-hand 
side and shove that throttle in a notch or two. Then he read the orders 
and was struck most plumb dumb. When he saw that they was to wait 
for a special at Siding 8 three miles back. Well there wasn't moren ten 
minutes before the special was due at the Siding but Billy he backed her 
up and got her on just as the other train whizzed Jby. There was one 
brakeman helped him and they two took the train to the end of the run. 
Ames the superintendenl and the rest of the crew was all dead drunk, 
and was all discharged, and Ames lost his job, though he was the man- 
ager's son. Well Billy was put in the offices of the company and rose 
rapidly. But, Gosh, yer should have seen the change in that fellow. 
His step was firmer and he felt that he could hold his head up with the 
best on 'em. He didn't come to Quincy till about nine months after 
that when he had become chief train despatcher at the terminal. Almost 
the first thing he done was ter go an see May. She came to the door 
herself and — it isn't given ter know everything, fellers — but when she 
came out from the embrace of Billy's big arms, she laughed gentle like 
and said, ' But don't yer know Billy dear what that there poet says, 
about none but ther brave deserving ther fair.' " But its gettin' late, 
fellers, and I think we'd better be a-trotting. 



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81 



James Fenimore Cooper 

P UNTIL the year 1320 American literature consisted of the 
work of Charles Brockden Brown and Irving' s "Sketch 
Book." Apart from these works, what had appeared before 
was so obviously imitative as to express only a sense on the 
part of our numerous authors that they ought to copy the eminent 
authors of England. In the year 1820 appeared the work of a new 
novelist, soon to attain not only a permanent reputation in America, but 
also European recognition more general than Irving' s, if not so critically 
admiring. 

James Fenimore Cooper was born in Burlington, New Jersey, but 
when still a mere boy he moved with his parents to the State of New 
York to a small village afterwards called Cooperstown. This village 
stands on the southeastern shore of Lake Otsego, just at the point where 
the Susquehanna pours out from it on its long journey to the Chesapeake 
Bay. It was here that Cooper passed his childhood days, where lake, 
forest and stream unite to form a most beautiful scenery, quiet but 
picturesque. The place, or rather the country surrounding the little 
village, was so wild that one does not go far out the way when he calls 
it primeval. 

Cooper came from very good stock ; on his father's side he was of 
Quaker descent, and on his mother's side of Swedish descent. His 
mother's maiden name was Elizabeth Fenimore, and it is from this that 
Cooper takes his full name. 

As Cooper spent his boyhood in the wilderness, just at the time 
when the first wave of civilization was beginning to break against the 
surrounding hills, it is no wonder that everything that he saw and 
heard was of just such a nature as to make deep and lasting impressions 
on the boy's mind. He grew up amidst these most charming surround- 
ings, left home, led a varied life, and at last married and settled down in 
New York City. It was while he was living in New York City that he 
read some English novel which was temporarily fashionable but has long 
been forgotten. This novel seemed to enkindle within him a love for 
reading, and still further he was stirred by the notion that he could write 
a better novel than the one he had just read. He made the attempt and 
produced a story now almost as forgotten as the one he read, and gave it 
the title " Precaution." 




82 



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This story, which was published in 1820, was a tale of fashionable 
life in England, of which Cooper knew very little at the time of its 
writing. It had considerable success, being taken for the work of some 
English woman of fashion. 

There is one thing which seems very peculiar in Cooper, and that is 
that he did not write anything worth speaking of until he had 
passed the age of thirty. We see by a careful study of American 
literature that most of our prominent writers began to write at a very 
early age. Cooper died at sixty-two years of age, so it takes but a 
glance to see that he did a great deal of hard labor during the last thirty 
years of his life. In a biography written by Prof. L,ounsbury we find 
seventy books to his credit, a great number considering the time he had 
to do the work. We can see from such a statement that his books were 
all written very hastily. Quite a number of his books deal with matters 
of fact. One thing is sure — he lacked tact as a writer ; for he wrote 
books both about America and England in which, when discussing either 
country, he seemed chiefly animated by a desire to emphasize those 
truths which would be least welcome to the people concerned. 

All the works of Cooper which might have had a tendency to arouse 
a hatred in his readers towards him were written after the death of Sir 
Walter Scott. Between the years 1820 and 1832 he wrote about ten 
novels which have maintained their positions in literature. These ten 
novels have attained world-wide reputation, and have been translated 
from the English, in which they were written, not only into the French 
but into other European languages, in all of which they gained a great 
reputation as well as much popularity. When we look at the great 
number of Cooper's books and take into account their bulk, we cannot 
help thinking that he wrote with great haste and was by all means more 
than a little careless. Indeed we are safe in saying that the number and 
bulk of his books are sufficient proof that he was careless in his writing, 
and the reading of several of his books will still bear more evidence of this 
fact. From a careful study of his biography we learn that he had very 
little literary training and, as I stated before, he had little more tact, if 
any, in the matter of style than he displayed in his personal relations 
with people who did not enjoy his respect. 

In a careful study of his works one finds his English to be very often 
heavy, ponderous and, at times, even clumsy. Now, this being the case, 
it must surely follow that his style could not be the most charming. We 



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83 



very often find Cooper's style to be such that it could hardly be altered 
without bettering it to a very great degree. 

In some of the translations of Cooper's works into other languages, 
more especially the French, the form is made much more agreeable and 
more readable than in Cooper's own style. His work was very irregular, 
and to have this pointed out more clearly we have only to compare some 
of his novels with the works of Hawthorne. In this respect, as to 
regularity, he was far inferior to Hawthorne. In reading his books we 
sometimes find whole paragraphs expanded to great lengths, when he 
really could have expressed the same meaning in a single clause, and 
even wished to do so. Again, while reading on, we find paragraphs in 
which words just seem to be thrown away. In these respects his style is 
far below that of Hawthorne. But, be this as it may, we cannot say 
that his works are not worth reading, for they are. We know that 
Cooper was contemporaneous with Scott, and was even called the 
American Scott, but we would not dare to attempt to compare Cooper 
with Scott, only on the grounds of popularity, for this would be only to 
belittle him. 

It was near the close of the year 1821 when the book that assured 
him great success appeared. This was " The Spy." " The Spy "is an 
historical novel dealing with the American Revolution ; it is often 
conventional, but at the same time set in a vivid background, for Cooper 
actually lived in the country where he laid his scenes. In this book we 
find him sincerely endeavoring not only to revive the fading past but to 
do full justice to both sides in the great conflict which disunited the 
English speaking races. The chief reason that Cooper is able to hold 
the attention of his reader in "The Spy" is simply this— he seems to 
know his characters or the type of men he is describing personally and 
also the scenes in which the story was laid. We find in the novel traces 
of grace of art, but they are at long intervals, and in all his works we 
cannot find grace of art adorning a complete volume. It seems to me 
that his great success as a novelist, and more especially his success with 
" The Spy " (for it is to this work that I have paid particular attention), 
is due wholly to his great force of creation and vigor of description. 
These two qualities we find standing out prominently in "The Spy," 
and especially that of description, but they are not adorned with skill of 
art ; yet we have no right to question their value even when crudely set 
forth as Cooper does in his novels. We find throughout ' * The Spy ' ' 



84 



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that the characters and the incidents related to the characters are all of a 
rough and venturesome kind, but for this reason it is that he is able to 
hold the attention of his readers and all the time makes them eager to 
know what comes next. 

In speaking of description in Cooper's works, especially in his 
"Spy," we find it running through nearly every chapter in the book. 
We cannot compare it with the description found in the romances of 
Hawthorne or in the works of George Eliot, for a novel by Cooper 
appears almost a childish performance when placed beside a novel by 
George Eliot or a romance by Hawthorne. In the early chapters of 
" The Spy," where he describes the storm and the several houses at 
which Harvey Birch stopped before he came to the home of the Whartons, 
and the description of the way in which he was received, surely only a 
great writer is capable of this. 

We see also as we read in his books his uncontrollable temper, which 
at times was truly nothing less than ferocious ; and sometimes he would 
allow his temper to lead him in the choice of themes and treatment of 
plots. One thing which puts his ' ' Spy ' ' as well as all his best works on 
a high plane is the fact that purity prevails through the whole book. 
There is no person who has read any of Cooper's works who would 
hesitate for one moment to put any of them into the hands of any child. 
He is what we might call a national writer, and to have the children read 
his works is to have them inspired within them a love for their country 
and especially a love for a wild and adventuresome life. 

Coming now to the study of the characters in ' ' The Spy ' ' we have 
first the chief character, that of Harvey Birch. In Harvey Birch we 
have brought before us a manly, individual American character. We 
are safe in saying that Harvey Birch is still one of the best known 
characters in fiction, and he has more than once been applauded on the 
stage. The fact that we feel when we read ' ' The Spy ' ' that it is 
General Washington and no other with whom Harvey Birch has his 
memorable interview adds beyond a doubt to the charm and power of the 
book. We can say that his plots are all trivially conventional, and all 
the characters concerned are not particularly like anything recorded in 
American history. We can hardly find any signs of life to his characters. 
Here is the greatest fault in Cooper with regard to character study ; he 
could not undertake with the slightest confidence of success the delinea- 
tion of women or children. We have only to look at the characters of 



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85 



Sarah Frances and Miss Peyton to learn this. If he could have drawn a 
character like Becky Sharp he would have gained a much greater 
reputation and a wider popularity, but what he lacked in character 
drawing he made up in his plots, which were truly put together with the 
greatest skill. The characters which he could develop best seemed to be 
those belonging to the ordinary class of cultured men. But even when 
trying to portray this class of people his touch was not the best. 
Lowell's comment on his characters in The Table for Critics is not at all 
unfair. After declaring Natty Bumpo vital enough to be named in the 
same breath with Parson Adams, and doing surprisingly scant justice to 
Long Tom Coffin, proceeds thus ; 

Don't suppose I would underrate Cooper's abilities. 

If I thought you'd do that, I should feel very ill at ease ; 

The men who have given to our character life 

And objective existence, are not very rife ; 

You may number them all, both prose writers and singers, 

Without overrunning the bounds of your fingers ; 

And Natty won't go to oblivion quicker 

Than Adams the Parson or Primrose the Vicar. 

Here we see that Lowell has said that Cooper has drawn us but one 
new character, yet by doing this we can't help saying that he has done 
something for literature. 

We cannot say that Cooper originated a movement in fiction, but one 
thing we can say without any contradiction, and that is he enlarged a 
movement in two important directions. The romance of the forest and 
prairie and the romance of the sea are his creations, and no one before or 
since Cooper has done them so well . When he is at his best as a novelist 
he has no trouble at all in holding the imaginations of his readers, no 
matter whether they be boys or gray-haired men. 

Coming next to the element of humor in his novels we have little if 
anything good to say, His humor in most of his books is very grim and 
would have saved him a great many mistakes if he had left this element 
out. The humor of some of the characters seems unfortunately lacking 
in his own character, and for this reason he made little success along 
this line. One can see slight touches of humor in " The Spy" where 
the old negro slave Caesar is introduced. One place, for instance, where 
the old peddler comes to the Wharton homestead, and on opening his 
pack old Caesar sets himself to work immediately to select a piece of 
calico for his wife Dinah's dress. He selected a piece in which were 
found the gaudy colors yellow and red, and one can easily imagine the 



86 



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contrast on the black background. There are many touches of humor 
throughout the whole book in which the old negro almost always 
figures most prominently. But, as I have said before, his humor is grim, 
because it is really lacking in his own character ; and if this element is 
lacking in the writer's character it is a very difficult thing to impart it to 
his characters. 

In 1826 Cooper wrote "The Last of the Mohicans," considered by 
many people his best work, and if not the best, one thing is sure — it is 
the most popular of all his romances. If we were to look at this book 
merely as a story of thrilling adventures it would be worthy of high 
praise, but it is much more than this. When we read this we cannot 
help being interested and having our imaginations developed, for we find 
movement throughout the book, and we also find it abounding in the 
poetry of the forest which is embodied in the great old hunter, Hawkeye. 
This book is one in which the interest not only never halts, but never 
sinks. One great fault with the book is that the movement is entirely 
too rapid, not enough time is given between the occurring events. But 
we cannot criticise this work too harshly, for it will not all pass into 
insignificance when we compare it with the great amount of power 
displayed. 

As to the characters, Natty Bumpo is the leading one in the book 
and, as I stated before, is the only living character in any of the books. 
Most of the minor characters in this book do not attract special mention. 
There is, however, a character which holds our attention next to Natty, 
and that is Leather Stocking, who seems to have a character that, as we 
go through the book, seems to be developing and gains our respect. 
Two other characters which attract our attention are Uncas and 
Chingachcook, who have gained Natty's friendship, and to most readers 
they are worthy of it. 

The element of humor in this book, as in " The Spy," is grim, and 
for the same reason as given before — it was not embodied in the character 
of the writer. We find in ' ' The Last of the Mohicans ' ' fine touches of 
description, and one most beautiful is the place where he describes the 
lake. His description of forest and country are very beautiful. 

We find by taking a glance over his works very many places for 
criticism, yet with all his faults of character and art he remains a very 
great man and writer. Someone has said that Cooper with a hundred 
faults possessed the surpassing power due to a large literary creator in a 
field which he found and made his own. And one might say that as a 
large creative genius he is probably without a rival among American 
1:1 ors. M. O. Snyder, '06. 



THE FORUM 87 

THE FORUM. 



Vol. XIX. 



JANUARY, 1906. 



No. 4 



Editoivin-Chief, 

MERLE M. HOOVER, '06. 

Associate Editors, 



KELLER WALTZ 



'08 



JOHN C. RUPP 



, 'o6 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS : 



ETHEL MYERS, '07 
EDWARD E. KNAUSS, '07 



ERMA SHUPE, '08 
M. O. BILLOW, '08 



Business Managers ; 

C. E. SHENK, '06, Chief. 
ASSISTANTS 



M. O. SNYDER, 'o6 



C. RAY BENDER, '07 



The Forum is published each month during the college year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College. 

TERMS :— Subscription Price, 50 cents a Year. Single Copy, 10 cents. 

All business matter should be addressed to The Forum, Annville, Pa. ; all literary matter to 
Merle M. Hoover, Annville, Pa. 

Once a subscriber, always a subscriber, until notice for discontinuance, accompanied with all 
arrearages, has been received. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as second-class mail matter. 



The death of Bishop Kephart has entailed a loss upon Lebanon Val- 
ley College that is irreparable. His venerable figure was familiar about 
the campus and college buildings and upon the streets of Annville. He 
was always a prominent figure at Commencement and other occasions so 
that every where we will always miss his kindly presence. 

His lectures, sermons and chapel talks never failed to be interesting, 
helpful and inspiring and as one of the educational forces of the college 
his loss cannot be adequately estimated. 

But while we miss him as churchman and educator yet it is as 
personal friend that we feel his loss the most. Every student at Leba- 
non Valley College loved and respected Bishop Kephart. He always had 
a kind word and a pleasant smile for each one of us and no one ever 
went to him for help or sympathy and was turned away. By his great 



Editorial. 



88 



THE FORUM 



personality and helpful life he has won a place in the heart of our student 
world which will be hard to replace. 

His life has been an inspiration to many students at Lebanon Valley 
College for no one who ever came into contact with him could help feel- 
ing something of the inspiration of his life. His death came as a shock 
to us all and his loss is felt keenly by everybody. Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege looses in the death of Bishop Kephart one of its greatest forces and 
influences. 

* * * 

The two foot ball rules committees have at last been united, and the 
outlook for football is becoming very hopeful. The college world is 
anxiously waiting to hear the fate of foot ball. The committee now 
working as a whole leaves nothing to be desired in regard to expert 
knowledge of the game, for those who now have the fate of foot ball 
within their grasp are men who thoroughly know the game and are men 
who can be trusted to conscientiously remedy any defects that the game 
now has. 

But, after all, will the men, coming as they do from the large 
colleges and universities, so change the game that the small college will 
benefit as well as the university ? Would it not be wise for the smaller 
colleges to study the game in regard to its adaptation to schools of the 
grade of our own ? It can not be questioned that colleges of our rank 
only can support a good foot ball team with difficulty. We are taxed 
beyond our resources to send out a team which is worthy af our college. 

Considering these things, let us fairly ask ourselves this questiion — 
Does foot ball pay in the small college ? In our own school it does not 
pay financially, for every year the athletic committee must meet a deficit 
more or less large. There is no doubt but that it requires more energy 
to support a team than a small college, such as ours, can justly expend, 
for other sports suffer accordingly. It is a question whether as a college 
advertisement it is worth all that it is claimed to be, for many claim 
that few students have come to our school through the influence foot 
ball exerts. Considering these things, is foot ball worth the energy 
thrown into it ? Is it worth while ? 

We must admit that there are peculiar, local conditions affecting foot 
ball at our own school. The foot ball standard that we must uphold is 



THE FORUM. 



89 



far higher than that upheld by colleges of our own rank in many other 
localities. There are a number of higher institutions in this state whose 
large student body supports very strong teams, teams which play regu- 
ularly the strongest university teams. These teams we in turn play 
and we are expected to make at least a fair showing against them. 
Every other college of our rank plays these large colleges in our vicinity, 
and if we wish to have any athletic prestige we must do likewise. This 
compels us to have a very strong team, taxes our resources and proves a 
strong strain upon our athletic energy. If we would only play colleges 
of our own rank this would not be true. This is a problem which must 
be met sooner or later by every college of our rank in this locality. 

Let us hope that the game as it will be altered will be more adapted 
to the limited resources of the small college. As a game we are loath to 
see foot ball go, since it has endeared itself to the heart of the student 
world ; but as the game is now played sometime, sooner or later, we would 
have to face a crisis and would have to drop this sport, from sheer 
necessity, from our college sports. Let us hope for only the best results 
from the present wave of reform in foot ball. 



90 



THE FORUM 



Alumni Notes 

J. Walter Esbenshade has been elected to the chair of mathematics 
in Campbell College, Holton, Kansas. 

Rev. C. B. Wingerd, '97, has accepted a call to the Conewago Pres- 
byterian church of Hunterstown, Adams county, Pa. 

Rev. Henry A. Sechrist has been selected as the soliciting secretary 
for the Church Erection Society of the United Brethren Church. 

Mr. John D. Stehman and wife, both of the class of 1899, visited her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Kreider. Mr. Stehman is the Y. M. C. A. 
secretary at Bennington, Vt. 

Among the visitors at College during the last month we noticed the 
following; S. D. Faust, '89, professor of church history in the U. B. 
Seminary at Dayton, Ohio ; Prof. H. H. Baish, '01, an instructor in the 
high school at Altoona ; Rev. S. C. Enck, '91, of Columbia ; Dr. Harry 

B. Roop, '92, of Columbia; T. B. Beatty, '04; P. E. Matthias and R. 
L. Engle, both of Yale Divinity School. 

College Notes 

Rev. Dr. Zuck addressed the students' prayer meeting on January 9. 

Prof B. F. Daugherty gave a series of talks in chapel during the 
week of January 15. 

The Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. gave their term reception for 
new students on January 6. A very pleasant evening was spent by all. 

Mr. William H. Ulrich, acting president of the College, addressed 
the students on January 4. He asked the assistance of the students in 
carrying on the usual and necessary work of the College and assured 
them better boarding in the near future. 

The Clionian Literary Society gave a penny social in the old Y. M. 

C. A. room on January 13 from 7:30 to 10 P. M. One penny was 
charged for admission, for receiving or posting a letter at the post office, 
to have your fortune told, and so forth. Candies and cakes were also 
sold. 



THE FORUM 



91 



A number of students took advantage of the first snow fall and 
enjoyed an evening of coasting on January 10. 

The members of the basket ball team spent Sunday morning, Jan. 
14, in going over the Gettysburg Battlefield. 

The Academy boys were forced to take rooms in the men's dormi- 
tory temporarily because of the inability to heat the Academy building. 

At a recent meeting of the Junior Class it was decided to dedicate 
the 1907 Bizarre to the Hon. W. H. Ulrich, of Hummelstown, president 
of the Board of Trustees and acting president of the College. 

Ten new men won the Varsity letters this fall in foot ball — Wilder, 
Dempwolf, Carner, Herrman, Brewer, Appenzellar, Collins, Ludwig, 
Pauxtis and Kauffmann. There is a movement on foot to make the 
standard higher, that is to require men to play in more games in order to 
win their letters. 

Prof. C. A. Jackson, of York high school, a former student of 
chemistry at Lebanon Valley, will have the degree of Master of Science 
conferred upon him by his alma mater, Carleton College, Northfield, 
Minn. , in recognition of his original work in calorimetry. It is for the 
invention of a new method and special apparatus for the ascertaining of 
the specific heat of substances that Prof. Jackson's work will be 
recognized. 

The Funeral of Bishop Kephart 

The funeral services of the late Bishop Kephart were held in the 
Auditorium of the Conservatory of Music Sunday afternoon, January 28. 

The body of the Bishop lay in state in the conservatory from 12.30 
to 2 o'clock and during this time there was a steady stream of friends 
passing by his bier. The Bishop was universally beloved by the people 
of Annville and by the students. Accordingly many took this opportu- 
nity to look for the last time upon the venerable features of the late 
Bishop. 

At the home of the late Bishop private funeral services were held 
under the charge of Dr. Lewis Bookwalter, president of Otterbein Uni- 
versity. A quintet sang " Asleep in Jesus. " Dr. W. R. Funk of Day- 
ton, Ohio, read the Scripture, and Dr. Bookwalter offered prayer. Only 
the members of the family and immediate friends were present. 



92 



THE FORUM 



At two o'clock the Auditorium of the Conservatory was completely 
filled and many were unable to gain admission. Rev. W. J. Zuck, pas- 
tor of the United Brethren Church at Annville had charge of the services. 
After an organ voluntary a quintet sang Foster's " The Souls of the 
Righteous. ' ' Rev. H. S. Gabel then gave a biographical sketch of the 
late Bishop. The Scripture was read by Rev. A. R. Ayers, of York, 
and Rev. C. I. B. Brane, D.D., of Lebanon, offered prayer. 

Dr. G. A. Funkhouserof the U. B. Theological Seminary at Dayton, 
O., preached the sermon, taking as texts, St. John 14:40 and Rev. 23:3- 
4. He was followed by Dr. Daniel Eberly, of Hanover, who spoke on 
" The Labors of a Devoted Life. " Dr. Bookwalter then spoke of Bish- 
op Kephart as a student and scholar, and Dr. W. R. Funk spoke of his 
literary attainments. Resolutions from the U. B. Seminary and telegrams 
from Bishop Matthews and Bishop Castle were then read and the servi- 
ces were closed. 

Many clergymen of the United Brethren Church attended the ser- 
vices. The honorary pall bearers were : Prof. J. E. Lehman, Annville; 
Rev. C. I. B. Brane, D.D., Lebanon; Rev. J. B. Hutchinson, Waynes- 
boro; Rev. D. S. Longenecker, Lebanon; Rev. H. S. Gabel, Dayton, O.; 
Rev. C. T. Stearn, York; Rev. J. P. Anchony, Keedysville, Md.; Rev. 
D. D. Lowery, Harrisburg; Rev. W. H. Washinger, Chambersburg; 
Rev. J. W. Kiracofe, Frederick, Md.; Rev. A. M. Evers, Hagerstown, 
Md.; Rev. J. W. Grimm, York; Rev. M. J. Mumma, Schuylkill Haven; 
Rev. A. R. Myers, Steelton; Rev. W. J. Houck, Washington, D. C; 
Rev. J. Runk, Lebanon; Rev. J. T. Shaeffer, Philadelphia; Rev. D. S. 
Eshleman, Middletown; and Rev. A. R. Ayers, York. 

The active pall bearers were : Rev. I. H. Albright, Reading; Rev. 
H. B. Spayd, Allentown; Rev. E. S. Bowman, Harrisburg; Rev. R. R. 
Rhoads, York; Rev. Joseph Daugherty, York; Rev. A. A. Long, Shamo- 
kin; Rev. G. D. Gossard, Baltimore; and Rev. E. C. Enck, Columbia. 

The floral tributes were very beautiful and came from various places 
and from various societies of which the Bishop was a member. 

The body was interred in Mt. Annville Cemetery. Dr. G. A. Funk- 
houser read the burial service and Rev. D. D. Lowery offered prayer. 
Memorial services were held in the Annville United Brethren Church in 
the evening. Rev. W. J. Zuck, the pastor, Dr. Funkhouser, Dr. Funk, 
Dr. Eberly and Dr. Bookwalter were the speakers. 



THE FORUM 



93 



Personals 

Warren Stehman, '09, spent a week at home the beginning of the 
month on account of illness. 

Prof. Schlichter, Max Snyder and Park Esbenshade attended the 
play V Phedre" at Philadelphia, given by the Sarah Bernhardt company. 

The Junior Class has lost from their membership A. Keller Waltz, 
from Chewsville, Md. 

Mrs. Fred Light, of the class or 1904, and Catherine Gensemer, of 
Cushing Academy, were recent visitors at the College. 

Messrs. A. J. Jones and A. Shelley, students at Butler University, 
Indianapolis, Indiana, former members of the Lebanon Valley foot ball 
team, spent January 4 and 5 visiting their many friends. 

Resolutions 

Whereas, it hath pleased God in his wisdom to call unto Himself 
our beloved Bishop Ezekiel B. Kephart, and 

Whereas, The Philokosmian Literary Society has lost by his death 
a sincere friend, a willing helper, and a fatherly counselor, be it 

Resolved, That while we bow to the will of an all merciful Father, 
we do deeply deplore the death of our good bishop, and that we realize 
in his death the loss of one who has ever been our friend 

Resolved, That we unite in tendering onr sincere sympathy and 
condolence to the family and friends who mourn his death 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be placed on the minutes 
of our society, that copies be published in the College Forum and The 
Annville Journal, and that a copy be sent to the family of the deceased. 

Signed, 
Merle M. Hoover, 
M. O. Biu,ow, 

Committee. 

Basket Ball 

Since the opening of the winter term the basket ball team played 
three games at the following places : On January 6 they were defeated 



94 



THE FORUM 



by the Middletown A. A., the score being 33-7. Our boys were handi- 
capped by the slipperiness of the floor, and when once they started they 

did not stop until they struck the opposite side. The line-up : 
L. V. C. 

Knauss forward Deckard 

Collins (Oldham) forward Rewalt 

Hall centre Hatz 

Oldham (Collins) guard Stehman 

Maxwell (Capt.) guard Hoffman 

Two games were played January 12 and 13 at Shippensburg and at 
Gettysburg. Both games were lost by scores of 34-13 and 51-13. 
Besides overcoming the disadvantage of playing on a strange floor they 
were also unfortunate in not being in their best form. Although they 
practice hard every day in the Town Hall, yet they are unable to secure 
proper practice because of the smallness of the Hall. Better results will 
only be obtained by the construction of a gymnasium, not only for our 
athletic teams but for the physical development of the entire student 
body as well. 

The Lebanon Valley College five defeated the Schuylkill Seminary 
basket ball team in the town hall on Jan. 20 by a score of 16-10. The 
game was fast and exciting from start to finish, both teams playing a 
good game. Referee Appenzellar called the game promptly at 7 o'clock, 
and shortly after they started, Knauss threw goal for I,. V. C. and from 
then on, our boys were in the lead by a narrow margin. The first half 
ended with the score standing at 12-4. 

The second half was just as fast and exciting as the first, each team 
scoring six points. Bohler, a member of last years' team, played an ex- 
cellent game for Schuylkill Seminary, and displayed great accuracy in 
goal shooting. Special mention cannot be given to any individual alone, 
as the whole team played together to win the game. The final score was 
16-10. The line up : 

L. V. C. S. S. 

Knauss forward Brett 

Wilder forward Parfit 

Hall centre Bohler 

Carnes guard Lobb 

Maxwell guard Litlegow 



THE FORUM 



95 



Goals from field — Knauss 3; Carnes 2; Wilder 2; Maxwell 1; Bohler 
1 ; Brett 1 ; Parfit 1 . Goals from foul — Bohler 4. Time of halves — 20 
minutes. Referee — Appenzellar. 

On January 27, the 'Varsity and Reserves played a practice game in 
preparation for future trips, the final score being 27-16. Ludwick played 
weil for the Reserves while Wilder excelled for the 'Varsity. 

Glee Club Concert 

The Lebanon Valley Glee, Mandolin and Guitar Clubs gave their 
annual concert in the College chapel on January 16. The following was 
the program rendered : 

Part I— The Chase (A. Giebel), Glee Club; Frangesa March, 
(DeCosta), Mandolin Club; Bendemeer's Stream (Moore), quartet; 
Darkies' Cradle Song (Wheeler), Glee Club; solo, Serenade (J. Oliver), 
J. K. Jackson; University Girl Waltzes (Tocaben), Mandolin Club; 
Absence (D. Buck), Glee Club. 

Part II — Plantation Song (Parks), quartet; solo, Border Ballad 
(F. H. Cowen), A. R. Spessard ; Yachting Glee (Culbertson), octette; 
Character Sketch (arranged), W. H. Hamilton and Eber Ludwick ; Mrs. 
Cosy's Boarding House (J. C. Macy), Glee Club; College Life March 
(Frantzen), Mandolin Club ; Alma Mater (arranged), Glee Club. 

After the program, which pleased and delighted all, the girls of the 
College gave a reception to the Glee Club in the ladies' parlor, which 
was tastelully decorated with the College colors and green plants. 

Souvenir programmes were also presented to each one present at 
the concert. 

There has been quite a change both as to the program and the per- 
sonnel of the club. The new members of the glee club are first tenors, 
Messrs. Clippinger, Hamilton, and Hartman; second tenors, Mr. Flook; 
first basses, Messrs. Herr, Mills and Weidler. The Mandolin and Gui- 
tar Club is also an innovation. The house was well filled and the prog- 
ram was a great success. One of the new features is the Yachting Glee 
by the octette in which the boys appear in yachting costumes. Another 
one, is an octette accompanied by the Mandolin Club in the College Life 
March. 

After the program the hall girls gave a reception to the Glee Club 
in the Ladies' parlors which were tastefully decorated with green plants. 



96 



THE FORUM 



The Mandolin Club played during the evening. Everybody seemed to 
enjoy themselves and on leaving each member of the Club was presented 
with a tiny suit case, — tied with the college colors. 

x x 
Exchange Notes. 

We are glad to again receive among our exchanges The Vassar 
Miscellany. All of its departments are equally excellent and we wish 
that more of our exchanges would follow it. 

The editorials and various departments of The College Student are 
interesting and very well written. 

The addition of more literary material to The College Times would 
certainly improve this publication. 

The Dickinsonian and State Collegian are both as bright and interest- 
ing as ever. 

THINGS SAID 
" What's a Lab quiz in Biology ? " 
— The thing had an omnious sound to me — 
" Its really not bad — don't bother your head 
** They take you apart in the office, " she said, 
' ' They ask you some simple questions you know, 
Such as Where do the pumaxillia grow ' " 
' ! They take you apart in the office, ' ' thought she, 
" Now if the instructor disarticulates me 
How can I articulate to show 

That I know where the pumaxillia grow? " — Exchange 
The Milton College Review is a very neat and interesting little paper. 
The material in The Anchor, Hope College, is certainly very dry. 
'* Songs of the People " in the College Folio, Allentown, is well writ- 
ten. This paper is very dainty and attractive. 

"The Friendship of Books " in the Juniata Echo is good. 

" Oh the leanness of a Senior when he's lean 

And the meanness of a Sophie when he's mean 

But the leanness of the lean, 

And the meanness of the mean 

Can ne'er compare with the 

Greenness of a Freshie when he's green. — Ex. 



THE FORUM 



The unattractive cover of The Jeffersonian is certainly not an index 
to the excellent material contained within. 

We wish all our readers could see the [excellent editorial in the 
Delaware College Review on ' ' The Price of Notoriety. ' ' It expresses 
our sentiments exactly. 

"Honor in Examinations" in The Susquehanna is very timely at 
this season of mid-year examinations. 

Mosaics of Thought in the Amulet, State Normal School, are well 
chosen this month. 

Otterbein Aegis seems to have overlooked its Exchange column in 
the December issue. 



Rensselaer e \ 

Polytechnic^^ 
SS,* Institute, 

%f Troy, N.Y. 

Local examinations orovided for. Send for a Catalogue. 


William H. Kreider 

CLASS OF 1894 

Attorney-at-Law 

S. E. Cor. Broad and Chestnut Sts., 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 


Slanted Steam Laundry and 

Scouring lUorKs, 
27 n, 7 Street, Lebanon, Pa, 

ALLEN F. WARD, Class of 1890, Prop, 

Prompt and Good Service Given. 


W. J. Baltzeil, Class '84, 

Managing Editor of 

THE ETUDE, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Leading Musical Magazine in the United 
States. 



Lemberger's compound tar Lozenges 

IN BOXES— 25c, 10c and 5c. 

p o r nly ar at d LEMBERGER &, CO.'S PHARMACY, Lebanon, Pa. 

JOS. L. LEMBERGER, Ph. M. FRANK GLEIM Ph.G. 



HARRY LIGHT 

UiAIlL PAPER 



Cofoep Jflain and fllanheino Streets, 

flnnville, Penn'a. 

Hlujays has on Hand a pull Ltine of 



AflO UUIfiDOixl SHADES 

Paper and Shade flanging a Specialty. 



THE FORUM. 

TJhe Charm of Sndividuality 

*?7far/cs every portrait produced by 

Sates' Studio 



142 Tforth 8th Street, 
^Discount to Students. 



jCebanon, ZPenn'a. 

Spec/at Spates to Classes' 



FOR THE LATEST 
AND BEST IN . , , 



Hats 



And MEN'S 
FURNISHINGS 



to Erb & Craumer 



777 Cumb, St., 



LEBANON 



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Bakery 

Has always on hand 

? re$b Bread, CaKe$ ana Rolls 

ANNVILLE, PA, 

One door west of Pennsylvania House. 



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15,000 Edison and Columbia Records to select from. 

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Books, Stationery, 

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PAPER, FANCY GOODS, ALBUMS 
TOILET CASES, CALENDARS, CARDS 
GAMES, PURSES, HOLIDAY GOODS 
or anything kept in an up<-t<vdate Book 
Store, call or write 

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21 S. 8th St., LEBANON, PA. 



THE FORUM vtf^ n > w *~ 

Catering . . . 

Weddings DIETRICH'S, 

OUR SPECIALTY 1015 N. Third Street. 225 Market Street. 

Fancy Ices, Cakes, Confections Harrisburg, Pa. 

Shipped Anywhere. Correspondence Solicited. 



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Electric Light Electric Wiring 

Electrical Supplies 
ot every description 

ANNVILLE, * « PA. 


JNO. S. SHOPE 

Queensware 
Groceries Hardware 

LADIES' and GENTS' 

Furnishings 

Discount to Students 

West Main St., Annville, Pa. 


ur. ndiry z^iiiiiiiciiiiciii 
Dentist 

Reductions to Students 
72 West Main St., Annville, Pa. 


JOSEPH G. KELCHNER 
Butcher 

Daily Meat Market of home dressed meats 

Also a full line of Smoked Meats. 
Annville, > ' Pa, 


JOSEPH MILLER, 
Furniture and Undertaking, 

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W, C. WOOLF 

Groceries and Provisions 

65 East Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 


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Dealer In 

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Contents. 



The Two George Washingtons 

Oliver Wendell Holmes 

Bishop Kephart, An Appreciation 

The Nightingale's Victory 

A Hungry News Boy 

Man As a Stmggler 

Announcement 

Editorial .... 
Alumni Notes . 
Exchange Notes . 
The Week of Prayer . 
College Notes 
The Junior Banquet . 
Personals .... 
Basket Ball 



THE FOR.UM. 

Volume XIX. FEBRUARY, 1906 Number 5 



The Two George Washingtons. 

T WAS a hot August day, scarcely a leaf stirred and the flowers 
drooped their heads as if praying for rain. We played, or rather 
we tried to play, prisoner's base and tag but nothing went right. 
Hot and tired we sat on the pump bed, beneath the old 
grape-arbor. What should we do? Every suggestion was ended by, 
"Oh, its too hot for that." Finally, Margaret, the youngest of the four 
said, "Let's go get grandmother to tell us stories." 

"Oh, she's sleeping now," someone said. "Maybe she's just 
ready to wake up," persisted Margaret. 

No one suggested anything else, so we four, Don, Ruth, Margaret 
and myself, went up the old stone-path, over the vine-covered porch into 
the great kitchen where peace and coolness reigned. 

Grandmother sitting by the casement window, greeted us with a 
smile of pity as she looked at our hot faces — "Girls, where are your 
sunbonnets?" but Margaret, without paying any attention to grand- 
mother's question, in her most coaxing voice said, "Gradmother won't 
you tell us some stories, 'cause it's so awful hot?" 

Don, boy -like, curled up on the old yellow wood-box and gazed up 
at the tongs and poker, hanging above his head; Margaret sat with her 
head against grandmother's knee, for she was entitled to that place as 
she was the youngest of all the grandchildren; Ruth and I sat in the 
door- way looking at the cool green grass. 

Grandmother told us story after story, how she tried to learn to 
ride horseback, of walking to school on the snow crust, of the snows 
which covered the fences and all the other land marks, how they used to 
coast down hill in a big wooden box which it was impossible to guide 
and which would bumpety-bump into a great snow drift, burying box 
and passengers, then too, she would tell us of the queer little dollies 
greatgrandmother made for her out of a piece of cloth with cornsilk for 
hair and black dots for eyes but which she loved as well as we did our 



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jointed dolls with really truly hair, but we had heard them all before 
and we craved something new, something exciting. 

Ruth, ever on the alert said, "Grandmother, don't you know any 
stories about some other people ? Couldn't you tell us something about 
George Washington, something that you know really happened ?" 

Grandmother's head was nodding slowly up and down for grand- 
mother had the most aggravating way of visiting dreamland just when 
we wanted her most. Ruth's question roused her partly and she said, 
"Child, which George Washington do you mean? — George Washington 
the first, or George Washington, the second?" 

Ruth's face was a puzzle, "Why, I only heard of one, grandmother." 

" To be sure, dear, you only could know about George Washington 
II.. but the other one is the one I liked the best." 

" But, grandmother, no one but you ever said anything about 
George Washington II. They always call him, at least father says — " 

' ' Your father forgets and even he knew only a little about George 
Washington, the first. He only knew what I told him and that was 
little enough. George was always good to me and always tried to do 
everything I wanted him to. He used to make me the dearest, little 
chairs out of wood. I wonder, where they are now. It has been a long 
time since I saw them. They ought to be in a little carved box which 
he made for them. Perhaps, Emma knows where they are. I must ask 
her when she comes in. Why don't you remember he is the one that 
taught me to ride horseback, and always did my milking for me." 

By this time we are all filled with awe to think that our grandmother 
knew such a person as George Washington and that he did such menial 
things as milking cows, it was all beyond our comprehension. 

Ruth was not to be dismayed, however. "Grandmother, grand- 
mother," for grandmother's head was nodding again and Margaret was 
fast asleep. " Grandmother," she repeated, " was your George Wash- 
ington father of the one father talks about and which one, yours or his, 
did they call father of his country and g was it yours that whipped the 
British?" 

" The British, why what's the child talking about," said grand- 
mother, now fully awake and then she laughed her soft merry laugh, 
" why dearie me, I wasn't talking about that George Washington, I 
was talking about, why here he comes now, the colored man, George 
Washington Jackson." 



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m 



Oliver Wendell Holmes 

LIVER WENDELL HOLMES is easily the cleverest and most 
versatile of American authors. He was a poet, wit, humorist, 
novelist, essayist, college lecturer and writer on medical topics. 
Of his birth at Cambridge, Holmes wrote in a letter to the 
New York Critic: " I took my first draught of that fatal mixture 
called atmospheric air on the 29th of August, 1809. My father's record 
of the fact is before me on a page of the Massachusetts Register, in the 
form of a brief foot-note thus : 'August 29, son b.' " His father was 
a minister who soon found that the son was not set for the same pro- 
fession. After his graduation from Harvard in 1829 in a class which he 
has made famous by various occasional poems, he studied law for a year, 
but gave it up to study medicine. He spent three years abroad and at 
the beginning of 1836 he was ready to hang out a sign in Boston. But 
he was destined to succeed as a medical writer and lecturer rather than 
as a practioner. His biographer, Mr. John T. Morse, Jr. , puts it in this 
way: " When he said that the smallest fevers were thankfully received, 
the people who had no fevers laughed, but the people who had them 
preferred some one who would take the matter more seriously than this 
lively young joker was likely to do." Mr. Morse has also pointed out 
that it was bad professional policy to issue a volume of poems the year 
he was beginning to practice. He first served Dartmouth College as 
professor of anatomy and then was called to the Harvard Medical School 
where for the better part of a life-time he occupied, as he himself 
expressed it, not a chair but a settee. 

When Lowell was asked to be editor of a new magazine, "The 
Atlantic Monthly," in 1857, he asked Holmes to write and had it not 
been for this request it is possible that we would never have had the 
"Autocrat" papers which made Holmes famous at once. In these 
papers we find many thoughts about poets and poetry that are famous 
for sympathetic beauty and scholarly insight. Here are two paragraphs 
picked up at random: 

" Poets are never young, in one sense. Their delicate ear hears the 
far-off whispers of eternity, which coarser souls must travel towards for 
scores of years before their dull sense is touched by them. Many youth- 
ful poets have written as if their hearts were old before their time ; their 
pensive morning twilight has been as cool and saddening as that of even- 



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ing in some common lives. The profound melancholy of those lines of 
Shelley, 

" I would lie down like a tired child 
And weep away the life of carej 
Which I have borne and yet must bear." 
came from a heart as he sang, 'too soon grown old,' at twenty-six, as 
dull people count time even when they talk of poets. ' ' 

M I have known more than one genius, high-decked, full-freighted, 
wide-sailed, gay-pennoned, that love for the bare toiling arms and brave, 
warm-beating heart of the faithful little wife that nestled close in his 
shadow, and clung to him so that no wind or wave could part them, and 
dragged lines on against all the tide of circumstance, would soon have 
gone down the stream and been heard of no more." 

While quoting prose I'll take this chance to give a word or two 
Holmes once spoke to Lowell, which clearly reveals that he knew the 
seriousness of great art even if it is true that he many times lacked it. 
He said, "The value of a poet to the world is not so much his reputa- 
tion as a writer of this or that poem, as the fact that the poem is known 
to be wrapt out of himself at times, and carried away into the region of 
the divine ; it is known that the spirit has descended upon him, and 
taught him what he should speak. ' ' 

The poetical work of Holmes was done in the first half of his 
literary career. His first volume of poems came out in 1836 and con- 
tained the two lyrics "Old Ironsides" and "The Last Leaf," which 
make his place secure among American poets. Many of his cleverest 
pieces of humor appeared along with them. Abraham Lincoln found 
' ' The Last Leaf ' ' inexpressably touching and never grew tired of the 
melody of 

"The mossy marbles rest 

On the lips that he has pressed 

In their bloom; 
And the names he loved to hear 
Have been carved for many year 

On the tomb." 

In this poem the humor of Holmes is at its best, the kind that calls for 
the smile and the tear. This element of pathos is the crowning element 
of true humor and is our poet's greatest grace. 

His collegiate and patriotic ballads are full to the brim of festive 
good-fellowship and he showed himself an adept at fitting his thoughts 



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101 



and phrases for various occasions. No writer has ever surpassed him in 
occasional verse. 

His later poetry came along with the Autocratic " papers in 1857 
and then it was that we got the best of his graver poems and the one 
that of all others will be blessed with a deserved immortality, "The 
Chambered Nautilus." It was the one Whittier admired. 

" This is the ship of pearl, which, poets feign, 

Sails the unshadowed main, — 

The venturous bark that flings 
On the sweet summer wind its purpled wings 
In gulfs enchanted, where the Siren sings, 

And coral reefs lie bare, 
Where the cold sea-maids rise to sun their streaming hair. 

•' Its webs of living gauze no more unfurl, 

Wrecked is the ship of pearl ! 

And every chambered cell, 
Where its dim dreaming life was wont to dwell, 
As the frail tenant shaped his growing shell, 

Before thee lies revealed, — 
Its irised ceiling rent, its sunless crypt unsealed ! 

" Year after year beheld the silent toil 

That spread its lustrous coil; 

Still, as the spiral grew, 
He left the past year's dwelling for the new, 
Stole with soft step its shining archway through, 

Built upon its idle door, 
Stretched in his last-found home, and knew the old no more. 

" Thanks for the heavenly message brought by thee, 

Child of the wandering sea, 

Cast from her lap forlorn ! 
From thy dead lips a clearer note is born 
Than ever Briton blew from wreathed horn ! 

While on mine ear it rings, 
Through the deep caves of thought I hear a voice that sings. 

"Build thee more stately mansions, O my soul, 

As the swift seasons roll ! 

Leave thy low-vaulted past ! 
Let each new temple, nobler than the last, 
Shut thee from heaven with a dome more vast, 

Till thou at length are free, 
Leaving thine out-grown shell by life's unresting sea." 



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He was a typical Bostonian and this city delighted to call him her 
laureate who said he would rest upon having said, ' ' Boston is the hub 
of the universe." Indeed he became on such familiar 'terms with its citi- 
zens that he could be frank enough to write, ' ' I have always considered 
my face a convenience rather than an ornament." Men were his fitting 
study and he could hint off their foibles in a way that set assemblies of 
dignity langing with undignified enthusiasm. 

The satire of Holmes is of little or no force when set along side of 
Iyowell's " Biglow Papers." He was too genial to deal blows that count. 
Transcendentalism amused him greatly and there is genuine satire in his 
thrusts at this spiritualism. 

This good man is not altogether innocent of the charge of social 
prejudice. He liked to see the family portraits on the wall and smiled 
over the recitals of long and honored ancestral pedigrees. Prof. Beers 
says this prejudice bordered on scrabbery. But, after all, this is a small 
fault when overshadowed by so many fascinating excellencies of charac- 
ter. He was good and this remark about his church going habits is very 
characteristic : 1 ' There is a little plant called Reverence in the corner 
of my soul's garden which I love to have watered about once a week." 

He was no great thinker but he had the ability to make old things 
shine with new brilliancy. 

Mr. J. W. Chadwick has pointed out a prominent side of the influ- 
ence of this beloved New Bnglander who died in 1894, the last of the 
famous group to which he belonged : ' ' Whittier did more than Holmes 
to soften the Puritan theology, but Holmes did vastly more than Whittier 
to soften the Puritan temper of the community. * * * * * This 
was 'an undisguised enjoyment of earthly comforts,' a happy confidence 
in the excellence and glory of our present life; a persuasion, as one has 
said, that 'if God made us he also meant us,' and he held to these things 
so earnestly, so pleasantly, so cheerily, that he could not help communi- 
cating them to everything he wrote. They pervade his books and poems 
like a moist subtle essence, and his readers took them in at every breath. 
Many entered into his labors, and some, no doubt, did more than he to 
save what was best in the Puritan conscience while softening what was 
worse in the Puritan temper and what was most terrible in the Puritan 
theology. It does not appear that any one else did so much as Dr. 
Holmes to change the social temper of New England, to make it less 
harsh and joyless, and to make it easy for his fellow-countryman the 
transition from the old things to the new." N. C. Schuchter '97. 



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103 



Bishop Kephart, An Appreciation 

ITH sadness of heart the church and college received the sad 
news of Bishop Kephart' s death. As our resolutions testify 
a friend has fallen. 

Out of an empty heart one cannot speak, but on the other 
hand the fullness of one's heart holds back its entire expression. Such 
is my feeling as I endeavor to pay a tribute to his place in our hearts. 

How replete with valuable lessons are the lives of men who have 
borne the burdens and the heat of battles fierce and long, and on which 
account not the gods but the hearts and hands of common men have 
wrought a wreath for the brow of the victor. 

Some men are brilliant in their times but their words and deeds are 
of little worth to history. Not so with this man. His mission was as 
vast as humanity and enduring as time. He was great in life, great in 
death and great in the history of his church. He was raised up for his 
times. 

We are to judge men by their surroundings and measure their great- 
ness by the difficulties which they surmount. Some men are great 
because of the littleness of their surroundings. This man was reared in 
the midst of great men. 

If we accept the doctrine that the only proper contents of history are 
the actions of great individuals, then of the individuals who have made 
the history of the U. B. Church the name of Ezekiel B. Kephart, 
brilliantly above the rest, shines as a star, and that not an evening but 
rather a morning star, driving away the obstacles of advancing day and 
with keen foresight directing the onward march. This star with its five 
fingers points to five chief elements in his character. 

As a bishop we were proud of him. Of splendid physique, of noble 
bearing and of courteous demeanor he commanded the respect and confi- 
dence of men everywhere. With a legal turn of mind, his training as 
pastor, college president and Senator he became the acknowledged parlia- 
mentarian of his church, and at our general conferences was, during 
critical times, invariably called to fill the chair. Never found off his 
guard nor a partisan in debate his rulings were always accepted as just. 
With wide experience and constructive ability he was able to plan wisely 
for the church he loved. Other denominations gladly gave him a part in 
their counsels and their leaders recognized him as a brother, strong and 




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noble. Only he who was jealous of his strength and position would deny 
him this eminence. The other qualities of his character but fitted him 
the more for this eminent position. 

First place is given to him as an educator. He was the first college 
man to be called to the bishopric in our church. We have not forgot- 
ten the little history of his life given to us at one of our services when he 
told us how he studied his Latin grammar and translated the classics 
while making shingles. His own struggle in securing an education was 
an incentive to others. As a college president his record was brilliant. 
He exerted an ideal influence. As a loadstone he drew students to 
him and helped them up the hill. Every school in our church has felt 
his influence and others outside. On the general board of education he 
proved his wisdom and good judgment. 

Many a young man will say today, " I have an education because he 
ived. " His last efforts were in behalf of a new school. 

The school law of the State of Iowa is a monument to him. 

The U. B. Church has more schools, a higher educational standard 
for its ministers, a larger place and mission in the world because he lived 
and wrought. 

He succeeded because he was a man for men. He rightly claimed 
the respect and confidence of men everywhere. He was a manly man, 
knew the temptations, ambitions and short comings of men and sympa- 
thized with them. He loved men. Not he, to carry up his sleeve a big 
stick to clear his way. He saw men's needs and brought the remedy. 
His themes were always lofty, aimed to lift men up and inspire them to 
nobler endeavors. He drew men to him as the great sharer of their 
difficulties. A good counsellor, they sought him. His influence on the 
world's manhood cannot be estimated. 

In no way was his greatness shown more than as a friend. He ex- 
emplified what Cicero calls the primary law of friendship in that he ex- 
pected from his friends only what was honorable and in return did only 
what was honorable. 

His success and elevation to positions high, only made him the more 
simple in his life. Like his Master whom he served he had a place for 
the child in his heart and life. Our lives have all been touched and 
inspired as we saw God's nobleman walking our streets and crossing our 
campus with the hands of his grandchildren in those of his own. The 
man who has a place in his heart for the child has a place in his heart 



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105 



for men. To them he was a shelter. In a letter from my brother were 
these words. " Next to my father, Bishop Kephart did more for me 
than any other man. " In a recent issue of the Telescope is a tribute 
from Bishop Mathews headed, " A Tribute to My Friend. " His loss 
was felt by all who knew him. 

Unlike the Roman Curius he was not born with teeth to be buried in 
his fellow men but with a heart large enough to enclose both friend and 
foe and to give to each a square deal. 

He was a great herald of a greater. He had come in vital touch 
with the greatest herald of the greatest news. Through this communion 
he saw his own heart, claimed the remedy and triumphed in that faith, 
" that will not shrink though pressed by many foes. " Heralding the 
Nazarene as God's answer to the ultimate needs of the soul he repeated 
the words of his Master, " They have no need to go away from me to buy 
food. " His first text was, "lam come to seek and to save that which 
was lost. ' ' He was never puffed up with a sense of his own importance. 

He had a great mission to be a finger board to point men " to the 
Lamb of God that taketh away the sin of the world. ' ' Only a finger 
board, yet such a one that the mighty paid him reverence. 

"Without a vision the people perish. " Let us get the grand, 
noble, hopeful vision of our life mission as he had of his and then by 
hitching our chariot to the same star as he our lives will be a blessing. 
A general of ancient times was fleeing before the enemy and sought ref- 
uge within a city held by his mother. At. the gate he cried for admit- 
tance. From the wall his mother cried, ' ' Only as a conqueror may my 
son enter here." He faced about, conquered the enemy and entered a 
conqueror. 

Faithful unto death as the subject of this tribute was, let us also 
enter as conquerors. 

" The work is done, how well 

Only the Master knows. 
One never sees the fruit 
Of all the seeds he sows." 

" It may be only our part 

To patiently turn the sod. 

One plants, another waters 

But the increase comes from God." 

J. Balmbr Showers, '07. 



106 THE FORUM 

The Nightingale's Victory 

NCE upon a time a nightingale and a cuckoo spent a night in 
the same grove. Soon after the sun had set the cuckoo flew to 
the top of the highest tree and perched himself for the night. 
The nightingale, however, twittered from one tree to another, 
and when it became dusk warbled her beautiful notes. These she re- 
peated at successive intervals throughout the evening and during the 
early morning. The cuckoo listened to every note impatiently, and as 
soon as the sun had risen, he shook himself and flew straight to the tree 
where he had last heard the nightingale. He was very much displeased 
and intended to scold her for singing when he wanted to sleep. 

"Why did you disturb my slumbers last night by your warbling?" 
he asked as soon as he found the nightingale resting peacefully on a 
small limb of an old oak tree. 

" My friend, I was not conscious of disturbing you. I thought my 
singing was appreciated by everybody," replied the nightingale not a 
little surprised at the cuckoo's harsh words. 

"Well, if you thought so, you were greatly mistaken. I do not 
want to be disturbed by your singing again," said the cuckoo more 
harshly than ever. 

The nightingale in frightened tones answered, "But I must sing, 
because I have so many friends that like to hear my beautiful song. 
Sometimes I become so exhausted from singing that I can not please 
them all. If you wish it, I will teach you my beautiful song, and then 
you can help me to entertain my friends. ' ' 

This offer only increased the cuckoo's indignation. He replied, 
' 1 What ! Do you think I would condescend to learn that discordant 
song of yours? It would spoil the beauty of my own sweet melody. 
Besides, if you have so many friends, why don't you get some of them 
to help you ? No, no madam nightingale, my song is sweeter than yours, 
and I will not waste my time at trying to learn something that I do not 
like. My song is so beautiful that it is imitated even by clocks, so that 
it may be heard every hour. ' ' 

The nightingale felt that there was some truth in the cuckoo's last 
words. After thinking a few moments she said, "Only last night the 
rabbit and cricket told me that they would rather hear my song than 
yours, and surely they ought to know which is the better. 




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107 



" It does not matter what they said. They do not know what good 
singing is. As for myself, I do not want to hear your disagreeable song 
again," retorted the cuckoo. 

The nightingale ruffled her feathers and said, "Master cuckoo, on 
account of my continuous singing last night I am very tired and need 
rest. But before I take my rest, I would like to decide this matter about 
our singing. Over there under that cypress tree is an honest looking 
donkey. I am sure he would decide this dispute for us. Let us fly over 
to him ; and if he consents to be judge for us, we will sing before him 
and let him decide whose song is the better. ' ' 

"Very well," replied the cuckoo, " I will go with you provided you 
promise never to sing your song again if the donkey decides in my favor. ' ' 

" I promise you that," said the nightingale ; and away they flew to 
the green grass in front of the donkey. 

After telling him about their dispute the cuckoo said, " Master 
Donkey won't you listen to our singing and then decide which is the 
better singer ?' ' 

This was the first time that this donkey had been given any credit 
for his own opinion. He was an intelligent donkey and soon saw the 
dignity of his position ; and as he did not possess the usual amount of 
donkey perversity, he promptly answered, " Yes." 

The birds flew to the lowest limb of the cypress tree and both seemed 
very glad to put their vocal powers to a test. The donkey pointed his 
long ears and listened attentively to catch every note. Soon the cuckoo 
started his series of notes. He gave them in his best style and when he 
had finished, the donkey said, "Very well done, Master Cuckoo, you 
have a very sweet voice. I am sure I would be pleased if mine would 
sound half so sweetly." 

This pleased the cuckoo, and he felt quite certain of getting a favor- 
able decision. This according to the promise would relieve him of the 
necessity of ever again hearing the nightingale's melody of which he was 
really jealous, and he was already planning how he would punish the 
nightingale if she would break her promise. 

Madam nightingale waited to sing until all was very quiet. When 
she heard nothing but the rustling of a few leaves above her, she began 
her sweetest strain. It was her best song given in her most pleasing 
manner. Her continuous singing during the preceding night seemed to 
have improved her voice for the test. In a few moments she stopped 



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singing and both eagerly awaited the donkey's decision. The donkey 
looked as wise as he could and said, " My friends, you have both sung 
very sweetly, but I think the nightingale is the better singer. The cuckoo 
was disappointed very much and flew sullenly away to some distant trees. 
The nightingale remained to thank the donkey for his kindness and then 
flew after the cuckoo. 

When she found the cuckoo she said, " Master cuckoo, I hope you 
have learned a useful lesson today. I know that you have long been 
jealous of my singing ability, and that you exacted that promise from me 
in order to prevent my singing. But you now see the futility of the 
schemes of the jealous. So let both of us sing as sweetly as we can and 
be friends. Good-day." 

Then the nightingale flew back to her sleeping-place, and ever since 
the cuckoo has not said another cross word to her. 



A Hungry News Boy 

" All attempts to dispose of my newspapers during the day having 
failed, tired and exhausted I halted before the window of a large res- 
taurant in New York. 

My feet were bruised and sore for want of shoes, my clothes were 
in rags, and I suppose my face cold and pinched looked older than it 
should. Imagine my thoughts as I looked at the grand display of rich 
meats and pastry in that window. I was cold, hungry and penniless. 

As I gazed upon the happy faces and rich dresses of those who had 
never known what it was to be poor, there stole over me a feeling of 
loneliness and wretchedness. I wondered if the rich man's heaven was 
also the poor man's heaven; and if so, if he would catch sight of and 
notice the hungry, pinched and cold-faced news boy there. 

After having stood there for about ten minutes, sick at heart I 
slowly turned away to seek a place where I might sleep. A poor but 
kind old gentleman gave me something to eat and permitted me to sleep 
in his barn. I lay down on the straw and in a few minutes was sound 
asleep, dreaming of what I had seen in the restaurant window." 

Duke Snydbr 



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109 



Man as a Struggler 

N HIS old age Goethe said, " I have been a man, which signifies 
a struggler. " No other expression could have been so appro- 
priate for summing up his life, which was one vast struggle for 
truth and beauty in literature. That this struggling resulted 
in success, is clearly shown by the excellency of his literary work. 

As Goethe struggled to attain his ideal, we should struggle to attain 
ours. It is not enough only to know what to do. We must brace up 
and do our duty with a will. The days of the sluggard are past, as are 
also those of the dignified idler. Labor does not detract from our dig- 
nity; but adds to our happiness and leads to real noble grandeur. We 
are not justified in being contended with the place determined for us by 
the general course of events. We no longer believe that numerous 
invisible gods control our destinies. Even if such were the case, there 
would be no reason for us not to oppose them and to struggle for some- 
thing higher and better. Nor are we in this twentieth century inclined 
to remain at the bottom to aid the lower classes, when we are fitted for 
the top; for while we hesitate below, another no abler than we, pushes 
ahead and takes the place we might have reached. But in our strugg- 
ling we must not be guided by mere empty ambition. We must strive 
for some end or object in itself worth attaining. 

The progress of the human race would indeed be slow without 
struggle. Those men who lead a life of inactivity are numbered among 
the useless beings of the earth. These weaklings indeed struggle but 
too faintly to accomplish anything. If they have a purpose in life, they 
do not have self-confidence enough to strive for its attainment. The 
world despises these shiftless beings because they do not aid in the pro- 
gress of the human race. On the other hand the world admires those 
who have a purpose in life. Especially does it admire those who struggle 
sufficiently to succeed. No renowned man has yet won fame at a single 
bound. Fame can never be won without long continued and determined 
struggle. Likewise the bare necessaries of life cannot be obtained with- 
out some effort; and real struggle is required to obtain life's comforts. 
Nature will bestow her favors for the benefit and advancement of the 
human race on none but strugglers. Our progress is measured by the 
amount of effort expended. 

A question each one of us should ask himself is " Do I struggle? " 



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If you and I have not yet struggled we should begin now. It adds 
interest to our work and directs our thoughts into useful channels. It 
makes us feel that we are doing our duty, and thus adds to our happi- 
ness. Our Creator has put us into the world to accomplish some good 
purpose. It is our duty during our lifetime to strive to make the world 
happier and better than it was when we entered it. To do this we must 
set our aim high and do the little as well as the big things of life. Even 
if we cannot struggle for truth and beauty in literature, as Goethe did, 
we at least can devote all our energies to those occupations for which we 
are fitted and struggle at them until we have accomplished our purpose. 
If we do this we deserve to be called men. 

M. R. M. '07 



Announcement to Subscribers 

You will note the new departure from the old system 
of mailing in the fact that the labels bear the date of 
expiration of the subscription. Please notify the Busi- 
ness Manager of any mistakes occurring in the same so 
that they may be corrected. 

We wish that all subscribers in arrears would remit 
the amount in arrears as we need money to run this 
Forum. 

BUSINESS MANAGER. 



THE FORUM 111 

THE FORUM. 

Vol. XIX. FEBRUARY, 1906. No. 5 

Editor ''in-Chief, 

MERLE M. HOOVER, '06. 

Associate Editors, 

A. W. HERRMAN, '07 JOHN C. RUPP, '06 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS '. 
ETHEL MYERS, '07 ERMA SHUPE, '08 

EDWARD E. KNAUSS, '07 M. O. BILLOW, '08 

Business Managers ; 

C. RAY BENDER, '07, Chief. 
ASSISTANTS 

M. O. SNYDER, '06 



The Forum is published each month during the college year by the Students of Lebanon 
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Editorial. 

The question of church union seems to have struck a responsive 
chord in the Church of the United Brethren which we hope will be the 
means of lifting it up out of the conservative path she has always fol- 
lowed and set her along a broader path of sympathy and mutual help- 
fulness to all other Christian denominations. The beginning of this 
month witnessed a meeting which demonstrated how successfully union 
can be advanced when men meet with a spirit of toleration and for- 
bearance. 

The reports that have come from the meeting of delegates of the 
Congregationalist, Methodist, Protestant and United Brethren Churches, 
held at Dayton, Ohio, February 7, lead us to believe that organic union 
is not only possible, but probable. The willingness shown by all to 
yield questions of vital interest in the individual life of each of the 



112 



THE FORUM 



churches represented will surely result in a closer union than the most 
ardent advocate could have hoped for when union was first suggested. 

Nowhere, perhaps, will the benefits of this union be so far-reaching 
and important as in the field of education. And Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege will reap a share of the advantage to be gained by combining the 
three church bodies into one. The field of usefulness of our college will 
be greatly enlarged and the added responsibility of maintaining a high 
standard of efficiency will have to be met. 

To her graduates will be opened the doors of the prominent univer- 
sities and seminaries now under the direction of the other churches 
which will become members of this union. Already the work of her 
graduates has called forth commendation and praise. If Lebanon Val- 
ley is to claim her share of students from the greater field thus opened 
to her the standard of work must be advanced. This is already being 
accomplished and we see no reason why Lebanon Valley College should 
not become one of the greatest of her class in the east. 

* * * 

The Young Men's Christian Association of the College has arranged 
to send several delegates to the International Convention of the Student 
Volunteer Movement which will convene in Nashville, Tenn., from 
February 28 to March 4. They are also planning to send a large dele- 
gation to Northfield, Mass., to the Conference of Student Young Men's 
Christian Associations in June. The Young Woman's Christian Asso- 
ciation will also be represented at Silver Bay. This shows a commend- 
able spirit in our local Christian Associations for it proves that we are 
keenly awake to the necessity of keeping in touch with movements of 
world wide importance. 

One of the arguments in favor of a college education is that it 
broadens the student's view of life. When we consider the narrowness 
of thought of the average uneducated person this is true. But is there 
not, after all, a tendency towards narrowness in the life of a small col- 
lege like our own ? Our college is situated in a small town without 
advantages of those broadening influences which may be found in the 
city, or in other centres of culture. Necessarily then we begin to seek 
those influences within the narrow bounds of our own college walls and 
neglect those of the great world about us. We loose interest in the 
busy world external to the college and bend our efforts towards working 



THE FORUM. 



113 



out the problems which meet us from day to day as college students. 
Outside of the newspaper and the magazine the majority of us have few 
means of keeping in touch with the activities of the outside world, and 
our interests are centered in the affairs of our own college life. While 
this is commendable to a certain extent, yet there is a tendency towards 
narrowness on the part of each one of us. We neglect those influences 
which should be vital to us as citizens of a great nation, in a progressive 
age, full of interests which should be dear to the heart of the true 
students. 

Thus, we are glad when we are able to send some of our students 
to these great gatherings where movements of world wide interest are 
being considered. And we are selfish enough to desire, that they may 
come under these influences, not only for their own welfare, but in 
order that they may bring back to us some of the influences exerted upon 
them there. We wish, through them, to keep in touch with these 
great movements which are universal in their grasp, and that through 
them we may catch some of the inspiration that is prompting such far- 
reaching forces. 

We are sure that the religious life of the college will be revitalized 
when these delegates return to us and bring back to us some of the 
influences which have come to them at Nashville. There ought to be a 
re-awakening in the missionary interests of the college which will result 
in many tangible results toward missionary effort. 

We wish that other phases of college activity, besides the religious, 
would be able to get a larger outlook now and then. We should be 
interested, each one of us, in the great forces of the busy world about 
us. College walls will not shelter us forever. Sooner or later we must 
take our places in the larger activities of our busy world. Therefore 
let us not bind our outlook within the halls of the college, but let us 
keep in touch with forces and influences which are universal. 

* * * 

One need not be a pessimist to see that the educational tendency of 
specialization of the present time, tends to neglect that general know- 
ledge and training which every student should possess, even though his 
efforts are all bent in one particular direction. The less intelligent 
people seem to think that a college graduate ought to be a store-house 
of information. We realize the absurdity of such an idea. But we do 



114 



THE FORUM 



not understand how a student can confine himself to one field alone to 
to the absolute exclusion of all others. Is this narrowing tendency not 
an ill? And does it not need a remedy? Our answer is, yes. And we 
prescribe as a partial cure, at least, a good system of inter-class and 
inter-collegiate debates. 

If, however, this point of the generalization of knowledge, and the 
fact that debating does, as no other mental discipline can, develop the 
originality of the thinker, do not appeal to all our students, there are 
still other reasons why Lebanon Valley ought to have inter-class, and, 
if possible, inter-collegiate debates. 

Students of Lebanon Valley College, our attention has been called 
to this question before. We have left the matter go by default. Will 
we now give it serious consideration ? We ought to for our own sake 
and for the sake of the college. The reputations of educational institu- 
tions are based upon the public achievements of their students. A col- 
lege may do good work without having a commensurate reputation. 
Lebanon Valley prides itself as being in the foremost rank of the smaller 
colleges in this part of the country, when class-room work is taken as a 
standard of comparison. And yet we students do not even try to sub- 
stantiate this claim, when we have an opportunity to do so. 

There are among our number those, who will subject themselves to 
rigid training, and who will endure the hardships of football, in order 
to win a little distinction for our College. Of course, they themselves 
share directly in the honor, but how much more honorable and dignified 
is it to win intellectual fame, than it is to distinguish ones-self by brute 
force. To direct our energies in the direction that we suggest, will not 
cost any sacrifice. 

We make a plea for inter-class debates especially. They will come 
sooner or later. Why not now? The start will have to be made 
sometime. 

Our students are energetic enough, and are abundantly able, to have 
excellent inter-class debates. Several plays are given each college year. 
These plays would not be a hindrance to inter-class debates. Will not 
one of the four classes in the near future challenge one of the other 
three to a debate ? 



THE FORUM 



115 



Alumni Notes 

Mr. C. C. Peters '05 has recently been elected President of Clarks- 
burg College and School of Music, Clarksburg Missouri. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Geyer of Classes '82 and '80 respectively visited 
Mrs. Geyer's father Mr. Rudolph Herr of Main St. 

Rev. E. S. Bowman, '90, of Harrisburg, gave a series of very 
interesting talks to the students of the college during the week of 
prayer. The meetings were instructive and were very well attended. 

Exchange Notes. 

Every department of the Dickinsonian is equally well written. It is 
one of brightest, most interesting and all round papers which we receive. 

The Comus is up to its usual standard, the athletic notes being 
especially well writen. The literary department contains several clever 
short stories. 

The Amulet for January is devoted to the consideration of Edward 
Everett Hale. This seems to us a good idea for is preserves a certain 
interest and unity in the subject which would otherwise be lost. 

"Beyond the Alps Lies Staly " is an exceedingly clever satire in 
the January number of the Hedding Graphic. 

" jessing and German Literature " in the Milton College Review is a 
very interesting and well written article. 

We congratulate the Anchor on its last issue. All the departments 
are well written up. The cover is particularly attractive, indeed the 
improvement is so marked that we would advise you to allow your girls 
to be the permanent editiors. 

" His First Case " in the Delaware College Review is a story above 
the average which one finds in College papers. 

This month's Collegian begins an interesting story of " How Coedu- 
cation because Popular at St Kavin's." This paper would be improved 
by increasing its literary department. 

The Comenian contains a very interesting discussion on " Two sides 
of the Examination Question" Both sides are well supported by argu- 
ments which bear careful study. 

" The changed Attitude to Religion caused by the Developement of 
Science" is a thoughtful, well written article in the Jeffersonian. 

" A Song for Juniata " in the funiata Echo is rather good. 



116 



THE FORUM 



The Week of Prayer 

Dr. E. S. Bowman, of the Otterbein U. B. Church of Harrisburg, 
conducted the prayer meetings during the Students' Week of Prayer. 
His addresses were a help and an inspiration to all. He tried to make 
his addresses as practical as possible and sought to fit his thoughts to the 
needs of the individual student. Although his words bore no direct 
fruit yet so earnest were they that his hearers will ever remember them 
and be better for having heard them. The subject for Monday evening 
was " The Natural, the Carnal and the Spirit-filled Man;" on Tuesday 
night he spoke on the Spirit filled life and gave two beautiful illustrations 
of what such a life means. The first one was illustrative of what life 
means when we shut Christ out. It is as a room filled with sunlight in 
which some one proposes to keep all the sunlight by closing the shutters 
but when they are closed there is no sunlight, and the second illustration 
was of a dew drop, small itself but filled full of the sunlight so that it 
reflected it. That is the spirit filled life; on Wednesday Mr. Bowman 
spoke of " The Three Appearances of Christ " and gave a heart to heart 
talk of their significance to the world; on Thursday night his subject was 
very practical. It was " Alone With God." He gave an illustration 
from his own life how he tried at least three different trades. In neither 
one was he successful and then finally he went before Christ and asked 
Him to guide him in the choice of his life work. It was then that he 
decided on the ministry and although at the time no way seemed open to 
him for a college education yet in time the way was opened. 

His last talk was called the " Life Four Square," and the four divi- 
sions are first, honesty in business, second, purity in private life, third, 
purity in social life and fourth, purity in religion. In closing his remarks 
he said that some people say that people as a rule hold life more dear 
than anything else but he added there are three things dearer than life— 
a woman's virtue, a man's honor and a Christian's faith. 

X X 

College Notes 

Mr. Guy Carleton Lee who was scheduled to lecture here on Jan. 27 
gave his lecture here on Feb. 3. The change of dates came through a 
misunderstanding. The chairman of the Star Course Committee received 
a telegram that the lecturer could not keep his appointment and ten min- 
utes after the audience had been dismissed the lecturer arrived. His lec- 



THE FORUM. 



117 



ture was on the "Man of Sorrows" and was enjoyed by the audience 
generally. 

The joint Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. missionary meeting was 
held on February 4. The leader was Ethel Myers and the theme of the 
meeting was " Barriers at home and abroad." The speakers were Mis- 
ses Edna Yeatts and May Hoerner and Mr. G. M. Reichter. 

The officers of the Philo society for this term are : J. C. Strayer, 
president ; S. H. Waughtel, vice president ; M. O. Billow, recording sec- 
retary ; George C. Dougherty, corresponding secretary ; E. A. Faus, 
pianist ; J. B. Hambright, chaplain and Merle M. Hoover, critic. The 
speakers and essayist have also been chosen for their anniversary on May 
4. Max O. Snyder has been chosen as the presiding officer for the even- 
ing. M. M. Hoover and E. E. Snyder are the first and second orators. 
Andrew Bender has been chosen as the eulogist and J. B. Hambright 
as essayist. 

The officers of the Junior class for the second semester are : Presi- 
dent, M. R. Metzgar ; vice president, Miss Peifer ; secretary, J. Fred 
Miller and treasurer Miss L,ucile Mills. 

The Death league has once more come to life but it has learned to 
mete out justice less sternly than before. The victims were arraigned 
and found guilty but there was no midnight walk to the cemetery. 

On February the second, Professor Karl Jackson gave an at home in 
his rooms in the Men's Dormitory to Prof, and Mrs. Schlichter, Miss 
Baldwin and Mr. Arnold. On the third Professors Jackson and Spessard 
gave an at home to Mrs. T. G. McFadden, Miss Trovillo, Misses Minnie 
Spessard, Reba Lehman, Anna E. Kreider and Ellen and Lucile Mills. 

The Y. W. C. A. entertained the boys at an informal social on Feb- 
ruary the second. The evening was spent in games, both old and new. 
Every one had a pleasant time. 

A Modern Language Club has been formed consisting of the juniors 
and seniors in the Modern Language group under the direction of Prof. 
N. C. Schlichter. Miss Shroyer was elected secretary and Mr. Esben- 
shade and Miss Martin constitute the program committee. Prof. Schlich- 
ter gave an informal talk on Sara Bernhardt and Richard Mansfield at 
their first meeting. 

The Junior class is going to give Sheridan's play "The Rivals," 
some time in April. The following is the caste : Sir Anthony Absolute, 



118 



THE FORUM 



A. W. Herrman ; Captain Jack Absolute, E. E. Knauss ; Faulkland, S. 
H. Waughtel ; Bob Acres, M. F. Lehman ; Sir Lucius O'Trigger, P. F. 
Esbenshade ; Fag, J. F. Miller ; David, J. H. Sprecher ; Thomas, E. M. 
Gehr ; Mrs. Malaprop, Mary Peiffer ; Lydia Languish, Lucile Mills ; 
Julia, Ethel Myers and Effie Shroyer 

The new officers of the freshmen class are : J. Warren Stehman, 
president ; Elizabeth Rechard, vice president ; secretary, May Hoerner 
and treasurer, Deleth Weidler. 

The Kalozetean Literary Society gave a masquerade party on Feb. 
14. There were over one hundred people in costume present. Kalo 
Hall presented a striking appearance, filled with people in both grotesque 
and fantastic costumes. There were costumes of all descriptions, colon- 
ials, cow boys, clowns, Indians, Japanese, milk maids, Red Cross nurses 
and many others. After partners had been found for the Grand March 
by matching tiny red and blue hearts, each guest was given a card which 
was to be filled with the names of those present. The rest of the evening 
was spent in games of various kinds. 

The Glee Club tour during the Easter vacation is as follows : March 
23, at New Cumberland ; March 24, at Mechanicsburg ; March 26, at 
Chambersburg ; March 27, at Shippensburg ; March 28, at Hagerstown ; 
March 29, at Waynesboro. 

The Junior Banquet. 

The Class of 1907 held their Junior Banquet at the Colonial, 
Lebanon, on Friday evening February twenty third. 
The following menu was served at eight-thirty: 
Olives Chow-Chow 
Roast Turkey with Colonial Filling 
Peas Celery Corn 

Stewed Tomatoes Sweet Potatoes 

Colonial Punch 
Mixed Cakes Ice Cream 

Nuts Fruits 
Tea Coffee 
Edward E. Knauss Jr. acted as toast master and each toast was 
received with much applause. The following responded to toasts: 



THE FORUM. 



119 



College Customs A. W. Hermann 

"Oh! how I love the College on the hill." 
If I Were a Freshman Mary Peiffer 

"Of course we were freshmen 

And proud of it too." 

The Ladies M. F. Lehman 

" Here's to the heart that beats for me 

True as the stars above, 
Here's to the day when mine she'll be — 
Here's to the girl I love." 
Auld Lang Syne H. Ethel Myers 

We'll tak a cup o 'kindness yet 
For auld lang syne." 
"Nulla Vestigia Retrorsum" M. R. Metzgar 

Our motto is, "No steps backward." 
A musical program was rendered consisting of Quartets, Duets and 
Solos, after which the members of the class gave the college and class 
yells and returned to Annville on the late car. 

Personals 

Miss Ruth Hershey, after an absence of two months, has again 
resumed her school work. 

Miss Jessie Hoerner, of Mechanicsburg, spent several days with her 
sister, Miss May Hoerner. 

Miss Bessie Moyer, of Millersville State Normal, spent Saturday 
and Sunday, February 3 and 4, with her cousin, Miss Elizabeth Moyer. 

Mr. A. W. Hermann was called home by the death of his father. 

Mrs. Diefenderfer, of Tyrone, visited her daughter, Miss Margaret 
Berlin. 

Mr. Clyde F. Emory and Miss Elsie Maulfair were on the sick list 
during the month with mumps. We are glad to see them out again. 

Miss Louise Oberdick spent a week in York with her grandmother. 

Mr. J. C. McCurdy, former secretary of the Mt. Carmel Y. M. C. 
A., spent January 26, with Mr. J. Warren Kaufmann. 

Misses Elsie and Verna Eshnaur, of Oberlin, spent several days 
with their cousin, Miss Verna Stengle. 

Miss Celia Oldham, who was hurt while out coasting by a collision 
of two coasters, is again able to be about. 

Prof. J. Karl Jackson spent a few days visiting friends in New 
York, during the month. 




120 THE FORUM 

Basket Ball. 

Since the last issue of the Forum, the basket ball team has suffered 
a number of defeats away from home. The team is very anxious to play 
on their own floor and show the students that they are capable of winn- 
ing at home as well as other teams. When two teams of equal strength 
play, the home team always has the advantage on their floor. The boys 
feel confident they can defeat most of the teams they have played thus 
far at Annville and are anxious to demonstrate the fact. The line up 
and score of the different games followed. 

Bucknell 47 I,. V. C. 11 

Lenhart forward Wilder 

Lose forward Knauss 

O'Brien centre Hall 

Wagner guard Maxwell 

Claypool guard Carnes 

Goals from field, Lose 10, Wagner 3, O'Brien 5, Claypool 3, Hall 3, 
Knauss, Lenhart. Goals from foul, Knauss 3, Lenhart 3, Referee — 
Hoskins. Time of halves 20 minutes. 

Bloomsburg 25 I,. V. C. 11 

Weimer forward Waxwell 

Buck forward Knauss 

Schmetz centre Hall 

Long (Titman) guard Carnes 

Dewire (Lynch) guard Wilder 

Goals from field Weimer 3, Bucks 3, Lynch 3, Long, Dewire, Tit- 
man, Knauss 3, Maxwell, Carnes. Fouls, Weimer, Wilder. 20 minute 
halves. 

Susquehanna 18 L. V. C. 7 

Sunday forward Knauss 

(Strohmeyer) forward (Oldham) 

Weaver forward Maxwell 

Shaeffer centre Hall 

Geise guard Carnes 

Benfer guard Wilder 

Goals from field, Geise 3, Sunday 2, Strohmeyer 2, Weaver, Shaffer, 
Maxwell, Knauss, Wilder. Fouls, Wilder. Time of halves 20 minutes. 

State 39 L. V. C. 14 

Moorehead forward (Oldham) Knauss 

Foltz forward Wilder 

Yeckley centre Hall 



THE FORUM 



Healen guard • Maxwell 

Kelmer guard Carnes 

Goals from field, Morehead, Yeckley 6, Healen 5, Kilmer 3, Knauss, 
Maxwell, Wilder 2. Fouls, Moorehead 9, Wilder 6. Time of halves 20 
minutes. Referee, Miller; Time Keepers, Kaufmann and King. 
Lock Haven 21 L. V. C. 2 

Tobias forward (Oldham) Knauss 

Schwopkosky forward (L,udwick) Maxwell 

Brown guard ' Carnes 

Biery guard Wilder 

Miller centre Hall 

Goals from field, Carnes, Tobias 5, Schwopkosky 5, Brown, Miller, 
Fouls Tobias. Referee, Kaufmann; Time Keeper, L,udwick and Henry. 



Rensselaer *\ 
/^Polytechnic^, 
Institute, * 
X Troy, N.Y. 

local examination* Drorlded for. Send lor aOatelojru* 


William H. Kreider 

CLASS OF 1894 

Attorn ey-at- Law 

S. E. Cor. Broad and Chestnut Sts., 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 


Standard Steam Eaundry and 
Scouring ltfork$, 

27 n. 7 Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

ALLEN F. WARD, Class of 1890, Prop. 

Prompt and Good Service Given. 


W.J. Baltzell, Class '84, 

Managing Editor of 

THE ETUDE, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Leading Musical Magazine in the United 
States. 



Lemberger's compound tar Lozenges 

IN BOXES— 25c, 10c and 5c. 

p o r n e l p y ar a e t d LEMBERGER & CO.'S PHARMACY, Lebanon, Pa. 

JOS. L. LEMBERGER, Ph.'M. FRANK GLEIM Ph.G. 



Covnef Jffain and nianheim Streets, 

Annville, Penn'a. 

Alcuays has on Hand a pull Iiine of 



HARRY LIGHT 

UXRUU PRPEH 

RJiO OJINDOm SHADES 

Paper and Shade Hanging a Specialty. 



THE FORUM. 

Tjhe Charm of individuality 

9?^ arks every portrait produced by 

Sates J Studio 



J42 Tforth 8th Street, 
<Discouni to ^Students. 



jCebanon, !Penn'a, 

Spec/at JZates to Ciasses' 



FOR THE LATEST 
AND BEST IN . , . 



HATS 



And MEN'S 
FURNISHINGS 



to Erb & Craumer 



777 Cumb, St, 



LEBANON 



$. m. Sbenk's 
Bakery 

Has always on hand 

J re$b Bread, gake$ ana Rolls 

ANNVILLE, PA, 

One door west of Pennsylvania House. 



R Complete fllusie Store 

PIANOS, - - - ORGANS, 
VIOLINS, - GUITARS, - MANDOLINS, 
BANJOS, SHEET MUSIC and BOOKS. 

Musical Goods of all kinds at Lowest Prices. 
Phonographs and Graphophones from $io to $50. 
15,000 Edison and Columbia Records to select from. 

miller Organ and Piano Co. 

738 Cumberland St., UEBRfiOri, PA. 

pflCTOHV««Highth and maple Sts. 



Jacob Sargent, 

merchant f aflor 



STYLE, FIT and WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED. 



i$-20 IU. main St., Jlnnville. 



IF IN WANT OF 

Books, Stationery, 

FOUNTAIN PENS, FINE WRITING 
PAPER, FANCY GOODS, ALBUMS 
TOILET CASES, CALENDARS, CARDS 
GAMES, PURSES, HOLIDAY GOODS 
or anything kept in an up'tcdate Book 
Store, call or write 

D. P. Witmeyer's Book Store, 

21 S. 8th St., LEBANON, PA. 




The Forum 



MARCH, 1906 



Y 



v 



Lebanon Valley 



College 





WILL & GANTZ, 
Fresh . . . 



Groceries 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



L m. Graybill 



Successor to J. A. DeHuff 



Bookseller 
and Stationer 



Ecttanon, Pemt'a 

A splendid collection of Pictures and 
Novelties suitable for Christmas Presents 
just received and sold at reasonable prices. 



Geo. Krause Hardware Co. 

Hardware 

Headquarters for Athletic Goods, Base Bail Supplies, Tents, Ham- 
mocks. Refrigerators, Etc. 



BICYCLES AND BICYCLE SUNDRIES. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



J. C. Schmidt 

Jeweler 
and Optician 



743-45 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PLNN'A 

GOOD THINGS ONLY AVR GIFTS 
FROM US. Also tidh AIRING. 



* Gal latin * 

Headquarters For 

Tine Confectionery, glwice 
fruits ana Huts. 



RESTAURANT ATTACHED 

Oysters In All Styles 



Why Not? 



BUY YOUR 



10 Per Cent. Discount to Students 

FROM US 

CILLEY & BENNETCH, 



SHOES 



169 North Ninth Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



1 1 



THE FORUM 





ML PUBLISH! 

Annville, Penn'a. 

Publishers of 

The Annville Journal 
The American School 

THE AflERICAN SCHOOL is a new magazine devoted to the 
Interest and Doings of American Schools. 

We want 10,000 Subscribers for this flagazine Until January 
19o6. Send for SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS TO AGENTS. 






College Printing 

Is one of our Specialties 
College Annuals College Catalogues 

All Kinds of College Publications 

Books and Stationery 

Our Shelves Are Constantly Filled With 

New, Secondhand and Shelf'Worn 

School and College 

TEXT BOOKS 



THE FORUM. 



M, A, BLAZIER 

Spares no Pains in Giving His Patrons Polite Attention and Good 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

Which look Artistic and true to life. Reductions to Students 

STUDIO 839 Cumb. St, f LEBANON, PA. 



Established 1856 



DR. ROSS' Sarsaparilla or Blood Pills 

Purify the Blood and Cure Dyspepsia, Indiges- 
tion, Constipation and Liver Complaint. 

Price 25 cents per box. By Mail 011 receipt of Price. 



DR. GEORGE ROSS & CO., 



Opp. Court House, 
LEBANON, IP A.. 



E. B Marshall, M. D., 

No. 34 East Main St., 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



Dr. Kauffman & Seidel 

Oculist, Opticians. 
706 Cumberland Street, Lebanon 



C. E. Rauch, -!?. ' 

Offers Special Discounts 
to Students on 

Merchant Tailoring. 



10th and Cumberland Streets, 
LEBANON, PA. 



fioffman Bros. 



SELL 



ttlalRowr and $oro$i$ 



10 Per Cent, off to Students. 



0pp. Court ijouse, EeDattOlt, Pa. 



THE FORUM 



Catering... 

Weddings DIETRICH'S, 

OUR SPECIALTY 1015 N. Third Street. 225 Market Street. 

Fancy Ices, Cakes, Confections Harrisbtirg, Pa. 

Shipped Anywhere. Correspondence Solicited. 



flnnville Electric Eight 
Company 

Electric Light Electric Wiring 

Electrical Supplies 
ol every description 

annville; 7 < PA. 

Dr. Harry Zimmerman 
Dentist 

Reductions to Students 
72 West Main St., Annville, Pa. 

JOSEPH MILLER, 
Furniture and Undertaking, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Harvey L. Seltzer 

(Formerly with Isaac Wolf) 
Strictly One-Price 

Clothier 

769 Cumberland St., LEBANON, PA. 

FOR SALE 

One subscription to Hapgood's Indus- 
trial Agency. See 

Manager of Forum 



JNO. S. SHOPE 

Queensware 
Groceries Hardware 

LADIES' and GENTS' 

Furnishings 

Discount to Students 

West Main St., Annville, Pa. 
JOSEPH G. KELCHNER 
Butcher 

Daily Meat Market of home dressed meats 
Also a full line of Smoked Meats. 

Annville, * ' Pa. 

W. G WOOLF 

Groceries and Provisions 

65 East Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 

Stephen Hubertis 

BOOK 
BINDER 

320 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 



Contents. 



The Sun and The Wind . . . .121 

Thoughts From The Nashville Convention 122 

Shelley s "Prometheus Unbound" . . 124 

What Happened to George Washington . 129 

Walking With God . . . .133 

Editorial ..... 134 

Exchange Notes . . . . .137 

College Notes .... 138 

The George Crampton Concert Co. . . 139 

Basket Ball 140 

Society Officers . . . . .141 

Personals ..... 142 
Our New President .... 143 

Alumni Notes ..... 143 
Base Ball Schedule .... 144 

As You Like It .... 145 



THE FORUM. 

Volume XIX. MARCH, 1906 Number 6 



The Sun and the Wind 

Fables from La Fontaine 
The wind and the sun saw a traveler who had fortified himself hap- 
pily against bad weather. Autumn had begun, the season when travel- 
ers must be cautious. It is raining, the sun shines, and the rain bow 
warns those people, who go out " in these months that a cloak is very- 
necessary. The Latins call them doubtful on this account. Our traveler 
had then expected rain." With his cloak well lined with strong mate- 
rial, " this fellow, said the wind, thinks he provided for all accidents; 
but he did not for see that I can blow up in such a manner that not a 
button will hold ; if I wish it the cloak will have to go. A contest might 
be amusing to us : shall we have it ? " Alright let us both bet " replied 
the sun. Without so many words, which of us will the sooner strip the 
shoulders of the cavalier we see yonder. Begin, I will let you obscure 
my rays. Nothing more is needed. Our wind on wager, gorged with 
vapors, puffed up like a balloon causes an uproar like a demon's, whis- 
tles, blows, rages, breaks in its passage. Many a worn out roof shatters 
many boats, and all for the sake of a cloak. The cavelier took care to 
keep the storm from being able to engulf his cloak ; the more he tried, 
the more firm was the other ; in vain he worked at the collar and folds. 
As soon as the term of the bet expired, the sun dissolves the cloud, re- 
shines again, and then finally pierces the cavalier, under his long cloak 
he causes him to sweat and forces him to divest himself of it, and yet 
made not use of all his power. Gentleness does much more than violence. 

The Fox and the Grapes 

A certain gascon fox, some say a Norman, almost dying of hunger 
saw on a trellis some grapes, rich and ripe apparently, and covered with 
a vermillion skin. The fellow would have eaten them gladly ; but as 
he was not able to reach them : "They are too green," he said, "and 
good only for fools." Was it not better than to complain ? 

Frances Engine, '05. 



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m 



Thoughts from the Nashville Convention 

HE great convention of the Worlds Student Volunteer Movement 
held at Nashville, Tenn., has already been proclaimed far and 
wide. By thousands of delegates, by hundreds of papers and 
Magazines, and by wire and Cable, the news has reached all 
parts of the world. As expressed by the Religious Telescope, Nash- 
ville was the centre, the heathen world, the circumference, and God was 
the source of inspiration. 

At three o'clock on Wednesday afternoon John R. Mott, chairman 
of the executive committee called the great body to order. The prayer- 
ful earnestness and spiritual zeal that he gave to his opening remarks 
were held throughout all the sessions. He found a watchword for the 
convention in the creed of St. Augustine. ' 'The whole Bible for my guide 
the whole Christ for my savior the whole world for my parish." Mr. 
Mott was followed by Mr. Robert E. Speer who spoke of what we need 
to prepare our lives for the work of Christ. Clearly these two young 
men were the leaders of the great convention and the strong champions 
of the motto that hung above the platform: "The Evangelization of 
the World in this Generation." There was possibly no more impressive 
sight than these two devoted men who had learned the great law of 
Christ for their lives and who were making even the grayhaired men 
about them hope anew that Christ would save even to the uttermost. 

On Thursday Morning Mr. Mott gave a history of The Student 
Volunteer Movement. He spoke of the inauguration of the little band 
of a hundred volunteers at Mt. Herman in 1886 and of the memorable 
Haystack Prayer Meetings at William's College in 1806, thus making 
1906 memorable as a year of two anniversaries of great interest to the 
student world. Mr. Mott traced the history of the Movement through 
the past two decades. The following paragraph of his paper set 
Drth something of what the Student Volunteer Movement stands for, 
what it has done, and what it hopes to do. 

' ' There are few student communities in which the spirit of Missions 
is not stronger and more fruitful because of the work of the Students 
Volunteer Movement. As a result of the visits of its secretaries, the 
training of leaders for student Missionary activities at the various student 
conferences, the promotion of its Mission study scheme, and the pressing 
upon educated young men and women of the claims of the world-wide 



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123 



extension of Christ's Kingdom at its great international conventions and 
on other occasions, the subject of missions has taken a stronger hold on 
the student class of North America than any other theme or undertak- 
ing." 

There is neither time nor space to give even a brief outline of all the 
speakers who came from all parts of every continent. The United 
States, Canada, England, Scotland, Sweden, Italy, Africa, China, India, 
Korea, Japan and the Philippines were represented by speakers. 144 
missionaries were present from 26 different lands. 149 official represen- 
tatives from 49 foreign agencies and 397 special representatives. The 
press was represented by 44 persons and the fraternities by 8. 700 
Universities and Colleges were represented by 3060 students and 286 
professors, making a grand total of 4188 special delegates and represen- 
tatives. This does not include the great numbers of people present 
from Nashville and the surrounding towns who were not registered 
delegates. It is estimated that 19000 persons visited the exhibit and 
possibly many more were present at one or more of the sessions. 

This gives an idea in numbers of the vast proportions to which the 
Student Volunteer Movement has grown, but it can convey little impres- 
sion of the earnestness and fidelity of those who through its influence 
have laid their lives on the altar of sacrifice and have gone to those far 
away heathen people with God's word in their hands and his love in 
their hearts. 

The distrustful public that twenty years ago received the announce- 
ment of the motto of the Volunteer Movement with questioning and 
open disfavor have year by year been won to receive it with increasing 
hope of its fulfilment. It in itself has been as Mr. Mott states: "One of 
the mightiest factors in the influence exerted by the Student Volunteer 
Movement." We were made to feel that those words meant what they 
said, and they were burned into every delegates soul as he saw more 
clearly than ever he did before the great need of Africa, of India, or of 
China as it was shown by those who are working there. To each one 
the evangelization of the world became a real thing. It was a plea for 
life, of rescue from death, a plea for help and sympathy. More and 
more as the convention went on we realized that what we had come for 
was not to look at the geography of the world, but into the eternal face 
of Christ. 

A Delegate 



124 THE FORUM 

Shelley's "Prometheus Unbound." 

HE THEME of Shelley's «' Prometheus Unbound " is taken from 
the old tale of Greek mythology which Aeschylus has incorpor- 
ated in his dramas " Prometheus Bound." The story in brief 
runs as follows : Prometheus, a Titan, stole fire from Jove and 
gave it to man. He sought to endow man with wisdom that he might 
more effectively strive against the powers of evil. For his daring, Jove 
chained the Titan to a rock of Caucasus and caused a vulture to devour 
his ever-renewed heart. Prometheus alone knew a secret which portended 
the fall of Jove. In return for its revelation Jove promised the Titan 
liberation. Prometheus at last bought pardon by revealing the prophecy. 
Hercules killed the vulture and set him free. The secret was, that at 
the time when Jove should marry Thetis, their son, should be mightier 
than his father and the ruler of heaven should lose his power. This 
catastrophe was avoided by marrying Thetis to Peleus. 

In " Prometheus Unbound," Shelley can not conceive of any recon- 
ciliation between the Oppressor and the Champion of mankind. In place 
of the revelation, the Titan, glorying in his strength of will to endure 
torture, endures untold agonies for thousands of years, knowing that in 
time the fall of Jove will certainly take place. This conception is infi- 
nitely more noble and tragic than the other. The Oppressor does finally 
fall, the Titan is liberated and there follows a reign of liberty, love and 
freedom from tyranny. 

Mr. Stopford Brooke says that this poem represents the marriage of 
Shelley's double nature, the fusion for creative work of the lover of man 
and the poet. "He reaches in it that culminating point at which the 
thinker on man gives his best loved materials to the artist, and the artist 
breathes into them life and beauty." This criticism is good, for in no 
other of Shelley's longer poems do we have such wonderful lyric and 
imaginative power combined with such pure ideality. His " passion for 
reforming the world "is at the bottom of the theme, but here his power 
is no longer hampered by his notion that he must directly attack evil as 
he did in the " Revolt of Islam." Mr. Brooke says that into the region 
of pure art, Shelley took all the subjects of the " Revolt of Islam " and 
there in the world of passion and beauty and fire, he wrote " Prometheus 
Unbound." 

Prometheus is the type of the highest perfection, whose moral and 
intellectual nature is impelled by the purest and best motives to the best 




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125 



and noblest ends. He is the Regenerator of mankind who has to contend 
against Jupiter the Usurping Evil One. In [all Shelley's greater work 
there breathes the spirit of the Revolution in its pure ideal. In 
" Prometheus," this ideal is more beautiful, more full of passion and life 
than elsewhere. Mr. Edward Dowden says that in the ' ' Prometheus ' ' 
ages must pass away before the tyrant falls, and the deliverer is unbound, 
but the day of rejoicing is certain, even if it be far off and in the end it 
will come with sudden [glory. All the illusions of the Revolution — its 
perfectibility, its tradition and inheritance, the contrast between benevo. 
lent nature and the selfishness of society are in full vigour in Shelley. 
Also its enthusiasm for humanity, its passion for justice, its recognition 
of a moral element in politics and a sentiment for the brotherhood of man 
— all J:hese ideas are expressed to a greater or a less extent in 
" Prometheus." 

A few citations from the poem will best characterize the mighty 
Titan.— 

" I would fain 
Be what it is my destiny to be, 
The Saviour and the strength of suffering 1 man, 
Or sink into the original gulf of things." 

and again — 

" I would not quit 
This bleak ravine, these unrepentant pains." 
In answer to the furies, he says: 

" Pain is my element, as hate is thine" 
" Yet am I king over myself and rule 
The torturing and conflicting throngs within." 
***** 
" Pity the self -despising slaves of Heaven, 
Not me, within whose mind sits peace serene, 
As light in the sun throned." 
Of him, Panthea says : 

" The Titan looks as ever, firm not proud " 

and Mercury, 

" Wise art thou, firm and good " 
while the Earth says 

" Subtle thou art and good ; and though the Gods 
Hear not this voice, yet thou art more than God 
Being wise and kind." 

These lines tell us something of the Titan's noble nature. His every 
word is full of strength. He has that inner consciousness of right which 



126 



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brings peace in spite of torture. The words of the various Voices and 
Spirits of the drama are witnesses to the strength of the Titan, which 
however is best revealed in his own words. 

Perhaps the all powerful element in the Titan's strength is love. Not 
only does he feel great love for humanity, in that he suffers thousands of 
years for their sake but he feels love for the Sea-nymphs and all the good 
spirits of his own world. It is their response, their ever-enduring love 
and fidelity which enables him to endure his pain and remains a constant 
balm to his spirit. In the following lines he speaks of love, 

" I wandered once with Asia, drinking life from her loved eyes " 
again — 

" How fair these air-born shapes ! and yet I feel 
Most vain all hope but love, and thou art far 
Asia ! who, when my being overflowed, 
Wert like a golden chalice to bright wine 
Which else had sunk into the thirsty dust." 
and of Asia, again 

" Asia, thou light of life, 

Shadow of beauty, unbeheld, and ye 

Fair sister nymphs, who made long years of pain 

Sweet to remember, through your love and care." 

The whole atmosphere of the second and fourth acts, including the 
songs of Panthea, and of Asia is permeated by love. The effect of love 
is idealized in the following lines : — 

" Man, one harmonious soul of many a soul, 
Whose nature is its own divine control, 
Where all things flow to all, as rivers to the sea ; 
Familiar acts are beautiful through love ; 
Labor, and pain, and grief, in life's green grove 
Sport like tame beasts, none knew how gentle they could be ! 
His will, with all mean passions, bad delights, 
And selfish cares, its trembling satellites, 
A spirit to guide, but mighty to obey, 
Is as a tempest-winged ship, whose helm 
Love rules, through waves which dare not overwhelm, 
Forcing life's wildest shores to own its sovereign sway. 

In this poem Shelley's ideas regarding love are probably best incor- 
porated. With him, law was everywhere at odds with love and in a 
reign of law it must disappear. 

Aside from his ideas of love, Shelley gives us his philosophy of the 
present and the future life in a few lines. 



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127 



" Death is the veil which those who live call life ; 
They sleep, and it is lifted " — 

again — 

" Yet pause, and plunge 
Into Eternity, where recorded time, 
Even all that we imagine, age on age 
Seems but a point — 
For a philosophy akin to Shakespeare's we have 

" Methinks I grow like what I contemplate 
And laugh and stare in loathed sympathy." 

and — 

" Evil minds 
Change good to their own nature." 
We must go no further without pointing out a few of the most ex- 
quisite imaginative and lyric lines. The second and fourth Acts are 
richest in these ; there, are found the songs of greatest sweetness, though 
there are few lines in the whole poem that do not express rare lyric 
quality. The adaptation of the line to the character speaking it is won- 
derful. Thus, in the lines of the Titan we feel strength, dignity, com- 
posure ; in the songs of the nymphs and the choruses we feel a lyrical 
sweetness which is unsurpassed by any of the authors' best short lyrical 
poems, for example, 

" See where the child of Heaven, with winged feet, 
Runs down the slanted sunlight of the dawn." 
and that song of the fourth spirit, beginning 
" On a poet's lips I slept 
Dreaming like a love adept." 
In speaking of the Spirits which have fled, these lines of Panthea are 
exquisite — 

" Only a sense 
Remains of them, like the omnipotence 
Of music, when the inspired voice and lute 
Languish, ere yet the responses are mute, 
Which thro' the deep and labyrinthine soul, 
Like echoes thro' long caverns, wind and roll." 
At the beginning of Act II, the words of Asia as she awaits Pan- 
thea' s coming contain as exquisite nature description as any lines in the 
poem. 

" At sunrise thou shouldst come, sweet sister mine. 
Too long desired, too long delaying, come ! 
How like death worms the wingless moments crawl ! 
The point of one white star is quivering still 
Deep in the orange light of widening morn 



128 THE FORUM 

Beyond the purple mountains ; thro' a chasm 

Of wind-divided mist the darker lake 

Reflects it ; now it wanes ; it gleams again 

As the waves fade, and as the burning threads 

Of woven cloud unravel in pale air ; 

'Tis lost ! and thro' yon peaks of cloud-like snow 

The roseate sunlight quivers ; hear I not 

The Aeolian music of her sea-green plumes 

Winnowing the crimson dawn ? " 
It was in Italy that Shelley wrote ' ' Prometheus. ' ' The unusual 
imaginative power and poetic truth revealing itself in the highly im- 
pressionistic portrayal of nature that we find here may well have been 
inspired by the author's sojourn in this land unrivalled for its beauty. 

There is much in the ' ' Prometheus ' ' which to me seems vague and 
almost incapable of comprehension. Yet with frequent reading the hidden 
meaning of many a line comes more and more to light. In the end it 
usually reveals a beautiful truth. Such intensity of emotion and passion, 
such rare beauty of imagery and music of verse, combined with purity of 
ideal and loftiness of theme elevate the work to the height of nineteenth 
century poetic creation. If we judged Shelley by this poem, alone, he 
would certainly be among the foremost of English poets. However 
much his theories of life may have been impracticable for modern life 
his ideals are surely the highest. I,ines 561 to the end of " Prome. 
theus " embody not only the elements of a perfect state, which elements 
were individualized in the Titan, but they are the ideals of Shelley, ex- 
pressed with a vigor and beauty rarely equalled by any poet. 

Bessib Troviu/). 



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129 



What Happened to George Washington 

ILUAM PENN Jenkins, alias " Billy " Jenkins, wiggled his 
toes reflectively as he sat in the shade of the old willow tree 
down by the " fishin' hole " behind the barn. His fishing 
rod lay neglected by his side its end tipping into the water in 
a very unsportsmanlike manner. A little farther down the stream his 
cork bobbed up and down in the eddies, unnoticed. Evidently " Billy " 
was not in a fishing mood. But where is the boy who could be in such 
a mood under the circumstances ? When an army, a real live army, is 
encamped within three miles of a boy's home, it would not be strange if 
his thoughts would turn thither often, even if he is a Quaker boy, taught 
to despise all thoughts of warfare. 

But we must confess that Billy's thoughts were not very Quaker 
like as he sat there day-dreaming by the side of the water. If Billy's 
father, now some ten miles away at a meeting of Friends, would have 
known the thoughts coursing through his son's mind, it would have 
greatly shocked the father's good Quaker heart, and upon his return, 
would have called down upon Billy's head, a good solid lecture full of 
11 thees " and " thous." But Billy after all was only a boy, a real flesh 
and blood boy, with a boy's heart and above all a boy's imagination, and 
he could give that imagination full play, when the Continental army was 
encamped only three miles away down by " The Forge." 

Billy moved restlessly. It certainly was trying to a boy full of 
spirit, even to a Quaker boy, meek and humble, to be left in charge of 
the farm while his father and mother were away at meeting, especially 
when over the ridge, and sometimes Billy imagined that he could see it, 
lay encamped Washington's army. It is no wonder that fishing was 
tame sport then, and it is no wonder that now and then he arose, squared 
his shoulders and saluted, "Rightabout, face " said Billy, and in the 
mirror of the pool his image saluted in return. Then reminded of his 
Quaker principles he seated himself and again gathered up his neglected 
fishing rod. But it was no use, the temptation was too strong. 

He arose and quickly wound up his line upon his rod. Then he 
emptied the contents of his bait box, a slimy wriggling mass, into the 
center of the pool, as feast for the fishes, and then, his fishing rod trail- 
ing behind him, he went back to the barn. 

Soon Billy could be seen, shoulders back, head up, his fishing rod 




130 



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over his shoulder, marching backward and forward in the dusty road in 
front of the barn. " Right about face " said Billy, saluting his following 
of imaginary soldiers. Billy was drilling, Billy a Quaker boy. 

But suddenly there came to his ears a faint noise, a queer muffled 
sound, but it did not seem strange to Billy, for he evidently recognized 
it as familiar. His face lighted up with a new resolution. He clapped 
his hands and shouted, "I have it George Washington." He vaulted 
over the low stone barn yard fence scattering the hens gathered upon the 
other side in a noisy rout. He went up to the large straw stack in front 
of the barn and pulling aside some straw entered apparently into its 
depths from which the queer sounds now came with redoubled force. 

After a few seconds Billy reappeared, went to the large cherry tree 
in the corner of the barn yard, climbed to its highest limb, and took a 
careful survey of the country up and down the road. Then he descended, 
re-entered the stack, and in a few moments again appeared, but this time 
leading by a chain about his neck, George Washington, not the general 
to be sure, but George Washington, Billy's pet calf, the pride of his 
heart, a calf just now entering into that age when the appearance of 
short, knobby horns gave him the assurance of new found strength. He 
blinked his eyes solemnly in the sunlight, for George Washington had 
been a prisoner. By all the laws of nature he should have been kicking 
up his heels, and enjoying the sunshine and fresh grass of the back lot, 
but alas, by the laws of war he was compelled to spend his days in the 
depth of the straw stack. For above all things the Continental army de- 
sired beef, and anything that looked like a cow was quickly confiscated 
by the hungry soldiers. Hence Billy had found this ingenious hiding 
place for his boon companion, who now in frantic efforts to show his 
appreciation almost upset his rather deminutive master. 

But Billy was filled with a strong resolution. He snatched up a 
pitch fork standing by the gate and led the astonished George Washing- 
ton out into the middle of the dusty road. Soon his purpose became 
evident, for, watching his opportunity, he nimbly sprang upon the back 
of the non-plussed animal. And he staid then, for no matter how franti- 
cally, George Washington backed and bucked, his rider clung to him 
with all the strength of his arms and legs. Soon, however, the calf be- 
came quiet, probably because he realized that the weight of his rider was 
not so much after all, and more probably because he had noticed some 
particularly luscious grass which he now began to eat with the gusto of 



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131 



one long deprived of such a luxury. Billy wiped his hot brow with the 
back of his shirt sleeve and proudly sat erect. He was conqueror. He 
straightened up, waved his fork at his imaginary followers. "Right 
about face " shouted Billy. He was a veritable Don Quixote. 

But he must find the enemy. It would be no fun if there were no 
British soldiers to fight. " Ah there they are." Directly in front of him 
was the stone wall of Mother Jenkins's well stocked kitchen garden and 
peeping over the wall in a glaring crimson line, was a row of red holly- 
hocks nodding proudly in the summer breeze. Billy turned to his im- 
aginary followers, pointed his fork at the line of crimson tufts above the 
garden wall and shouted imperiously, ' 1 Right about face, charge the red 
coats. ' ' 

But somehow George Washington did not partake of the warlike 
enthusiasm of his little master. He was eating grass and no doubt his 
thoughts were anything but warlike. No matter how much Billy would 
kick, the calf would not budge an inch towards the wall. Billy 
straightened up with a look of despair upon his freckled face. The 
hollyhocks nodded defiantly behind the garden wall. Then it was that 
Billy made a fatal mistake, for turning and saluting his followers, he 
raised his fork and brought it down, point first, upon George Washington's 
flank. Then came the catastrophe. Billy gathered himself up, about 
half ready to cry, limped, and then rubbed the dust out of his eyes in 
time to see George Washington tearing madly down the road. But 
Heavens ! he was not charging a line of red hollyhocks this time but in 
the distance an irregular line of buff and blue was just turning into the 
road. Billy's heart sank within him as he groaned out the words " The 
Continentals." Then Billy sat down and wept. 

Nor could you blame him, for looking through his tears he saw 
George Washington meet the line and go clear through it. He heard 
the soldiers shout with laughter and saw them in pursuit of the unfortu- 
nate calf disappear in a cloud of dust. George Washington was headed 
straight for the Continental camp. Billy was in despair. What should 
he do ? Then he thought of the anger of his father, who like all Quaker 
parents was somewhat strict, and this thought nerved him to make a 
quick resolution. He would go to the camp in search of his calf. The 
camp was full of untold dangers to him, but then — "Well he would 
rather face three armies than the anger of his father when he would 
learn of the loss of George Washington." It was now noon but without 



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going into the house to eat the dinner which Mother Jenkins had pre- 
pared for him before leaving, he set out down the hot, dusty road 
towards the camp. 

When he had gone about two miles, plodding along, filled with ap- 
prehension and anxiety concerning his pet, a soldier in uniform suddenly 
stepped out from behind a tree. " Halt ! " said he. Billy was struck 
dumb with terror. " Was he going to be shot ? " Notwithstanding his 
rather stern command the soldier's eye softened, and as Billy was too 
badly scared to explain, he said : " Well my boy, whom do you want ? " 
"I want George Washington sir, if it please thee" answered Billy. 
"Whew," said the man, "Washington?" "Yes sir" replied Billy. 
There must have been something in the boy's look which removed all sus- 
picion from the soldier's mind for he called to a comrade standing near, 
"Here John, conduct this boy to headquarters." Billy supposed of course 
that headquarters was where they kept their cattle so he followed with- 
out question. He was led through the rows of tents, and between lines 
of irregularly drilled soldiers, to a large tent in the center of the camp 
before which a flag was waving. ' 1 Here you are my boy ' ' said his es- 
cort and then left him. Billy walked up to the tent and saw seated 
within, at a table, writing, a grave, dignified looking man in uniform. 
The man looked up and in a kindly manner said : "Well my son?" 
" I want George Washington sir " answered Billy humbly. " I am he " 
said the soldier. Suddenly Billy caught an inkling of the truth. " Why- 
I-don't-want-thee,-I-want-George- Washington, -he' s-a-calf " he stam- 
mered, then realizing that he was before the greatest man of his time, 
astonished and embarrassed, he began to cry as if his heart would burst. 

Slowly General Washington drew from the sobbing boy his story, 
and then calling an aid he smilingly gave an order. The general turned to 
his writing and Billy sobbed and sobbed. But soon a commotion was heard 
in the camp. The sound of laughter came nearer and nearer and then 
the noise of a struggle was heard outside the tent. Billy raised his 
head, and there was George Washington, his calf, frantically trying to 
escape from several laughing soldiers. 

" Is that your calf?" asked the general, "Yes sir," said Billy, "I 
thank thee " and he threw his arms about his old friend who seemed to 
be glad to meet his master. Billy was turning away with his calf when 
the general handed him a paper. " Keep this, my son " said he. 



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133 



I have been told that the two reached home in safety, and that 
George Washington was securely hidden in the depth of the strawstack 
when Father and Mother Jenkins returned from meeting late that evening, 
and I am told that it was not until long afterward that Billy told them 
the story of his adventures. 

George Washington, the calf, has long ago been gathered to 
his fathers. Billy, now great great grandfather William Jenkins, has 
been dead these many years, but upon the wall of an old mansion not far 
away, hangs a treasure, For in a gold frame there is an old, soiled, crum- 
pled paper which reads as follows: — 

"To whom it may concern: This is to certify that George Wash- • 
ington, calf, being a Quaker calf, is from henceforth exempt from all 
military duty. Signed George Washington, 

General commanding the Continental troops, 

Valley Forge, August 17, 1776 



Walking With Cod. 



O Master, let me walk with thee 
In lowly paths of service free; 
Tell me thy secret; help me bear 
The strain of toil, the fret of care. 

Help me the slow of heart to move 
By some clear, winning word of love; 
Teach me the wayward feet to stay 
And guide them in the homeward way. 

Teach me thy patience! still with thee 
In closer, dearer company: 
In work that keeps faith sweet and strong; 
In trust that triumphs over wrong; 

In hope that sends a shining ray 
Far down the future's broadening way; 
In peace that only thou canst give, 
With thee, O Master let me live. 

— Washington Gladden in The Watchword. 



134 THE FORUM 

THE FORUM. 

Vol. XIX. MARCH, 1906. No. 6 

Editor-in-Chief, 

MERLE M. HOOVER, '06. 

Associate Editors, 

A. W. HERRMAN, '07 JOHN C. RUPP, 'o6 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS : 
ETHEL MYERS, '07 ERMA SHUPE, 'OS 

EDWARD E. KNAUSS, '07 M. O. BILLOW, '08 

Business Managers : 

C. RAY BENDER, '07, Chief. 
ASSISTANTS 

M. O. SNYDER, '06 

The Forum is published each month during the college year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College. 

TERMS :— Subscription Price, 60 cents a Year. Single Copy, 10 cents. 

All business matter should be addressed to The Forum, Annville, Pa. ; all literary matter to 
Merle M. Hoover, Annville, Pa. 

Subscribers failing to receive The Forum regularly will please notify us promptly. 

Subscribers who have changed their residence would confer a great favor by notifying us of the 
change, giving both the old and new address. We can not be held responsible for any irregularity if 
this is neglected. 

Once a subscriber, always a subscriber, until notice for discontinuance, accompanied with all 
arrearages, has been received. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as second-class mail matter. 

Editorial. 

We are glad to welcome among us our new President, Rev. A. P. 
Funkhouser. He is a man of sterling Christian character, is tactful, 
resourceful and is a thorough business man. He is a man of wide ex- 
perience and is just the one we need at the head of the institution to 
pilot it through the trying circumstances in which it is now placed. We 
trust also that each student will find in Rev. Funkhouser, a true, sympa- 
thetic friend. We are sure that we will not be disappointed in this. 

The institution is receiving a " trying out" at the present time, 
such a testing time as necessarily comes to all institutions, and to all per- 
sons, at some time or other. At such a time much must depend upon the 
one who is in charge of the institution. We are sure that Dr. Funk- 
houser is equal to the occasion, and that the college will now move on 
towards success. 



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135 



However, if we wish to make his work easier and to share with him 
in winning success for the college, it is necessary that he receives the co- 
operation of every student. We have a good, strong, loyal student 
body and if we give to the new president our support and sympathy we 
are sure that he will appreciate our efforts no matter how humble they 
may be. If there is anything which might hinder us from giving him 
our hearty support, now is a good time to get rid of it. Let us give him 
only our best efforts and our truest sympathy and we are sure that he 
will yet make out of this year the most successful in its history. 

We expect much of our new president, but he also has the same 
right to expect much of us. So let us get shoulder to shoulder and help 
in every way we can and we are sure that he will not reject our efforts. 
The new president's regime must bring brighter days for Lebanon Valley 
College. As students we are glad to welcome him and we assure him 
that he will receive from us true honor and sympathy. 

* * * 

Bask bau, practice will be started in a few days. The outlook for 
a successful base ball season is hopeful. Manager Hambright has ar- 
ranged a nice schedule, and it is now up to the students more so than to 
the manager how well that schedule is to be carried out. We must have 
a large number of candidates for the several teams. 

Our base ball equipment is all that can be desired, and our athletic 
field is one of the best in this state. Such things as these ought to ap- 
peal even to those who are the least inclined to try for any of the teams. 
There also are peculiar conditions at Lebanon Valley that make it poss- 
ible for all base ball men to have equal chances for advancement. This 
is not absolutely the case at all colleges. 

There is considerable base ball material in the College, the greater 
part of which needs developing. This will make it interesting for the 
candidates to secure their positions, for they will have to work to get 
them. It is fortunately true that not all the candidates can make the 
'varsity. Some must play on the scrub teams, but there are always 
scrubs, who are making it pretty lively for 'varsity men to keep their 
positions. Base ball men are made, not born. A scrub is not doomed to 
remain a scrub, for his progress, if there be any, is always watched, and 
if he shows up better than a 'varsity man, he will soon replace him. 
Scrub men are always recruits for the 'varsity. 



136 



THE FORUM 



We should like to see many more of our hard working students try 
for the base ball teams than have tried for the other athletic teams ear- 
lier in the year. They would help to purify athletics by driving out the 
tramp athlete, who has been accused by high authorities of being the 
underminer of college sports. However, conditions in this respect at 
Lebanon Valley are not nearly so bad as at many other Colleges, but yet 
we have had experiences with him. 

When a call for candidates is made, let us see how many will res- 
pond. From present indications, we can predict a large number, but 
Manager Hambright wants as many as possibly can to come out for the 
teams. 



The meeting of College Presidents on Saturday afternoon, March 
3, was attended by representatives of Dickinson, Muhlenberg, Washing- 
ton and Jefferson, Swathmore, Ursinus, Franklin and Marshall, Lehigh, 
Bucknell, and University of Pennsylvania. The purpose of the meeting 
was to discuss questions of interest to the colleges and indeed to the 
educational world in general. 

In the medical schools of the country the college work is, as a rule, 
not recognized at present, even when pursued with the intention of 
taking the medical course. This unfortunate state of affairs has made it 
almost impossible for many persons to take both courses, even when 
they recognize the necessity for it and also the great value a general 
college course would be to them in their work. The work of the college 
is recognized in almost every other special field and why it should not 
be recognized in medical schools is indeed unaccountable. To say the 
least it is very short-sighted and unwise. If those taking medical pre- 
paratory work at other colleges would be admitted to medical schools 
and given proper credit for their work there would be a large increase 
of those who would take the college course before entering a medical 
school. In discussing this question Dean Penniman of the University 
of Pennsylvania said that he could make no assurance that this evil 
would be remedied. 

Then followed a general discussion of the question of entrance to 
college by certificate. This developed into a very interesting discussion 
and many valuable points were brought forth by the speakers. The 
question of football was tackled and after having thoroughly debated the 



THE FORUM. 



137 



subject resolutions were passed commending the reforms sug- 
gested by the convention held in New York city some time since. 
Many institutions have already adopted soccer football and as it is 
generally reported successful there must be some radical changes in 
the older game or it will be supplanted by soccer football. 

Exchange Notes. 

The Lesbian Herald contains this month a very creditable poem en- 
titled " Fulfilment." " Carlyle's French Revolution " also bears careful 
study. 

The contest number of The Anchor is very readable and contains 
much valuable material. 

1 1 He who inside his watch lid wears 
His sweetheart's pretty face, 
Is sure to have a time, for there's 
A woman in the case." — Ex. 
The cover on The Comus is very striking and does not belie the in- 
teresting contents of this bright paper. 

The Otterbein Aegis has some well written editorials this month. 
The Gates Index contains a rather good poem, " The Prophecy of 
the Class of 1906." 

Read 1 ' A Plea for English Grammar * ' in The Susquehanna this 
month. 

The Dickinsonian is one of the brightest, newsiest papers on our ex- 
change list. 

" Mutability " in The Ursinus Weekly is good. 

The Criterion is certainly to be congratulated on the number and 
merit of its short stories this month. 

We are glad to receive The Campbell College Charta and we wish to 
it long and continued success. 

All of the departments of The State Collegian are well managed and 
well edited. 

Longfellow's ' The Day is Done ' " in The Delaware College Re- 
view is a very sympathetic study of this well loved poem. 



138 



THE FORUM 



A bunch of " English Themes by Freshies " make interesting read- 
ing in the Milton College Review. 

" Alfred the Great, His Services to Literature and Civilization" 
in The Comenian is well written. 

The discussion of Self Government in The Vassar Miscellany is very- 
fine and we wish that all of our readers could see it. This paper is so 
far above and beyond all the others which we receive that it is an educa- 
tion to see to what a high standard a college paper can be raised. 

College Notes 

The Freshman Elocution class taught by Prof. J. K. Jackson gave a 
public program in the . auditorium of the Library Building. The pro- 
gram consisted of recitations, dialogues, a patomine and a farce. 
Special music was rendered and the program throughout was of the 
highest order. 

Prof. Oldham entertained Misses Trovillo and Moyer and Prof. 
Jackson at dinner on Washington's birthday. 

During the week of February 19, Rev. Zuck the College pastor, 
Rev. E. H. Gerhart of the First Evangelical Lutheran Church and Rev. 
W. F. De Long of Christ's Reformed Church addressed the students in 
Chapel. 

The C. L. S. entertained both boys' societies recently in their hall 
in the Ladies Dormitory. Imprompter programmes were rendered be- 
cause the faculty would not allow the rendition of more than one joint 
Session programme a year. 

Mrs. N. C. Schlichter lectured to the Modern Language Club at her 
home on February 24, on the subject "Reminiscences of Paul Lawrence 
Dunbar. ' ' 

The Siegel-Meyer-Reed Company entertained a large audience on 
on February 24 with a pleasing programme. This company appeared as 
the fourth number of the Star Course. 

The Glee, Mandolin and Guitar Clubs gave a concert in Lebanon 
on February 28, under the auspices of the 1906 Class of Lebanon High 
School. 



THE FORUM 



139 



Over thirty five dollars were obtained for the Athletic Association by 
means of a basket social held March i, in the old library room, by the 
friends and students of Lebanon Valley. The price of baskets averaged 
over $1.50 

Dr. D. R. Miller of the Dayton Biblical Seminary addressed the 
students in chapel on March 1. 

S. F. Pauxtis captain of the base ball team tried out a number of 
candidates for positions on the team. The practice consisted of batting 
and light fielding practice. May the season be a successful one. 

Treasurer W. C. Arnold was confined to his rooms during the week 
of Feb 29 because of sickness. 

The most closely contested game of the season was played February 
24, when the fat men were defeated by the lean men by a score of 17-16. 
The game was exciting throughout the score being repeatedly tied 
Richter excelled for the lean men while Emery played well for the fat 
men. 

The Sophomore Class recently issued a challenge to any other class 
in the school for an interclass debate. This is something in which Leb- 
anon Valley is lacking and interclass debates should be started prepara- 
tory to intercollegiate debates. Let us hope that the challenge will be 
accepted. 

J. B. Showers and M. O. Billow were the two representatives from 
Lebanon Valley to the Nashville Missionary Convention and returned 
March 8. 

X X 

The George Crampton Concert Company 

The George Crampton Concert Company, entertained a crowded 
house in the College Chapel on March 10. The programme served as a 
climax for the series of star course programmes which were rendered 
here this season under the auspices of the Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. 
Every one has been of a high order and the programme committee deserve 
special credit for the excellency of the companies who played here. The 
George Crampton Concert Company consisted of George Crampton, 
Basso Cantante; Theodore Du Manlin, celloist, Mrs. Foster Merrill, 
Pianist and Accompanist. 



140 



THE FORUM 



Basket Ball 

The basket ball team was defeated at York by the Y. M. C. A. team 
on March 3, by a score of 27-11. This team is one of the fastest in the 
state and the lowness of the score indicates the work of the locals. Leb- 
anon Valley's score was the lowest score made by an opposite team on 
on the York floor this season and was undoubtly the best game played 
by the locals this year. The line up: — 

York Position L. V. C. 

Weimer forward Wilder 

( Evans ) 

Kaufmann forward Knauss 

Barnes centre Hall 

Susong guard Carnes 

Morrison guard Oldham 

Goals from field Susong 5, Evans 3, Kaufmann 2, Barnes 2, Weimer, 
Wilder, Hall, Carnes, Oldham. From foul Wilder 3, Referee Baughman. 
Time of halves 20 minutes. 

Auther defeat was added to the long string on March 5 in the town 
hall. Susquehanna defeated l,. V. C. by a score of 26-9. 

The cause of this defeat was the illness of Maxwell and Wilder. 
Wilder could not start the game and Maxwell had to retire after playing 
several minutes. The line-up and score. 



position 
forward 
forward 



Susquehanna 
Weaver 
Sunday 



I,. V. C. 
Knauss 
Maxwell 

( I,udwick ) 
Hall 
Carnes 
Oldham 

Goals 
Weaver 3, 
Appenzellar. 
minutes. 

The Freshman Sophmore game was played March 10, in the town 
hall before a large crowd of enthusiastic rooters, who yelled themselves 
hoarse for their respective teams. The first half ended with the score 5- 
4 in favor of the sophomores. In the second half the Freshmen could 



centre Shaffer 
guard Gerse 
guard Yoke 
from field, Carnes, Hall Maxwell, Ludwick, Sunday 3, 
Sunday 5, Geise. From foul Shaeffer, Knauss. Referee 
Time Keepers Teufel and Pauxtis, Time of halves 20 



THE FORUM 



141 



not stand the fast gait and as a result the "Sophs" won 23.10. For 
the "Sophs" Capt. Ludwick and Oldham aided materially in winning 
the game while Capt. Carnes and Richter played a strong game for the 
Freshmen. 

The line-up and Score: 
Freshmen Position Sophomores 

Carnes (Saylor) forward Ludwick 

Emery forward Oldham 

Kreider (Carnes) centre Appenzellar 

Richter guard Guyer 

Pickard guard Hartz 

Goals from field, Ludwick 5, Oldham 4, Appenzeller 2, Carnes 2, 
Emery. From foul Oldham, Carnes 4. Time keepers, Pauxtis and 
Hodges. Refrree Wilder. 20 minute halves. 

The basket ball Season is now over and although the team won 
comparatively few games never-the-less they made some creditable scores 
Lebanon Valley needs a gymnasium to develope her teams and the want 
of this handicapped the team considerably. E. E. Knauss was elected 
to captain the team next year. 

X X 

Society Officers 

The Y. W. C. A. have elected the following officers for the ensuing 
year. President, Ethel Myers; Vice President, Alice Zuck; Cor. 
Secretary, Elizabeth Rechard; Rec. Secretary, Edna Yeatts; Treasurer, 
May Horner; Pianist, Alice Lutz. 

The Clionian officers for the spring term are; President, Effie 
Schroyer; Vice President, Elizabeth Stehman; Rec. Secretary, Sallie 
Kreider; Cor. Secretary, Nettie Showers; Chaplain, May Horner; 
Critic, Ora Harnish; Pianist, Elva Cunkle; Treasurer, Neda Knaub. 

The Kalo officers recently elected are: President, P. M. Spangler; 
Vice President, E. E. Knauss, jr.; Critic, C. R. Bender; Censor, S. R. 
Oldham Rec. Secretary, J. W. Stehman, Cor. Secretary, G. E. Richter; 
Treasurer, C. E. Shenk; Sar. at Arms, W. O. Ellis; Editor W. E. 

h 4 ^ # • . x o Ruoo . pi an i st K. Ludwick. 



142 



THE FORUM 



Personals 

Mr. J. W. Kauffman gave a missionary address to the Duke St. M. 
E. Sunday School York, Pa., on March 4. 

J. B. Hambright spent several days at his home in Lancaster County 
during the week of Feb. 26. 

Mr. B. M. Singer, who was dangerously ill at college with pneu- 
monia, has left for his home in Elizabeth town. After he has had suf- 
ficient time to recuperate he will again return to college to resume his 
studies. 

Mr. W. A. Dempwolf spent some time in renewing acquaintance at 
college. 

C. W. Shoop was called to his home in Halifax because of the illness 
of his father, but was able to return to Annville in several days. 

Mr. Jere Collins, a member of this year's foot ball team and now 
employed at Steelton, is recovering from serious illness. 

I. S. Seitz recently accepted a call as pastor of Reinoehlsville M. E. 
Church. 

G. E. Richter preached at Sinking Springs on Mar. 4. 

Messrs. Wilder and Carnes visited Mr. Jere Collins at Steelton a 
short time ago. 

Miss Freda Clausen, of Steelton, and Miss Esther Engle, of Hum- 
melstown, were the guests of Verna Stengle and Elizabeth Engle on 
Washington's Birthday. 

Prof. N. C. Schlichter delivered an address on March 9, before the 
Lebanon County Teacher's Association at Lebanon on "The Teacher 
and Shakespeare." 

Dr. Hervin U. Roop sailed on Wednesday, Feb. 28, for Liverpool on 
the Oceanico. He expects to make a tour of Great Britain and the conti- 
nent. 

Sunday, March 2, was spent by Ruth Beam and Erma Shupe at the 
former's home at Intercourse and by Verna Stengle and Verda Snyder at 



THE FORUM 



143 



Our New President 

Rev. A. P. Funkhouser, A. M., of Harrisonburg, Virginia, was 
elected president of the college on March 9, by the Executive Committee 
of the board of Trustees. Mr. Funkhouser was at one time a student at 
Lebanon Valley but is an alumnus of Otterbein University. He has 
served as presiding elder of his Conference, as associate editor of ' 1 The 
Religious Telescope," as postmaster of Harrisonburg and as president of 
Western College, now the Leander Clark College at Toledo, Iowa. Be- 
sides this Mr. Funkhouser is a forceful public speaker and all things put 
together make the prospect for Lebanon Valley under his guidance very 
bright. 

Alumni Notes 

Dr. A. P. Funkhouser, has been elected president of the College. 
He addressed the students in chapel Friday morning, Mar. 16. 

Miss Lulu May Clippinger, of Chambersburg, has written a very 
splendid article on "A Visit to Paul Dunbar,, which appeared in The 
Watchword for March 1906. 

We are glad to learn through a Kansas paper that Mr. Walter 
Esbenshade, of Campbell College, is getting along finely with his work 
there. 

Among the Alumni of *our College who were at Nashville for the 
late convention we note the following : Prof. W. G. Clippinger, of the 
U. B. Seminary, Dayton, O. ; S. F. Dougherty, a senior at the Seminary; 
Chas. Fisher, of Columbia University ; Mrs. Albert, of Dayton, O., and 
Donald Cowling from Yale University. 

The Forum can be made more interesting to both Alumni and stu- 
dents if they would respond more readily with material so that the editor 
would not have to " fill in" so much material which is uninteresting. 
Or in other words, he could use his discretion in choosing from the ma- 
terial sent in. At the present time he must use all available material. 

Let the Alumnian students respond more readily and we promise a 
newsy and up-to-date Forum. 



144 



THE FORUM 



Base Ball Schedule 

The following base ball schedule has been arranged by Manager J. 
B. Hambright : 



The team is handicapped the same as the basket ball team in not 
having a gymnasium to hold early practice and so will have to wait until 
the weather permits outside work. This is one of the strongest schedules 
Lebanon Valley has ever had in this sport but there is an exceptionally 
large amount of good material in the school this year for the development 
of good 'Varsity and Reserve teams. Every man will be given a thor- 
ough try out by Capt. Pauxtis so as to give every one a chance for the 
team. The list of candidates for the various teams is as follows : 

Catchers — Capt. Pauxtis, Waughtel and Emery. 

Pitchers — Schraeder, Reese, Becker and Snyder. 

ist Base — Hambright and Appenzellar. 

2nd Base — Mc Andrews, Lehman and Carnes. 

3rd Base — Albert. 

Short Stop — Oldham and Knauss. 

Outfielders — Guyer, Maxwell, Wilder, Stehman, Snyder, Hall, 
Brenneman, Pickard, Singer, Erb, Ludwick, Heilman and Light. 



April 7, Gettysburg 

April 14, Indians 

April 19, Susquehanna 

April 20, State College 

April 2i f Bucknell 

April 23, Harrisburg Tri State 

April 25, York 

April 28, Indians 

May 5, ^Delaware 

May 12, Susquehanna 

May 19, Franklin and Marshall 

May 26, Villanova 

May 30, Gettysburg (two games) 

June 2, Felton A. C. 

June 9, Villanova 



at Annville 
at Annville 



at Selins Grove 
at State 
at Lewisburg 
at Harrisburg 
at York 



at Carlisle 
at Annville 
at Annville 
at Lancaster 
at Villanova 



at Gettysburg 



at Annville 
at Annville 



THE FORUM 



"As You Like It" 

With Shakespeare's "Merchant of Venice" which was given last 
Commencement week by the students, a precedent was established for 
followingyears. This year another Shakespearean play "As You Like It" 
will be rendered under the direction of Profs. Jackson and Schlichter. 
The caste is as follows:— Duke, J. W. Kaufmann; Frederick, S. R. Old- 
ham; Amiens, M. F. Lehman; Jaques, J. W. Stehman; Le Beau, E. E. 
Knauss; Charles, J. B Showers; Jaques, S. H. Waughtel; Orlando, A. 
R. Spessard; Adam, R. J. Guyer; Touchstone, M. O. Billow; Corin, 
S. B. Long; Silvius, S. F. Pauxtis; Rosalind, Neda Knaub; Celia, Ano 
D. Adams; Phebe, Effie Schroyer; Audrey, Alice Lutz. 



Hemsseiaer %^ 
* s Polytechnic^ 
S&A Institute, 
%f Troy, N.Y. 

U>ca.l examinations provided for. Send for » Catalogue 

W. J. Baltzell, Class '84, 

Managing Editor of 

THE ETUDE, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Leading Musical Magazine in the United 
States. 



William H. Kreider 

CLASS OF 1894 

Attorney-at-Law 

S. E. Cor. Broad and Chestnut Sts., 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



Standard Steam Caundry and 
Scouring KlorKs, 
27 1). 7 Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

ALLEN F. WARD, Class of 1890, Prop, 

Prompt and Good Service Given. 



Lemberger's compound tar Lozenges 

IN BOXES— 25c, 10c and 5c. 

P S N E L T A E T D LEMBERGER & CO.'S PHARMACY, Lebanon, Pa. 

JOS. L. LEMBERGER, Ph. M. FRANK GLEIM Ph.G. 

„, nnl T ff i n ii ni Covn9V Main and manheim stpeets ' 
HARRY IlkHT Annville, Penn'a. 

II 1 li ll I L 10 II I Always nas on Hand a Full nine of 

OUALili PflPEfl 

Paper and Shade Hanging a Specialty. 



THE FORUM. 



TJhe Charm of Sndi'viduaiity 

77? arks every portrait produced by 

Sates* Studio 



142 Tforth 8th Street, 
^Discount to Students. 



jCebanon, tPenn'a. 

Special Spates to Classes' 



FOR THE LATEST 
AND BEST IN . , . 



HATS 



And MEN'S 
FURNISHINGS 

to Erb & Craumer 

777 Cumb, St„ LEBANON 



$. m. $benR'$ 
Bakery 

Has always on hand 

J re$D Bread, £<tke$ ana Rolls 

ANNVILLE, PA, 

One door west of Pennsylvania House. 



R Complete fllusie Stove 

PIANOS, - - - ORGANS, 
VIOLINS, - GUITARS, - MANDOLINS, 
BANJOS, SHEET MUSTC and BOOKS. 

Musical Goods of all kinds at Lowest Prices. 
Phonographs and Graph ophones from $io to $50. 
15,000 Edison and Columbia Records to select from. 

fllillet* Organ and Piano Co. 

738 Cumberland St., liEBflfiO^, PA. 

FflCTOHV—Highth and maple Sts. 



Jacob Sargent, 

merchant f ailpr 

STYLE, FIT and WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED. 



1*20 U). main $t, Jlnnville. 



IF IN WANT OF 

Books, Stationery, 

FOUNTAIN PENS, FINE WRITING 
PAPER, FANCY GOODS, ALBUMS 
TOILET CASES, CALENDARS, CARDS 
GAMES, PURSES, HOLIDAY GOODS 
or anything kept in an up'tcdate Book 
Store, call or write 

D. P. Witmeyer's Book Store, 

21 S. 8th St., LEBANON, PA. 



I 



THE 



FORUM 



Kodaks, Cameras 
and Supplies 
Pictures 
and Picture Frames 



8th and Willow Sts., LEBANON 
My Specialties Are 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

AND 

CORRECTING VISUAL DEFECTS 




Having thoroughly learned both professions, can 
give the same practical service received in large 
cities. EYES EXAMINED FREE. 



D. B. SHIFFER, 



WEST MAIN STREET. 



ANNVILLE. PA. 



L. W. SHAY 

Candies, Nuts, Krudts 

OYSTERS 
IN EVERY STYLE 



WANTED 



A few agents for 
Annville and the Col- 
lege, the hest seller out, every student 
must have it. Address 

C. S. ROSHON, 
34 N.3rd. St., HARRISBURG, PA. 



H. H. KREIDER. 



JOHN E. HERR 



KREIDER & CO., 

CONTRACTORS 
and BUILDERS. 

Coal, GrainTseed, Salt, 
and Lumber. 

Office and Yards on Railroad St., 
Telephone ANNVILLE. 



M. H. SMITH 



L. G. BOWMAN 

Smith & Bowman, 

Successors to A. C. Zimmerman & Co. 
Dealers In 

Carpets, Rugs, Mattings* 
Draperies. 



Carpets Lifted, Cleaned and Re-Laid 
at the Lowest Prices. 



768 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
Invention Is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
tpecial notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, ?3 a 
year ; four months, |L Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN fiStfJiSs New York 

Branch Office. 625 F St* Washington. D. C. 



9ff. Jfc Shauci, 

Dealer in 

Watches and jewelry 

&ino Candies and bruits. 

A full line of 
jgff Chocolates Downey 



THE FORUM. 



Spalding's 
Athletic 



NO. 250 




Library 

Spalding's 
Official 
Athletic 
Almanac 

FOR 1906 
EDITED BY JAMES E. SULLIVAN 

All Intercollegiate and Interscholastic 
Meets and Records; Amateur Athletic 
Union Records; A. A. U. Senior and 
Junior Championships; Swimming- and 
Skating Records; A. A. U. Boxing and 
Wrestling Championships ; all Shot 
Putting and Weight Throwing Records; 
Official Report of the Lewis and Clark 
Centennial Athletic Games; pictures 
of leading athletes, American and 
foreign. 

PRICE, by mail, 10 CENTS 

4S?*Send your name and address to our neares 
store for Spaulding's Catalogue of all Athleti 
Sports— it's free. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

Chicago St. Louis 



New York 
Philadelphia 
Buffalo 
Boston 
Minneapolis 
Syracuse 



San Francisco Kansas City 
Denver Washington 
Baltimore Pittsburg 
New Orleans Cincinnati 
Montreal, Can London, Eng. 



SENIORS going into 
BUSINESS or 
TECHNICAL WORK 

should write us to-day for full information con- 
cerning desirable positions in all parts of the 
country. We already have 1,231 definite places 
for College, University and Technical School 
graduates to begin work in July or September 
and the list is growing daily. A choice of the 
best opportunities is yours if you write us at 
once, stating age, course taken, practical experi- 
ence, if any, and line of work preferred. 



HAPGOOD'S 



The National Organization of Brain Brokers 
Pennsylvania Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Offices in other cities 



When in Need of 
Dry Goods, Dress Goods, Shoes 
Notions, Hats, Oueensware, 
Carpets, Oil Cloth, Lino*- 
leums and Groceries 
It Will Pay You to See Us. Ladies' and 
Gents' Furnishings and Shoes a Specialty 

SHENK & KINPORTS, 

Main Street, ANNVILLE. 

1860 1885 

J. HENRY MILLER, 
GENERAL INSURANCE AGENT 

S, W, Cor, 8th and Willow Sts., 
LEBANON, PA. 



ALL COMPANIES FIRST-CLASS. 



SHOES . . 



Heatly Repaired 

at Reasonable Pfiees. 



Wm. D. EliliIOTT, 
East CQain St. flnnville. 

Oldest Established Stand in Lebanon. 

J. H. SHUGAR'S 
SONS & CO. 

^GROCERS 

623-25 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON, PA. 



I 



itoinwiitsoi 

LITHOGRAPHERS 

5th and Liberty Sts. PHI LA. 

Diplomas and Certificates of 
Membership. 

Commercial Work our Specialty, 



Druggist. 



Students' Headquarters ! 

Perfumes, Toilet and Fancy 
Articles, Cigars, Etc. 



AMNVILLE, PA. 



WILLIAM P. GAMBER, 

Successor to GAMHER & FAILER 
Who.essle and Reta 1 Ues.ers i, HARDWARE 30(1 HOUSE-FURNISHINGS. 

Heaters, Ranges, Furnaces, Tinsinilhing, Plumbing, Gem Ice Cream 
Freezers, Zero Refrigerators, ( charcoal filled ; Sterling Puritan Oil Stoves 

STEAM AND HOT WATER HEATING A SPECIALTY. 
No. 43 North gttt St„ 



LEBANON, IP A 



Do Vou Know 

That we are headquarters for every thing in Books t 
Writ * to us for prices on the following! Geikie's Bible 
Helps Expositor's Bible. In fact we will furnish you 
anything in the Book line, at reasonable prices. 

II B. Publishing fic«ce, 

Dayton, Ohio. 



2v£. 3E=». SpsLaa-gQ-er 



Nutting 
Building 



LEBANON, PA. 



Life 



Fire Liability INSURANCE Accident 



Health 



Boiler 



Plate Glass 



Frantz's Furniture Bazaar 

We are prepared, through 
long years of study, to 
offer a Superb Line of Fur- 
niture in all grades from 
which to make selections 
at low prices 

D. A. FRANTZ, Undertaker 

732-734 CiimDEii»n« street, Lebanon 



After . l 

Graduation- 



If you want to start right in business 
or teohnioal work, wo oan answer the 
' question. Men wanted for desirable posi- 
tions to be open with high grade employer* 
after July 1. A limited number of good op- 
portunities for summer work. 
Writo us to-day stating position desired. 

HAPQOODS (Inc.) 
300 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 

Hartford Bldg., Chioago. 
Williamson Bldg., Cleveland. 
Park Bldg., Pittsburg. 
Pennsylvania Bldg., Philadelphia, 
Chemical Bldg., St. Louis. 
Loan & Trust Bldg., Minneapolis. 
Other offices in other cities. 



Xebanon 



This College, founded in 1866 and chartered with full university privileges 
by our State Legislature in 1867, stands for character, high scholarship and noble 
manhood and womanhood. Here choice young people from various states come 
into competition and fellowship with one another, and with teachers of high 
character, sound learning and progressive methods and ideas. 

Tjhe College department 

Offers five Groups of Studies leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. The 
groups bear the names of the leading subjects included in them. They are : the 
Classical Group, the Philosophical Group, the Chemical-Biological Group, the 
Historical- Political Group, and the Modern Language Group. 

Vhe tfcademj, 'Department 

Covers the work of the standard High and Normal Schools and Academies 
and prepares for College, Teaching and Business. 

Uhe Conservator!/ of 97Jusic 

Offers complete courses in Pianoforte, Voice, Organ, Harmony, etc., after methods 
of the foremost European Conservatories. The various branches of art are also taught. 

Advantages : 

Thoroughness, Cheapness, Completeness, Commodious Buildings and a Fine 
Campus for Athletic purposes. 

The personal attention given each student secures to him a splendid educa- 
tion under the most stimulating influences. 



Winter TJerm begins J?an. 4, '06/ Spring JJerm Jtprii 3 



&or further Snformation jfddress 

John €. jCehman, j{. 77f. s 7)ean 

Jinnville, SPa. 



2/alley College, 



/ 



THE FORUM 



Catering . . . 




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OUR SPECIALTY 1015 N. Third Street. 225 Market Street. 

Fancy Ices, Cakes, Confections Harrisburg, Pa. 

Shipped Anywhere. Correspondence Solicited. 



jiiuiviiiv eivvtriv Liyi/i 

Company 

Electric Light Electric Wiring 

Electrical Supplies 
ol every description 

ANNVILLE, « * PA. 


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LADIES' and GENTS' 

Furnishings 

Discount to Students 

West Main St., Annville, Pa. 


Dr. Harry Zimmerman 
Dentist 

Reductions to Students 
72 West Main St., Annville, Pa. 


JOSEPH G. KELCHNER 

T-> 4 

Butcher 

Daily Meat Market of home dressed meats 

Also a full line of Smoked Meats. 
Annville, * ' Pa. 


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ANNVILLE, PA. 


W. C WOOLF 

Groceries and Provisions 

65 East Main St, ANNVILLE, PA. 


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Contents. 



Then and Now ..... 145 

Translation From Heine's Harzreise . 147 
"Undine" as a Product of the German Roman- 
tic School. ..... 148 

The College Man in Business . . 152 

A Book's Opinions of Its Readers . . 153 
Editorial ..... 155 

The Musical Clubs 1 Trip . . . 156 

Sophomore Banquet . . . .157 

A Much Needed Gift .... 158 

Opening of Spring Term . . . 159 

Alumni Notes . . . . .160 

Y. M. C. A. Notes .... 161 

The Normal Department . . . ,161 
Academy Base Ball Team . . . 162 
Literary Societies . . . . .162 

Iowa Senate Reveres Dead Bishop . . 163 
College Notes . . . . .164 

College Calendar for May . . . 166 
Special Session of Trustees . . .166 

Colleges and College Men . . . 167 

Base Ball ...... 168 



THE FORUM. 

Volume XIX. APRIL, 1906 Number 7 



Then and Now 

HIRTY years ago, when the parents of the present students were 
in college, Lebanon Valley was a very unpretentious affair in 
comparison with its number of splendid buildings now occupied, 
or awaitiug completion. Then, the present Academy building 
was the Ladies' Hall, not expensively furnished, but filled with as sweet 
and bright girls, as even now grace the College halls. Under the strict 
discipline of that day, he was a fortunate youth who could secure permis- 
sion to call for an hour on Saturday afternoon, and that favor was usually 
granted on the written request of the young ladies' parents. Of course 
the sexes were never seen in promiscuous association, and the idea of 
taking strolls together on Sunday afternoon was never seriously con- 
sidered, though doubtless, the desire to do so by those inclined to the 
sentimental was present then as now. 

The only other college building was what was called the Main build 
ing, afterwards the Administration building, and that only half as large as 
it was at the time of the fire. In this building were the recitation rooms, 
the dining room, the chapel, the President's ofiice and the boys dormi- 
tories. A little crowded, but there were some excellent teachers, and 
students with noble heads and hearts, who have since filled spheres of 
usefulness and achieved enviable success. 

We had few athletic sports, but such games as we had were played 
by the student body, heartily and enthusiasticly. It never occured to 
us then that hired, or professional players were necessary to make gen- 
uine sport, or to give the college standing in the educational world. 

The period of a generation witnesses wonderful changes in advance- 
ment and progress. Sometimes the movement seems to be retrograde, 
particularly to the old who have fond recollection of youth. But on the 
whole the general trend is in the right direction, and new doors of 
opportunity, new fields of endeavor, new methods of culture and equip- 
ment, are placing the present generation far ahead of the past. 



146 



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The recent immense undertakings have surprised all who have not 
kept abreast of the situation. Instead of two building swith little thought 
of appearance, here are a series of structures, modern in architecture, 
ornate in design, and planned for great things — involving an expenditure 
of some $200,000. The Administration building, when completed, will 
compare with the best, and will accommodate five hundred to a thousand 
students. The two dormitories are fine buildings, and under well regu- 
lated conditions should have a waiting list of students ready to occupy 
them, when a vacancy occurs. Here, too, the possibilities for social cul- 
ture are all that could be desired. For heating and lighting, the most 
improved methods are used, having reference to cleanliness and comfort. 

With ability to utilize all these possibilities, young men and women 
may think themselves fortunate in being able to prepare for life work in 
L,ebanon Valley College. 

Education is fundamental, and it is high time that our people realize 
this truth. Parents often, indeed generally, treat it as secondary, and 
the children imbibe this spirit. What else can be expected ? Here is the 
field of opportunity for the wide-awake pastor and teacher. " A word 
fitly spoken is like apples of gold in pictures of silver. ' ' Gems of price- 
less value have been picked up casually by the way, and aspirations have 
been inspired, the spirit of endeavor has been stirred by the thoughtful 
suggestions of a friend, a pastor, or a teacher, and thereby a new star has 
been added to the galaxy of the immortals, a name which the world will 
not willingly let die. Here, then, is the privilege and duty of every 
friend of our College to fill its walls with awakened minds, who will use 
the opportunities here offered for that culture and preparation for life 
work, absolutely essential in this age for the highest and best achieve- 
ment. Pres. A. P. Funkhouser. 

Translation from Heine's Harzreise 

Y Logis promised a splendid view from the Rammelsberg. It 
was a beautiful evening. Night hunted upon her black 
steeds, and the long manes fluttered in the wind. I stood at 
the window and contemplated the moon. Is there really a 
man in the moon ? The Slavs say he is called Klotar, and that the wax- 
ing of the moon is caused through his watering it. When I was still 
small I had heard that the moon was a fruit which was plucked by God 



m 



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147 



when it became ripe, and laid with the rest of the full-moons in the great 
closet which stands at the end of the world, and there it is nailed up with 
boards. 

When I became larger I noticed that the world was not so 
narrowly bounded, that the human spirit breaks through these wooden 
barriers, and with an enormous (Peter's) key, with the idea of immortal- 
ity has opened all seven heavens. Immortality ! Beautiful thought ! 
Who has first conceived you ? Was it a burger of Nurmberg, who sat in 
a summer twilight before his house-door, with a white night-cap upon 
his head and a white clay pipe in his mouth, and dreamily thought how 
beautiful it would be if he thus forever, without his pipe |and his life s 
breath going out, could sit and vegetate into Eternity. Or was it a young 
lover who in the arms of his loved one, had those thoughts, and thought 
of them because he felt them, and because he could feel and think nothing 
else ' Love ! Immortality !— Suddenly in my breast it became so hot, 
that I believed the geographies had misplaced the equator, and that it now 
ran straight through my heart. And out of my heart gushed the feeling 
of love gushed forth longingly into the wide night. A heavy perfume 
came from the flowers in the garden beneath my feet. Perfumes are the 
feelings of flowers, and as the heart of man in the night where it believes 
itself alone and unwatched, feels strongly, so seem even the flowers, pen- 
sively ashamed, to await the encircling darkness in order to give them- 
selves up entirely to their feelings, and to expire in sweet perfumes. 
Pour out, thou fragrance of my heart ! and seek behind those mountains 
the loved one of my dreams ! Even now she lies and sleeps ; at her feet 
the angels kneel, and if she smiles in her sleep, so is it a|prayer which the 
angels echo; in her breast heaven lies with all its bliss, and when she 
breathes my heart trembles in the distance ; behind the silken lashes of 
her eyes the sun has gone down. When she opens her eyes it is day and 
the birds sing, the herd bells sound and the mountains shimmer in their 
emerald clothes, and I strap on my knapsack and wander. 

S. R. Oldham, 'o8. 



148 



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"Undine" as a Product of the German Romantic School. 

N the last years of Schiller's life, there was a reaction against the 
philosophy, which he and Goethe had been trying to teach. 
Also, against the artificial classicism of the French school of 
poetry, which up to this time had permeated German literature, 
were the efforts of this reactive movement directed. This movement 
became known as the Romantic school, and its writers, with their 
appeals to the imagination, faith and superstition, were welcomed by 
the people, who were tired of the cold intellectuality of Schiller. 

The Romantic school wanted to restore a belief in that mystery and 
wonder which surround the existence of man. The grotesque, the fan- 
tastic, the wonderful, they tried to portray in their poetry. To do this 
they naturally turned to a period when these things were the chief 
characteristics of poetry, and when poetry was carried into every phase 
of life. This was during the Middle Ages. To restore the picturesque 
life of this time was their constant aim, they longed to bring about the 
same condition of affairs that existed when poetry was the people's 
luxury and their pastime. So to the Middle Ages they went, delving in 
old manuscripts, and from them getting their fantastic and extravagant 
adventures, bringing to light old forgotten legends, and Jjthey even went 
so far as to adopt mediaeval expressions. One reason why they pre- 
ferred mediaeval poetry as opposed to the classics, was, as one of the 
school expressed it, "The antique was foreign and at best we could have 
only poor imitation, while mediaeval poetry is national — deals with 
things that can inspire as — our religion, history, and our own Father- 
land." 

In all their works the personality of the writer stands out promi- 
nently. Some of their chief characteristics are their trying to unite 
practical life with art and poetry, trying to restore the Catholic faith of 
the Middle Ages, the fanciful way in which they viewed nature, and 
then the mediaeval setting which they gave everything. 

The school was divided into the earlier and later periods. The 
Schlegel brothers, Novalis, and Tiek are the greatest names associated 
with the older school — to the later movement belong Achim von Amine, 
Brentano, Chamisso, Fouque, Grimm and Uhland. Of Fouque's work, 
•'Undine" is perhaps his best and most popular. It has been translated 
into almost every European language. 




THE FORUM 



149 



This fantastic story with its enchanted forests, in which wander 
strange beings, and in which you encounter talking brooks and water- 
falls, is indeed most charming, and is a good example of the work of 
these men. The story is taken from an old mediaeval legend dating, 
perhaps, as far back as the thirteenth century. 

Undine was a beautiful mermaid — her father, wishing that she 
might be endowed with a soul, and knowing the only way for her to 
possess it, is for her to live with human beings, has her taken, when a 
very small child, to a fisherman's hut — the simple fishing people find 
her, and thinking she had been lost or left there to die, they take her 
in and adopt her. They are unable to understand her wild, capricious 
moods — even after grown to beautiful young womanhood she never left 
teasing, playful manner — she acted as a spoiled child. 

To the fisherman's hut came one day, a knight, a true mediaeval 
knight, and mounted on his prancing snow-white steed, with his scarlet 
red cloak thrown over his violet, gold embroidered jacket — it is indeed 
no wonder that Undine should lose her heart to him, for he was the 
first young man she had ever seen, and he loved her from the first 
meeting, for neither had ever seen such beauty. Her playfulness, her 
mysteriousness attracted him, and he stayed days and days until they 
were finally married. 

But before they were married, Undine told Huldebrand, for that 
was the knight's name, that she was not of his race — she had no soul. 
She told him of her family — her father, a king among the water sprites, 
lived in the far off Mediterranean sea. Her uncle Kuhleborn was the 
monarch of the waters throughout the country in which they were living, 
and he it was who had brought her to the fisherman. For an instant a 
revulsion came over Huldebrand, to think he had loved this strange, this 
soulless maid. But his love quickly overcame every other feeling and 
he married her. After the marriage, Undine was a changed creature, 
she was all gentleness, mildness, goodness, a perfect woman — she had 
a soul. 

The young people left the fisherman and his wife, and before going 
to Huldebrand' s castle on the Danube, they decided to spend some time 
in town— Huldebrand wanted to show his beautiful bride. Undine 
became very popular in town, her beauty, her gentle winning ways made 
her a general favorite. Between one of the young women, named 
Berthalda, and Undine an unusually warm friendship developed, so 



150 



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much so that Undine insisted on Berthalda' s going with them to their 
castle. 

The tragedy that followed is not hard to imagine. Huldebrand 
learned to love Berthalda, and to Undine he became more and more un- 
kind — continually slighted and hurt at every turn, Undine led a solitary 
life, but never a reproach, never an unkind word did she utter. She 
loved Huldebrand with as intense a love as when she first saw him. At 
times his former passion would return and his old time love of Undine 
would make him forget that she was not of his race. 

Undine warned him again and again that he should never be unkind 
to her near the water, because her relations, should they see her weep, 
would be sure to think her unhappy and would carry her off to her for- 
mer home, and since she now had feelings and longings such as human 
beings, she would be very unhappy in the watery kingdoms. One day 
while the three were sailing down the Danube, Huldebrand did become 
angry with Undine, he scolded her, and, bursting into tears as she real- 
ized that she was being drawn into the depths, she said quite faintly — 
" Ach, holder Freind, ach, lebe wohl ! Sie sollen dir nichts thun : mir 
bleibe treu, dass ich sie dir abwehren kann. Ach, aber fort muss ich, 
muss fort auf diese ganze junge I^ebenszeit. O weh, O weh, was hast du 
angerichtet ! O weh, O weh !" With that she vanished over the side of 
the boat. 

Huldebrand truly mourned for her, and ever conscious of her last 
warning, he did remain true to her for month 5, but finally he decided to 
marry Berthalda. Undine in her home under the seas was conscious of 
all his acts, and she appeared to him in his dreams, night after night, 
urging him to be true to her, because if he was not, the water sprites 
had decided that he must die. He finally married Berthalda, and a few 
hours after the wedding a shrouded figure rose out of the well, and ad- 
vanced with measured tread to Huldebrand' s room — it was Undine, sent 
to pronounce the death sentence on one whom she still loved better than 
her own life. When Huldebrand saw her he knew why she had come — 
he began to feel death creeping over him, his old love for her came back 
and he wished that he might die in her arms, giving her one last kiss — 
and so he died. Leaving the room, still sobbing, she said to a servant 
" Ich habe ihn totegeweint," and then vanished. 

This in short is the story. It is truly mediaeval, and with its 
appeal to the imagination, and its weirdness it is a good example of the 



THE FORUM 



151 



Romantic style. But I have said very little of one part of the story, 
perhaps the most charming part, the part which is truly characteristic 
of this school — and that is the way in which they treat nature. 

The ground, the trees, the water, everything is full of all sorts of 
spirits, and nymphs. Going through the woods you could expect to 
have all sorts of tricks played upon you, all kinds of odd creatures 
bobbing in the middle of your pathway. Where you see a man stand- 
ing a brook will suddenly appear. Where a moment before there was 
nothing except bare rock, a waterfall will send its dashing spray over 
you, laughing and mocking you in your confusion. 

Kuhleborn, the uncle of Undine, had brought her, when a child, to 
the fisherman, and for that reason he always felt as though he were her 
guardian — and terrible was his anger when he thought her mistreated. 
He turned up anywhere, at most unexpected times, in the most fantastic, 
or grotesque shapes. He fairly haunted Huldebrand and Berthalda after 
they began to slight Undine. 

Fouque has certainly succeeded in giving a beautiful close to this 
story which at first seemed to have ended so tragically. 

The day when Huldebrand was buried, as the mourners were follow- 
ing the bier, a closely veiled figure glided among them " Undine." 
They whispered to one another, and shrank from her, but they let her 
follow unmolested. At the grave they all knelt with bowed heads until 
the grave was closed. When they arose the stranger was not there, but 
where she had knelt a little stream came bubbling from the turf — it 
rippled and rippled onward until the grave of the knight was altogether 
enclosed. So you may still see the ever faithful Undine embracing her 
lover knight. Eijzabeth Stehman, '07. 



152 



THE FORUM 



The College Man in Business 

NTIL, recently people believed that a college man was good for 
nothing but the medical, or the legal profession. This view 
arose from the fact that only young men with ordinary educa- 
tion entered business ; and as they generally became richer than 
most professional men, a college training came to be considered an actual 
hinderance instead of a help. 

Those people, however, who still hold this view forget that conditions 
have changed, and that the new conditions demand a new and different 
type of men. They forget that the present day business is conducted on 
a large scale, and that the business men of the past would be amazed to 
see the changes that have taken place. Half a century ago almost any 
one had sufficient capital to conduct business on the ordinary small scale. 
The present cut-throat competition, which requires special training and 
ability, was then unknown. 

Many persons think that a college training is useless, because the 
curriculum contains little that pertains to business. But this is a mis- 
take. The present elective system enables the student to study the mod- 
ern languages and practical economics. The other subjects may not aid 
him practically, but the very fact that he has mastered them, will give 
him the power to master other subjects that may be connected with his 
business, and to acquire them more thoroughly than the person who did 
not have a college training. He will not only be better fitted to master 
his special business training, but his college education should also have 
increased his ability as a thinker, so that he can study a situation more 
thoroughly and decide it with greater accuracy than his less favored 
rivals. Besides this a college training gives one a broad view of human 
nature, and develops higher ideals of honesty and living than are likely 
to be acquired elsewhere. 

Every man's object in entering business is to make money. Whether 
or not he succeeds in accomplishing his purpose depends largely on his 
personal ability and his preparation for his work. If a man possessing 
ability and a limited amount of preparation is able to make a partial 
financial success, there is no question but that a college training would 
increase his chances. Not only will it increase his returns, but it will 
also make him more honest than he could be without it. Although the 
college man is usually guided by " college ethics " while at school, he is 




THE FORUM 



153 



at heart honest, and at graduation leaves behind him these seemingly 
loose moral principles. 

A college training gives to its possessor superior ability which he may 
use justly or unjustly. The fact that a man possesses special ability, im- 
poses upon him a special duty. He may use his superior ability to hide 
the injustice that he is doing to his fellow men, instead of using it in a 
legitimate business. But right and justice demand that he use it for his 
own benefit in such a way that his actions will be within the bounds of 
honesty. Unless the college man in business be honest and use his super- 
ior ability in an unselfish way, he would better not have his college 
training at all. 

As a practical illustration of an educated man in business, we have 
Marshall Field who died recently in Chicago. Honesty and great wealth 
are usually considered too inconsistent to be found in the same person, 
but this principle did not apply to him. In all his dealings he was abso- 
lutely honest, and was the richest man in Chicago. He was one of the 
best educated merchants of his day, and to this higher education much 
of his success can be attributed. Just as he, the most successful business 
man of the past, was better educated than his contemporaries, so the 
business men of the future to be eminently successful must also have a 
liberal education, and the place to get it is at college. The great and 
successful business men of the twentieth century will be college or uni- 
versity graduates, who have combined with their higher training the 
purer qualities and principles of Marshall Field. 

M. R. Mktzgbr, '07. 

A Book's Opinions of Its Readers. 

WAS once the counselor of a good old man. I was his daily 
tutor; the one whom he loved most and upon whom he con- 
stantly meditated. The time came when I could no longer lie 
upon his lap and see the waving curls, which once hung about 



his ears, for it had been many years since we had been laid to rest — he 
to sleep, but I to wake at any time to soothe the weary mother, to guide 
the earnest pilgrim on his way, or to illuminate the heart, whose icy doors 
had long been closed to all good. There I was— the starlit pathway 
from this lowly earth to the vaulted sky. 

The dust upon my leathern back told how long I had been lying on 



I 



154 THE FORUM 

the shelf ; so long that I began to think the good old men had all died, 
and that science and art were gathering the sheaves, that were wrought 
for me. One quiet evening I changed my decision. I heard the patter 
of little feet. I awoke and saw it was a little girl. I asked her whether 
I might be her chaperon through life. 

1 ' What makes you ask me that ?' ' she said. " I do not know you. ' ' 
" No, you do not know me, but you are tired and thirsty. Here, I 
will give you a cup from which, if you drink, you shall never thirst. 
My ways are paths of pleasantness and peace. Ask wisdom, and I will 
give it thee." She accepted me as a friend, and my walk with her was 
sweet. 

I was again forgotten for some time, until one day a professor 
advised one of his students to take a course with me. The boy was cold 
and indifferent, and to teach him the real joys of life was a difficult task. 
For one hour each week, I lay on the table before him like crimson 
before the blind, but he saw not ; my words to him were words of idle- 
ness, joys which he could not receive and beauty not to be perceived. 
My journey with him was not pleasant. I followed him through his 
school-days, but afterwards he paced more rapidly, and I could not keep 
step with him. I last saw him as he passed through the broad gates 
of pleasures. I gave a sigh for I knew he was some kind mother's boy, 
but I could not call him back. 

Four years rolled by and another young student was put under my 
care. His eyes were bright, his face a story-book, and his heart a world 
of love. I spoke to him in these words: "Wherewith shall a young 
man cleanse his way? search and you shall find." He accepted my 
doctrine. I became the joy of his life. In the morning I filled his 
heart with sunshine for the day, and when the evening stars were 
twinkling, he sank to rest amid my downy feathers. His college days 
were seasons of gladness, his manhood days were spent in heralding the 
words, '* Drink and live," into every clime. The end of his life was not 
death, but the transformation of mortality to immortality. 

Thus time passed on. I was getting old and torn, but many happy 
thoughts came to me as I entered the hearts of those who turned my 
stained and rugged pages. I looked into many thousand hearts and 
faces, some beaming with sunshine, others dying for food. At last I lay 
down, and He, who is called " Revised," took my place. 

J. F. Lsininger '10. 



THE FORUM. 155 

THE FORUM. 

Vol. XIX. APRJL, 1906. No. 7 

Editor-in-Chief, 

A. W. HERRMAN, '07. 

Associate Editors, 

EDWARD E. KNAUSS, '07 ETHEL MYERS, '07 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS : 
M. R. METZGER, '07 ERMA SHUPE, '08 

S. R. OLDHAM, '08 M. O. BILLOW, '08 

Business Managers > 

C. RAY BENDER, '07, Chief. 
ASSISTANTS 

R. J. GUYER, '08 G- M. RICHTER, '09 

The Forum Is published each month during the college year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College. 

TERMS :— Subscription Price, 50 cents a Year. Single Copy, 10 cents. 

All business matter should be addressed to The Forum, Annville, Pa. ; all literary matter to 
A. W. Herrman, Annville, Pa. 

Subscribers failing to receive The Forum regularly will please notify us promptly. 

Ruhseribers who have changed their residence would confer a great favor by notifying n» j of tne 
change ^gi^^t^o^ndnew address. We can not be held responsible for any irregularity if 
this is neglected. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as second-class mail matter. 

Editorial. 

This Number of The Forum is published by the new staff, we 
believe that the outgoiug editors did their best to maintain the standard 
of The Forum, and it is the determination of the present staff to do its 
best for the success of the same. If then its readers shall notice an im- 
provement, and we hope that they shall, let them ascribe it to the fact 
that we have learned by experience. Very modestly do we assume our 
responsibility. We shall not begin by making great promises. We are 
willing to be judged by our work. Suggestions for the betterment of 
The Forum are not merely welcomed, but they are solicited. 

* * * 

In the building up of this college for a "Greater Lebanon Valley," 
one of our most important needs seems to be forgotten by every one ex- 
cept the students. This need is a gymnasium. The older students of 



156 



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the college had hopes in their Freshman year of being fortunate enough 
to use the gymnasium before graduation, but by the donor's withdrawal, 
their visions seem to have fled, and it would seem as if we would never 
have a gymnasium. 

It seems strange that a college of our size, and one that has made so 
much progress in all departments, is not looked after in this particular. 
If we visit any college, or preparatory school of any note in this part of 
the country, the first thing students will boast of is their gymnasium. 
Then, if we should care to increase our student body this matter must be 
attended to. This may seem to be only a statement to some, but it is a 
real fact. Some students will not come to Lebanon Valley because we 
have no place to take systematic exercise. The writer knows personally 
students, who would have come to our college, but when they learned 
that we had no gymnasium, they entered other colleges where they had 
such facilities. 

If the faculty and officers of the college desire the best work possible 
from the student in the class room, why do they not urge on this matter? 
A student without proper exercise can not exercise his mind to the best 
advantage. It seems foolish to think that a student should come here 
and develop his mind and soul, and leave the welfare of his body to take 
care of itself. Now that the offer for a gymnasium has been withdrawn, 
may we be able to look forward to some day in the near future when some 
friend will build a gymnasium? Until this building is realized the college 
will always be behind in athletics. How can we be expected to compete 
with other colleges that have well equipped gymnasiums to develop their 
athletes? 

If this building is not soon forthcoming, the students should 
take action and bring the matter before the trustees and officers of the 
College. We hope that the day is not far distant when we will have the 
necessary facilites for the development of our students, and especially those 
who try for the different athletic teams. 

The Musical Clubs' Trip 

The members of the Glee, mandolin and Guitar clubs spent the 
greater part of their spring vacation on a trip through Cumberland Val- 
ley. Fi/e concerts were given in as many towns. The Glee club of 
last year sang at four of these places, and the impression left by it was 



Rkv. A. P. PUNKBOUSER 

RECENTLY ELECTED PRESIDENT OF LEI? ANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



THE FORUM 



157 



the means of bringing out crowded houses to hear this year's combination 
clubs. In all nearly three thousand people heard the program rendered. 
The audiences were composed of the most cultured citizens of the com- 
munities in which the concerts were given. Nearly every number was 
encored, and some numbers more than once. Such newspaper comments 
as these, "The Glee, Mandolin and Guitar clubs, of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, again scored a success in Chambersburg, by rendering a 
program in First United Brethren church, last evening, that pleased the 
audience that had assembled to hear the young musicians," and, "The 
work of both the vocal and instrumental portions of the club was good," 
indicate the general appreciation of the entertaining ability of these clubs. 
Several members were given individual mention in newspapers. 

The itmerary was as follows: March 24, at Mechanicsburg; March 
26, at Chambersburg; March 27, at Shippensburg; March 28, at Waynes- 
boro; March 29, at Smithburg, Md. At Mechanicsburg the concert was 
held in the town hall, at Chambersburg, in the First United Brethren 
church; at Shippensburg, in Educational Hall; at Waynesboro, in the 
opera house; and at Smithburg, in the town hall. Members of the Glee 
club furnished the music for the preaching services at the Chambersburg 
First United Brethren church, the strongest church of its denomination 
in every way in the East, on Sunday, March 25. 

At each of the five places, the musicians were taken into private 
homes, and were entertained hospitiably. No less than an hundred and 
fifty homes opened their doors to them gladly. After the concerts, re- 
ceptions were given in honor of the college boys at Chambersburg, Ship- 
pensburg and Smithburg. At Mechanicsburg, Misses Ora Harnish, '06, 
Mae Hoerner, '09, Anna and Bessie Nisley entertained some of the boys 
at their respective homes. The trip was a pleasant one, and it was enjoy- 
ed by all. Manager M. O. Snyder feels confident that our musical clubs 
made a good record. He compliments the boys for having behaved like 
gentlemen. 

Sophomore Banquet 

The class of 1908 held its banquet at the Lochiel Hotel, Harrisburg, 
on Friday evening, April 6. There was some fear that a member, or 
more than one, might be detained by the rival class, '09, but when the 



158 



THE FORUM 



last person boarded the car at Palmyra everyone was happy. The fol- 
lowing menu was served in the Lochiel dining room at 9.30 o'clock. 
Blue Points on Half Shell 
Olives Gherkins 
Consomme, Princess 
Planked Shad, Gloucester Style 
Saratoga Chips 
Sweetbread Croquettes aux Petite Poies 
Roman Punch 
Broiled Spring Chicken on Toast 
New Potatoes Asparagus 
Tomato and Lettuce Salad 
Fruit 

Strawberries and Ice Cream 
Coffee 

When all had done full justice to the many good things, the toast- 
master, M. O. Billow, addressed the class and announced the following 
toasts, which were responded to in a very pleasing and happy manner. 
"Our Girls" R. S. B. Hartz 

"Our Boys" Miss Alice Zuck 

"Our Athletics" Stanley Oldham 

"President's Toast" R. J. Guyer 

Before leaving the dining hall the class and college yells were given, 
after which the class went to the parlor where a short time was spent in 
music with Mr. Ludwig at the piano. It is not necessary to add that 
everyone thoroughly enjoyed the evening's programme. The happy 
faces of all was a testimony stronger than words. 

A Much Needed Gift. 

By diverting the twenty-five thousand dollars that was originally 
intended for a science hall to the general building fund, the immediate 
completion of the Administration building has been made possible. The 
donor of this money agreed to this arrangement without the least demur. 

This does not mean that the science hall will not be built. It will 
be delayed, and that is all. The foundation has been built, and is now 
ready for the superstructure. 



THE FORUM. 



159 



Owing to a reversal of the financial policy, it may not be built for 
a year or so. As President Funkhouser indicates in another article in 
this number, a canvass was started for $200,000. With the expectation 
of securing this amount, plans were made for four new buildings, two of 
which — the boys' and the girls' new dormitories, both fine buildings, 
— have been completed and the third, the Administration building, nearly 
so. This building when completed is to cost between fifty-five and sixty 
thousand dollars. It is so nearly completed that only the inside work 
remains to be done. The $200,000 have not been forthcoming as rapidly 
as had been anticipated. 

Not wishing to plunge into debt, the authorities stopped work on 
the building until more money would be available. A proposition was 
made to the gentleman who offered $25,000 for a science hall, and it 
was accepted. 

The students are anxious to have the Administration building fin- 
ished, for it is to contain the recitation rooms. Since the fire of last 
Christmas a year ago, the recitations have been held in the Conservatory 
of Music. This building is not suited for literary and music work 
simultaneously. 

Opening of Spring Term. 

After a vacation of ten days, the College began the Spring term on 
Tuesday, April 3, at 9 o'clock. The students were very irregular in 
returning. Some of them came back on the Saturday before classes 
were started, but the last arrivals came in after work had been begun. 
All the students report having had a pleasant vacation. 

The first glad news that greeted the student body was the announce- 
ment by the Dean, Prof. Lehman, that the afternoon periods had been 
cut down for this term from one hour to forty-five minutes. This 
arrangement is advantageous to students and professors alike in many 
ways. Under this plan the last period ends at 3.15 o'clock. The base 
ball men are favored especially. Their afternoon classes will not inter- 
fere with their daily practise. 

This is a very busy term. The seniors are finishing their theses. 
In addition to their graduation thesis, they are required to write three 
others during the year. In some cases procrastination is now making 
trouble in the senior camp. The Bizarre is keeping the juniors busy. 



I 



160 THE FORUM 

Class scraps are still engrossing the minds of the sophomores and the fresh- 
men. Base ball, the preparation for several plays, society anniversaries 
and countless other affairs are heaping up work for the students. 

However, it must be remembered that these things are merely 
secondary. Class work must not be slighted for a day of reckoning 
will come before we get our grades. 

Alumni Notes 

Miss Mabel Spayd, '04, was recently a visitor at the college. 

Thomas F. Miller, '01, was with us a few days at the beginning of 
the term. 

We are pleased to hear of Rev. A. R. Clippinger's, '05, success on 
his charge, New Cumberland. 

Prof. J. E. Lehman, '74, delivered his lecture on " The Man in the 
Moon " before a large audience at New Cumberland, Apr. 6. 

Titus Kreider, '05, who so successfully managed our base ball team 
last season, now a student at Yale, witnessed our first base ball game of 
the season, Apr. 7. 

Prof. Harry E. Spessard, '00, and Miss Alice M. Beck were united 
in happy wedlock in the Reformed Church, of Cavetown, Md., on March 
28. They have taken up their residence on East Main Street, Annville. 
We wish them a long and happy life. 

Dr. H. U. Roop, '93, ex-president of Lebanon Valley College, re- 
turned to Annville on Thursday, April 5, from an European trip of five 
weeks, during which time he made a study of the educational systems of 
the leading continental universities. He is in good health and reports 
having had an enjoyable time. 

" The Forum " tenders congratulations to Prof. H. E. Enders, '97, 
for his success in repeatedly winning scholarships and prizes at Johns 
Hopkins University. Recently he was selected University Scholar in 
Zoology for 1905-06. He had the same scholarship during 1904-05. Be- 
sides this he has won a number of prizes and was also elected a member 
of the honorary fraternity, Chapter Alpha of Maryland Phi Beta Kappa. 



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161 



Y. M. C. A. Notes 

New Y. M. C. A. officers have been elected for 1906-7. They are : 
President, E. M. Gehr ; vice president, S. B. Long ; secretary, C. L. 
Emery ; treasurer, J. Fred Miller ; pianist, E. V. Hodges ; janitor, J. F. 
Leininger ; and chorister, M. F. Lehman. 

President Gehr has appointed these committees. On membership, 
S. H. Waughtel, W. E. Hamilton, C. F. Clippinger and A. W. Herr- 
man ; on finance, J. F. Miller, J. L. Appenzellar and J. W. Stehman ;on 
bible study, C. W. Shoop, C. L. Emery and J. F. Leininger ; on mission- 
ary, J. B. Showers, G. M. Richter and H. W. Andrews ; on devotional, 
M. O. Billow, S. B. Long and Mark Wert ; on social, P. F. Esbenshade, 
W. E. Herr and R. J. Guyer. 

During the first week of April, W. J. Miller, state Y. M. C. A. secre- 
tary, spent a few days here in the interest of the state association. He 
held short conferences with each committee, the object of which was to 
give them a start in their work. 

The Normal Department. 

That an increased outlay produces increased returns, is surely 
applicable to the Normal, or teachers' department of the College. Every 
spring term brings in a large delegation of " Normalites," but the 
enrollment for this year is going to be a record breaker. They have 
started to come. Every day a few more make their appearance. Judg- 
ing from present indications, more than a hundred will be in this depart- 
ment. The new buildings on the campus make it possible to accommo- 
date adequately so large a number. 

It is almost within the realm of tradition that Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, once known as the Annville Academy, has been the mecca of 
seekers of knowledge and improvement in this section of the State. To 
sustain the popularity of the Academy of years ago in this vicinity, the 
Normal department has been kept up with a corps of able professors and 
teachers at its head. 

Prof. Wesley M. Heilman, A. B., is the principal. He is assisted by 
Alvin Binner, M. E., and to some extent by the Academy professors. 
There is no scarcity of talent to manage properly this department. 



162 



THE FORUM 



There are many advantages in a college normal that are not to be 
found in a strictly normal school. College life is the molding of complete 
and useful lives. The sociability and the intellectuality of the college 
will saturate even the students of the Academy and ofjthe Normal de- 
partments, even though the former is in a way isolated from the two 
latter. 

X X 

Academy Base Ball Team 

In order to create some enthusiasm along the line of athletics in the 
Academy, a base ball team has been formed in that department. It is 
hoped that the boys will do their part in practising so as to make them- 
selves able to compete with other academy and high school teams. The 
candidates for the team are: S. Roy Brenneman, Albert Brenneman, 
Robert Kreider, J. K. Lehman, Lester and Earl Spessard, Mark Wert, 
Amos Bomberger, Rex and Dwight John, W. C. Shoop, Floyd Shafer, 
Mahlon Wells and John Leininger. From this list the following officers 
have been chosen : Captain, S. Roy Brenneman ; assistant, Robert Krei- 
der ; manager, Lester Spessard ; treasurer, J. F. Leininger. 

With a little practise and training there is no doubt but that a good 
team can be selected from this list, and it is hoped that the Academy fac- 
ulty, all those in authority, and friends of the Academy will encourage 
the team, both financially, and with good will so as to make the under- 
taking a success. All other Academies and high schools have their ath- 
letics, such as foot ball, basket ball and base ball. If managed rightly 
there is no reason whylour Academy should not be classified with the up-to- 
date institutions. 

X X 

Literary Societies 

The Kalozetean literary society celebrated its twenty-ninth annivers- 
ary, April 13. The hall was tastefully decorated with the society colors, 
red and old gold. The following program was rendered : 

Invocation, President A. P. Funkhouser ; organ prelude — Fantasia, 
Andante, Allegro, W. Faulkes, L. DeWitt Herr ; President's address, 
' ' An Example of Persistence," Paul M. Spangler; quartette, While I Have 
You, arranged by J. A. Parker, E. Hamilton, F. Hartman, R. G. Light, 
E. V. Hodges ; oration, '• Modern Individualism," Ray G. Light ; oration, 



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163 



" The Uncrowned King," John C. Rupp; octette, 'Tis Morn, Adam Geibel, 

E. Hamilton, F. Hartman, R. G. Light, E. E. Ludwig, A. K. Mills, E. 
V. Hodges, E. E. Knauss, L. D. Herr ; essay, " Lincoln and His Humor," 
C. E. Shenk ; piano solo, Frank Hartman. 

After the entertainment a reception was given by the society. 

The following officers were elected for the remainder of the term in 
the Philokosmian literary society : President, Merle M. Hoover ; vice 
president, A. W. Herrman ; recording secretary, L. J. Appenzellar ; cor- 
responding secretary, S. B. Long ; editor, M. F. Lehman ; treasurer, P. 

F. Esbenshade ; chaplain, M. O. Snyder ; critic, M. E. Metzger ; pianist, 
I. S. Seitz ; janitor, Rex John ; assistant, Lester Spessard. 

Iowa Senate Reveres Dead Bishop 

Although dead and buried for several months, encomiums still re- 
echo the useful career of Bishop E. B. Kephart, who was once the most 
stalwart and ablest bishop of the United Brethren church. Recently the 
widow, Mrs. Kephart, received an engrossed copy of a set of resolutions, 
which were passed unanimously by the Senate of the state of Iowa. A 
reproduced copy follows: 

"Whereas An all wise Providence has removed from among us so 
very suddenly and unexpectedly Hon. Ezekiel B. Kephart, an honorable 
member of the Upper House of the General Assembly of the State of 
Iowa, in the years 1872 to 1876, who assisted in the revision of the Code 
of Iowa, and who in the main shaped the present school law of the State 
and arranged the system of normal institutes,was a man of great admini- 
strative ability, eminent in scholarship, a distinguished jurist, the ack- 
nowledged parliamentarian of his church, authority upon all church law, 
was possessed of great social qualities, whose domestic relations were 
most beautiful, dignifying and glorifying the home life, a type of Christ- 
ian citizen, loving, intelligent, catholic, noble and pure, optimistic in his 
views, looking out hopefully into the future and believing that for the 
Church and our honored nation there is a brighter day. A manly man, 
a true patriot, an honored citizen, loved and respected by all with whom 
he came in contact. He was elected to the presidency of Western College 
this State in 1869 and served in that capacity thirteen years. He was 
elected Bishop of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ in 1881. 



164 



THE FORUM 



In this capacity he served his Church twenty-four years. There- 
fore in view of his noble life, his lofty character and his eniment 
services be it; 

Resolved \ That in the death of Honorable Ezekiel B. Kephart we 
have lost an illustrious citizen, a wise counsellor and a true patriot. His 
family has lost a faithful and devoted husband and a loving father, the 
community a valued and esteemed friend and the Church one of its nob- 
lest and ablest men. And be it further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be entered on the Journal of the 
Senate and that an engrossed copy be presented to the wife and daughters 
of the deceased by the Secretary of the Senate. ' ' 

W. C. Stuckslger, 
James Elerick, 
R. C. Stirton, 
Attest : Committee 
Geo. A. Newman, Secretary of Senate. 

X X 

College Notes 

Rev. E. H. Gerhart, pastor of the First Lutheran Church, of Ann- 
ville, addressed the Tuesday evening prayer meeting, Apr. 3. He took 
for his subject Rom. 13-14: "But put ye on the Lord Jesus Christ." 
Rev. Gerhart said that we should put on Christ as a justifying garment, 
as a sanctifying garment, as a beautiful garment and as a perfect garment. 
We can attain all these by faith. Faith receives, love gives. This faith 
can be received only through prayer. 

Mr. W. J. Miller, state secretary of the Y. M. C. A., led the chapel 
exercises on Monday morning, April 9, and gave a short talk on the 
boldness of Christ. He spoke of Christ's boldness in seeking truth, and 
in standing for it. It costs something to stand for the truth. Each of 
us has temptations. If we yield we will be the weaker. Christ was bold 
in standing against sin and bold in attempting a great mission. We 
should have a high ideal and aim to reach it. 

The faculty propose to abolish the one long senior thesis, and to 
substitute in its place three theses from different departments, probably, 
one in history, one in ethics and one in English literature. If this plan 
is carried out, it will be superior to the former custom, and will be far 



THE FORUM 



165 



more beneficial to the individual student. The principal results of this 
new plan will be more thorough original research. The one thesis re- 
quired some research, but only in one line, and what the college student 
needs is a knowledge of different subjects. It is time enough to special- 
ize after the broad foundation, which a college education can give, has 
been acquired. Some objection may be raised on the ground that it will 
give three times as much work, but this is not true, for it is far more 
easier to write three papers of two thouand words each than to try to 
work out a subject, not broad enough to give a wide range of thought, 
or to write a long thesis upon which sufficient material cannot be found 
to make it the required length. The student who is only interested in 
one subject might object to this, because he desires to put all his time on 
his chosen work, but here he is making a mistake, for he can still devote 
the greater part of his time to his favorite subject. But at the same time 
he will be broadening his knowledge on other subjects that will be of 
benefit to him in almost any line of work that he may take up after leav- 
ing college. 

Prof. S. H. Derickson has re-organized the biological field club. The 
officers are : Ethel Myers, president ; George H. Hoffer, vice president ; 
Effie Shroyer, secretary ; C. Ray Bender, treasurer. Last spring the 
club made a trip of inspection to Penryn. This spring the club proposes 
to make several trips. 

To be the last president of the present senior class is the distinction 
accorded Charles Frey. The other officers are : Andrew Bender, vice 
president ; Ruth Hershey, secretary ; J. C. Strayer, treasurer. This was 
the senior class' last election. 

The biological field club held its regular monthly meeting at the 
home of Prof. S. H. Derrickson, Wednesday evening, April n. The 
professor gave a talk on the owls of this state. Margaret Berlin made a 
report on the clubs' collection of weasels and skunks. Prof, and Mrs. 
Derickson entertained the club nicely. 

Miss Cornina Crowell, a senior at Wellesley College, spent a week 
at the College this month, as the guest of Miss Bessie Trovillo, the pre- 
ceptress at the Ladies' Hall. A number of social functions were held in 
her honor. On the evening of April 4, Miss Trovillo entertained her 
students of the German language with Miss Crowell as an invited guest. 
The next afternoon Miss Trovillo gave an at home in her honor. Friday 



166 



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evening, April 6, Miss Crowell was the honored guest at a social gather- 
ing given by Miss Reba Lehman, the librarian. The same afternoon, 
she was entertained by Prof. J. K. Jackson. Prof, and Mrs. Schlichter, 
on Tuesday evening, April 10, gave a dinner to which she was invited as 
the guest of honor. 

Prof. Lehman, assisted by some of the students in the engineering 
department, made a survey of the campus, Thursday, April 12, for some 
legal purpose. 

X X 

College Calendar For Nay 

May 4. Philo Anniversary. 

5. Base ball, Deleware College. 

5. Modern Language Club. 

9. Biological Field club. 
12. Base ball, Susquehanna. 
12. Play, "The Rivals." 
14. Conservatory students recital. 

21. Gratuate recital — Elsie Arnold — voice. 

22. M " — May Berger — piano. 

23. " " — Margaret Berlin — piano. 

24. " " — L. D. Herr— organ. 

25. " " — Lizzy Hiesley — organ. 

26. " " —Edith King— voice. » 
26. Modarn Language club. 
28. Students' recital. 

28. Graduate recital — Iva Maulfair — piano. 

29. " " — Lucile Mills — voice. 
31. Annville High School Commencement in College Chapel. 

X X 

Special Session of the Trustees 

A special meeting of the college board of trustees was held in the 
President's office, Tuesday, April 10. The ratification of Dr. A. P. 
Funkhouser's election to the presidency and find arrangements for a 
$50,000 loan constituted the major part of the business transacted. 
President of the board, S. F. Engle, called the meeting to order. 

As successor to Dr. H. U. Roop, the executive committee a month 
ago decided upon Dr. A. P. Funkhouser who took up the presidency imme- 



THE FORUM. 



167 



diately, but his election was not approved by the entire trustee board un- 
til the last special session. 

After careful calculation, the trustees concluded that all the indebted- 
ness now standing and that which will accrue through the completion of 
the buildings now in course of construction can be liquidated by a loan 
of $50,000. A bond issue of that amount will be made through a Harris- 
burg trust company. 

This is a small amount of indebtedness as compared with the magni- 
ficent equipment that we now have. Our facilities are far from being 
exhausted. Lebanon Valley's student body is too small for the plant 
and the capital invested therein. This matter as well as other things 
that concern Lebanon Valley's finances will be enlarged upon by President 
Funkhouser in our next number. 

It is not probable that the board of trustees will meet again until 
commencement week, in June. 

Colleges and College Men 

A number of Yale alumni are trying to nominate congressman Her- 
bert Parsons to the seat in the Yale corporation, which will be vacant 
when Senator Depew's term as fellow ends. 

Otterbein expects to have a new ladies' dormitory in the near future. 
It will be called the Phillip G. Cochran Memorial Hall. A sketch of the 
building appears in the March number of the Otterbein Aegis. 

Schulykill Seminary has received a gift of $25,000, from Messrs. 
Yeager, and Krause, of Reading. 

The University of Cambridge won the annual University boat race 
from Oxford on April 7. The race was on the Thames from Putney to 
Mortlake, a distance of four and one half miles. The time was eighteen 
minutes. 

It is said that Indiana is the only state that has a solid delegation of 
College-bred men in both houses of Congress. Formerly Massachusetts 
occupied first place in this respect. 

State and the Indians have made an agreement to play their annual 
football game for the next four years, at Williamsport. 

State won the state championship debate by defeating Dickinson, at 
Philadelphia, Thursday evening, April T2. 



168 



THE FORUM 



Base Ball 

The base ball season started on April 7 with a defeat at the hands of 
Gettysburg. Reese started to pitch the game and showed good form un- 
til the fourth inning, when, complaining of a sore arm, he was replaced 
by Becker. Becker was batted out of the box in one inning and Brenne- 
man finished the game in a creditable manner. The final score was 20 
to 6 in Gettysburg's favor. The game throughout was rather poorly 
played by Lebanon Valley. 

The game with the Indians on Saturday, April 14, resulted in ano- 
ther defeat by the score of 7 to 6. The game was close and interesting 
throughout. In the first two innings, through tne wildness of Gardiner 
and Mt. Pleasant and opportune hitting by Pauxtis, McAndrews, and 
Maxwell, Lebanon Valley secured a lead, which they kept until the 
sixth inning when timely hits and two costly errors gave the Indians 
four runs and placed them in the lead, which they kept to the end of the 
game. Reese pitched fine ball for six innings, having ten strike-outs to 
his credit. Pauxtis replaced him in the seventh and, although he had a 
sore arm, he held the Indians down to no score for the remainder of the 
game. For the Indians Roy pitched in splendid style. The score : 



Lebanon Valley 


R. H. 


0. 


A. 


E. 


Indians 


R. H. 


O. 


A. 


E. 


Oldham, 2b 


2 





2 


2 





Roy, ib p 


3 


6 


1 


1 


Pauxtis, c 


2 


2 


11 


2 


1 


Young' r, cf 


1 


1 








McAndrews, 3b 


1 


1 





2 


1 


Balenti, rf 





2 








Maxwell, ib 





1 


11 








John'n, 2b 


2 


3 


3 





Guyer, cf 








1 








Pappan, ss 


2 2 


2 


3 





Carnes, ss 











2 


1 


Hen'ks, 3b 


1 1 








1 


Stehman, If 








2 


1 


1 


Arch'te, cf 


2 1 











Ludwig, rf 

















Baird, c 


1 1 


10 


1 





Reese, p 


1 








4 





Mt. Pl'nt, p 








2 





Waughtel, c 











1 





Gardiner, p 


1 


3 


1 





Totals 


6 


4 


27 




4 


Totals 


7 11 


37 


1 1 


2 


Lebanon Valley 








3300 


000 





0- 


-6 


Indians 












0200 


140 





0- 


-7 



Base ball well deserves its place as the ideal American sport. Be- 
cause of the relaxation it affords, the science and splendid bodily exer- 
cise found in it, it is one of the best of athletic games. To a student 
desiring relaxation it affords an excellent chance for exercise with a min- 
imum of brutality and danger. The base ball season is on now, and in 
order to develop a winning team a large number of candidates for the 



THE FORUM 



169 



different teams is necessary. Let every man who has any ability come 
out and try for one of the teams. He will earn the place he deserves. 
More participation in all athletics should be taken by the general student 
body. Not until such a general participation is the rule and not the ex- 
ception in American colleges, will athletics reach their true place as in 
English schools where the "star" members on the foot ball, croquet 
and tennis teams, are afterward leading men in Parliament, in the foreign 
service and in the many different phases of public life. We should have 
more candidates for the second team. With thirty earnest candidates 
from the student body we could be assured of a successful season, for al- 
though we might not win the majority of games yet we could still call it 
successful for the results would be apparent next year, and the years 
following. ' 



Rensselaer f \ 
^.Polytechnic*^ 
Institute, 
%f Troy, N.Y. 

local examination! DroTided for. Send for* Catalogue. 


William H. Kreider 

CLASS OF 1894 

Attorn ey-at- Law 

S. E. Cor. Broad and Chestnut Stv, 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 


Standard Steam Laundry and 

Scouring OlorK$ t 
27 n. 7 Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

ALLEN F. WARD, Class of 1890, Prop. 

Prompt and Good Service Given. 


W. J. Baltzell, Class '84, 

Managing Editor of 

THE ETUDE, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Leading Musical Magazine in the United 
States. 



Lemberger's compound tar Lozenges 

IN BOXES— 25c, 10c and 5c. 

p 5n e l p y ar a e t d LEMBERGER & CO.'S PHARMACY, Lebanon, Pa. 

JOS. L. LEMBERGER, Ph. M. FRANK GLEIM Ph.G. 



Cofnef Jflain and manhelm Streets, 

flnnville, Penn'a. 

Atouays has on Hand a pull bine of 



HARRY LIGHT 

AfiD UHJIDOwi SHHDHS 

Paper and Shade flanging a Specialty. 



THE FORUM. 



Uhe Charm of Sndividualiti/ 

Ttyarks every portrait produced by 

Sates' Studio 



142 tfortA 8th Street, 
^Discount to Students. 



jCebanon, !Penn* a. 

Speciai Spates to Classes' 



FOR THE LATEST 
AND BEST IN . , . 



HATS 



And MEN'S 
FURNISHINGS 



to Erb & Craumer 



777 Cumb, St., 



LEBANON 



$. m. Sbenk's 
Bakery 

Has always on hand 

f re$b Bread, gake$ and Rolls 

ANNVILLE, PA, 

One door west of Pennsylvania House. 



R Complete fllusie Store 

PIANOS, > * * ORGANS, 
VIOLINS, - GUITARS, - MANDOLINS, 
BANJOS, SHEET MUSTC and BOOKS. 

Musical Goods of all kinds at Lowest Prices. 
Phonographs and Graphophones from $io to $50. 
15,000 Edison and Columbia Records to select from. 

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I 



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Contents. 




The Success of Failure 


169 


Modern Individualism 


173 


Editorial . 


176 


The Junior Play 


179 


The Inter-class Debate 


180 


1907 Bizarre .... 


181 


The Fortieth Anniversary of Lebanon Valley 




College 


181 


Alumni Notes . 


183 


Religious Life 


185 


The Attendance of the College 


186 


Society Notes 


187 


Calendar for June 


188 


Special Rates to Commencement 


-LOO 


College Notes 


189 


Base Ball ...... 


192 




THE FORUM. 

Vo lume XIX. MAY, 1906 Number 8 

The Success of Failure 

HE ground is white with cherry blossoms. They are heaped in 
little snow drifts beneath the tree. They are beautiful and yet 
we pity them, for they are fallen blossoms. They will produce 
no fruit. They are failures. And yet we forget that it was 
necessary that those blossoms fall from the bloom-crowded branches in 
order that the ones left upon the tree might produce the perfect fruit. 
Then it is that we realize that the fate of the fallen cherry blossoms is 
not pathetic but is glorious. 

What a hard word is failure ! How often that word has been writ- 
ten across the records of man ! 

" The best laid schemes o' mice an' men, 

Gang- oft aglay, 
And leave us nought but grief and pain, 
For promised joy." 
But perhaps if we analyze these failures in a broad spirit, we would 
find that like the fallen cherry blossoms many of those things which we 
call failures in life are not so in the last analysis. 

The shores of time are strewn with wrecks. So many times man in 
his weakness has failed to accomplish that which he has striven to attain. 
So many times man has experienced the agony of plans, baffled, of hopes, 
crushed, that the pessimist would tell us that the history of man has 
been only a history of failures. It would be difficult therefore to select 
the world's greatest disappointment. Yet it seems to me that the acme 
of it all was reached nineteen hundred years ago when two men were 
walking along a hot, dusty road in Judea. Keen disappointment and 
defeat showed in their countenances. As they journeyed, heavy of heart, 
they spoke sadly of the happenings of the week. So absorbed were they 
in their sorrow that they scarcely noticed a third traveller who walked 
by their side. He asked of them the subject of their earnest conversa- 
tion and they answered him by telling him a story filled with anguish. 
Their sorrow reached its climax in these words : "But we hoped that 



170 THE FORUM 

it was he who should redeem Israel." Can you conceive of greater dis- 
appointment than this? They were Jews, they who longed yearningly 
for one to come who would restore them to their former glory He of 
whom they spoke had by his character, by descent, and by his acts ful- 
filled every prophecy as the promised Messiah. They had followed him 
with fervent, patriotic faith, believing sincerely that they would be with 
him when he would be crowned King of the Jews in all his glory But 
a few days before he had been executed, cruelly crucified without lifting 
a finger in his own defense. Hence to them he was a failure. But was 
his death a failure ? They thought so ; but we know that out of earth's 
greatest sorrow which they experienced that day has come earth's great- 
est joy. His death was one of the fallen cherry blossoms, but by his fall 
was produced the greatest fruitage that the world has ever known 

Man has learned by experience that many of his defeats have result- 
ed in his greatest triumphs. There are no nations which have always 
been successful. Some of them have succumbed to adversity and are now 
spoken of as dead nations, while others have risen above their failures 
As we look back over the history of our own beloved nation there is no 
darker period than that of the Civil War. When it was over they spoke 
of a lost cause. The South was defeated, ruined and humiliated. Those 
principles for which she fought were dead issues. For the south the war 
was a failure, and yet as we look backward today we see that the war was 
really their greatest blessing. Today the South is awakening to an era of 
prosperity which would have been utterly impossible, had slavery that 
institution for which they fought so bravely, succeeded. We hear of the 
solid South" in politics, but not only in politics, but in many other 
ways there is a spirit of unity and brotherhood among the states of the 
South which could not have been possible had the principles of state sov- 
ereignty been successful. Yes, slavery and state rights were fallen 
petals from the cherry tree which had to drop in order that more beauti- 
tul and greater principles might flourish. 

The chips of marble fall one by one from the chisel of the sculptor 
We look at them with pity. They are waste products, useless things.' 
But let us.not forget that they must fall away in order that the statue 
may stand forth in all its beauty. So have been the lives of many men 
Many centuries ago a man, whose name every scholar reveres, taught the 
youths of his beloved city. They loved him and honored the methods 
and principles which he upheld. But in time he won enemies trough 



THE FORUM 171 



his teachings, beautiful and good as they were. He was tried and con- 
demned to death and although a word, a desire to retract those princi- 
ples for which he lived, would have saved him, yet he refused to do so 
and died as bravely as he had lived. The friends of Socrates saw only 
failure in his death. But through his death lived those principles which 
make his name revered, principles which have become parts of great sys- 
tems of philosophy, and many a man has been made stronger and better 
by considering his death. The world has known many others whose 
lives have been apparent failure but in reality they were the seemingly 
useless chips of marble which have fallen in order that the principles for 
which they died might stand forth great and beautiful. 

Thus man has learned that failures have always come into the lives 
of men throughout history. Failures must come into the life of every 
normal man and we wonder why it is so. But there is a philosophy of 
it. ' 'Sweet are the uses of adversity' ' is an old proverb whose truth can 
not be questioned; Let us see if we can find some of the reasons why 
the bitter is mixed with the sweet in our lives. 

Is there any one who does not feel real joy in facing a gale of wind? 
He is a poor sort of man and has a weak brand of manhood, whose mus- 
cles do not harden and whose spirits do not rise when he faces a storm. 
Thus many times the storms of adversity bring out our best energies. 
George Macdonald said of Milton "I do believe God wanted a grand 
poem from that man and so blinded him that he might write it." The 
world knows what the blind poet accomplished. This is one of the pur- 
poses of failure, and if you are made of heroic stuff the storm of adversity 
will only cause you to send forth energies, greater and stronger than you 
have ever known before. 

Failure often actually leads a man towards the goal of success and 
he follows the leading ignorant of its purpose. When Commodore 
George Dewey received orders in 1897 placing him in command of the 
Asiatic squadron he went obediently and unquestionably, although he 
knew he was a victim of a naval clique, who wished to give him the most 
remote and worst station at their command. But on the morning of May 
1, 1898 Dewey had turned his apparent failure into success, as all the 
world knows. So it is with many, many misfortunes which beset us. 
Although we do not know it, they may be leading us onward to sure suc- 
cess and towards opportunities of which we had not even dreamed before. 



172 THE FORUM 

Failure often puts man in a more suitable place. In 1886 Theodore 
Roosevelt ran for mayor of New York City and failed of election. If he 
had succeeded, says his biographer, he would have sought re-election and 
would have been carried too far out of the track of national politics to 
have been a candidate for assistant secretary of state under Harrison 
Had Mr. Blaine favored, instead of opposing and defeating him, for this 
office he would never have become famous as civil service commissioner. 
Again if he had secured the appointment which he coveted in the staff of 
General Fitzhugh I,ee he would not have organized the regiment of 
Rough Riders and become the most picturesque figure in the volunteer 
army. He was never downed by defeat but each failure always seemed 
to fit him for some better position. Many a failure cominginto our lives 
is doing the same for each one of us, if we only knew it. 

In the "Bad Lands " of North Dakota grows a very interesting 
tree called the diamond willow. When the diamond willow begins to 
grow it sends up a very thrifty, promising shoot, and gives every token 
of developing into a large, beautiful tree. But as soon as the little twigs 
and branches begin to die down, it sets all the sap and life of the tree to 
work building little diamond-shaped tombs about the spot where each 
branch died, and it so devotes itself to this work that it is in maturity a 
very dwarfed scrubby tree. Many men are like the diamond willow 
The failures which have come into their lives have been brooded over so 
much that their growth has been stunted and their lives have become 
entire failures. 

How different is the story of the great pine tree. That tree only 
grows the higher because some of their lower branches are broken Its 
failures only serve to make it stronger and greater and more determined 
to gain its place in the upper air. 

The lesson is plain to us. Don't be diamond willows brooding over 
your failures, but be the great pine and use your failures as incentives to 
allow you to catch the inspiration and the glory of the upper air. 

Yes failures are not always so in the last analysis. They are often 
truly blessings in disguise. When the next one comes into your life — 
today and if not today, then tomorrow, for they are bound to come 
don't back away in defeat from it. But thank a kindly providence for 
it, brace yourself against it, overturn it, then stand upon it, and reach up 
and get a grip upon higher and better things. 

M. M. Hoovbr, '06 



THE FORUM 



173 



Modern Individualism 

IVE HUNDRED years before Christ, there lived in the classic? 
country of Greece a man by the name of Protagoras. He 
taught that man is the measure of all things, and his doctrine 
was representative of a class of men known as Sophists. They 
were held in disfavor and the public ban was placed on their teachings, 
because the people feared that it would subvert government. Civilization 
had not yet advanced so far that governments could safely and consis* 
tently recognize the rights and importance of the individual. The 
individual existed for the state, not the state for the individual. The 
common good was the highest good and the individual was compelled to 
sacrifice for the sake of the community. This was custom ; this was 
tradition. 

Now we believe differently. The highest good of the individual is 
the highest common good. The state exists for the individual, not 
the individual for the state. Are we right ? Was the ancient wrong ? 

The ancients denied themselves much good in order that they might 
avoid much evil. We accept much evil rather than not secure much 
good. But, do our advantages compensate for our widespread evil? 
That is a problem. Of several things we are certain. There is much 
evil, and it arises out of the fact that the individual is granted much free- 
dom. Either not all men can understand that the highest good of the 
individual is the highest common good, or they do not fully realize 
themselves. For modern individualism is selfish and very narrow. Man 
sees no good beyond his own. When he thinks he is altruistic, he is in 
reality selfish. Few people pray as much for their brother's good as 
they do for their own. Few people love their neighbors as themselves. 
Man first of all seeks his own advantage ; that of the rest, afterwards. 
He seeks to get all he can, and to keep all he gets. Such are some of 
the qualities of modern individualism, and the evils consequent upon it 
are great. 

An all-consuming devotion to it will pervert one's judgement and 
conscience. It limits the vision, shutting out the wonderful needs of 
the world and the great good that may, and ought to be, accomplished 
by the proper application of the powers which one possesses. It will 
render the individual obdurate to the pitiable call of the masses and 
cause him to withhold the sympathy and compassion that are like a 



I 



174 THE FORUM 

healing balm to them. We as a christian country hold correct theories 
of living, but we are woefully in error in our practise. We believe in 
submission to the powers that be and in consecrated service to our 
fellowmen. But this hatefully selfish and narrow individualism makes 
us blind to those virtues. Man thinks too much that the state exists for 
the individual ; that his rights are above those of the state. And this 
constitutes the great danger in our modern individualism. There is no 
evil which tends to ruin and disintegrate the existing order of things so 
much as it does, not even intemperance. 

It is the direct purpose of modern individualism to break laws ; and 
where they are impossible to be broken, to escape them. Its tendencies 
are anarchistic. Man in his mad, blind and giddy course for the satis- 
faction of self will surely come into conflict with the rights of others. 
His course is impossible where there is law and order. Thus our modern 
demagogues are coming to have a disrespect for law, because it so often 
is an obstacle in the accomplishment of a selfish purpose. Therefore 
they support well-paid lobbyists in our national and state legislative halls 
for the purpose of influencing the repeal and prevention of objectionable 
laws, and the enactment of laws favorable to their own individual enter- 
prises. We should perhaps be surprised if we knew how big an item in 
a corporations expenditures the money spent for legal proceedings and 
for the evasion of legal proceedings is. Whether a law is ethically or 
politically good is no consideration to them. The question is whether or 
not it will serve their purpose. The law is the clay and the rich man 
the potter. All the result of modern individualism is almost invariably 
materialistic. 

Such are some of the forms which modern individualism takes 
among the wealthier classes. But the spirit is not solely confined to 
them. It permeates all classes, both rich and poor. It is among the 
lower classes that this individualism is perhaps the most pernicious and 
productive of the most hateful results. There is not a more undesirable 
class than the do-as-you-please people. They think that their rights and 
interests dominate over all those of their neighbors. They think that 
their fellowmen exist expressly for their own individual subservience 
They are like brutes fighting tooth aud nail for what they consider 
their natural rights. And then they think they are zealously obeying the 
law of nature; and not of nature only but of God also, thus trying to 
give their inhuman and selfishly voracious conduct a divine sanction 



THE FORUM. 



175 



They are the ones who pull down and destroy all that is elevating and 
progressive. They are the ones who defy the laws that are thrown about 
them for their own physical and social safety. They are the ones who lower 
the standard of living. They are the ones who do not send their children 
to school for a greater part of the term and to a greater age than they are 
actually compelled by law. And it is just such children who are the 
mischief-makers on the street, both during the day and especially after 
dark when they are initiated into vice and crime. They are the insur- 
rectionists and the creators of lynch-law, mob-rule, and black hand 
organizatians. They are the assassins and kings. They are stayed 
hither and thither by passion just as a leaf is driven to and fro by the 
wind. There is no firmness, or stability in them. Their conduct must 
be subversive of all government. Where such individualism holds 
unchecked sway, politly can no more exist than it can among the 
tigers of the jungle. It is in fact the sum of all possible anti-social and 
anarchistic tendences. 

Was the ancient entirely wrong in his fears concerning individualism? 
I suspect not. If all men were highly educated and good, individualism 
and altruism would be identical, and we would rapidly be approaching 
the ideal state. But individualism at the present time is too far in 
advance for all people. Ray G Light, '06 



176 



THE FORUM 



THE FORUM. 



Vol. XIX. 



MAY, 1906. 



No. a 



Editor/in-Chief, 

A. W. HERRMAN, '07. 

Associate Editors, 



EDWARD E. KNAUSS, '07 



ETHEL MYERS, '07 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS : 



M. R. METZGER, '07 
S. R. OLDHAM, '08 



ERMA SHUPE, '08 
M. O. BILLOW, '08 



Business Managers : 

C. RAY BENDER, '07, Chief. 
ASSISTANTS 



R. J. GUYER, '08 



G. M. RICHTER, '09 



The Forum is published each month during the college year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College. 

TERMS :— Subscription price, 50 cents a Year. Single copy, 10 cents. 

All business matter should be addressed to The Forum, Annville, Pa. ; all literary matter to 
A. W. Herrman, Annville, Pa. 

Subscribers failing to receive The Forum regularly will please notify us promptly. 

Subscribers who have changed their residence would confer a great favor by notifying us of the 
change, giving both the old and the new address. We can not be held responsible for any irregularity 
if this is neglected. 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as second-class mail matter. 



There is a movement on foot to drop the five dollar athletic fee from 
the college bills. This is to be done because a few students object to 
pay it. The student body as a whole will not endorse this action, for 
it will effect seriously athletics. 

There is no excuse for omitting the entire fee. The amount might 
be lowered to three dollars. If the fee, whatever the amount may be, 
is not made compulsory, it will devolve upon a certain class of students 
to support the athletic teams. Some few students there are who would 
not even then patronize the games. To saddle the burden of maintain- 
ing athletics upon a certain class of students would not be just. 

Those in authority must not forget, too, that the athletic association 
has a small debt. Without collecting an athletic fee, thereby making 
it almost impossible to navigate financially, we would like to know how 
that debt is to be cancelled. 



Editorial. 



THE FORUM 



177 



Some people think that college students are selfish and unsym- 
pathetic. This is an unjust view. It is true that they do not flaunt 
their philanthropic tendencies as do the uncultured. 

Only a few weeks ago, a fire left nearly destitute one of Annville's 
families. The students planned a benefit concert by our musical clubs. 
The concert was handeled just as though all the proceeds were to have 
gone to the clubs. Students, who would not have attended the concert 
had it not been given to aid the stricken family, turned out to the last 
man. 

In this respect, we believe that the students of Lebanon Valley 
hold about the same ideals that are held by all other student bodies. 
That being the case, we are forced to conclude that college students are 
not selfish and unsympathetic. 

* * * 

College spirit as it finds expression before the alumnus graduates 
differs slightly from that which clings to him after graduation. Yet 
this feeling for his alma mater generally is not, and should not be, less 
genuine for the change. It is difficult to estimate the interest that 
graduates have in their alma mater, unless some opportunity be given to 
test them. 

The graduates of Lebanon Valley College, just now, have a chance 
to show to the undergraduates and to all others associated with the 
College how they appreciate their college careers spent here. All 
the alumni know that great things are under way for great expansion 
at Lebanon Valley. In this venture, we need the aid of the Alumni 
Association. 

With a science hall and a gymnasium added to the present array 
of seven buildings on the campus, Lebanon Valley would have an 
equipment second to none of all the colleges, not only in this state, but 
anywhere. There are two more things that we need. They are a large 
endowment and established professorships. 

Several years ago, the Alumni Association had raised quite a sum 
toward the establishment of a professorship. The association is much 
more able now to do something. The college appreciates the annual 
alumni junior oratorical prices, but we believe that the association will 
this spring come to our aid in a much more liberal way. 



178 



THE FORUM 



We make this suggestion to the alumni in good faith and with the 
utmost sincerity, believing that our need will not escape their attention. 
Graduates of the blue and white, no matter where you are when you 
read this, kindly pause for a few moments' meditation. How you must 
have enjoyed your college days! To us undergraduates they mean 
more than we can express with our pleasant surroundings. 

There was a time when a diploma from Lebanon Valley did not 
mean very much, but that day is no more. It is now a creditable 
achievement to finish one of the five courses under our present faculty 
and with our present equipment. 

Some of you older alumni, if you do not think much of your 
diploma, brace up and be proud of the progress of your alma mater. 
All alumni should attend this year's commencement, and the fortieth 
anniversary of the College. 

* * * 

Examinations have been instituted, this year, in the music depart- 
ment. Heretofore, the music students have been unclassified, with 
the exception of those graduating; By the present arrangement every 
music student will know, just the same as the literary students, what 
year they will graduate. This seems advisable in many ways. It will 
be possible now to classify the music students, instead of grouping them 
with the preparatory students, or with the special students. It also 
raises the standard of the department, for if a student cannot pass the 
examination, it will mean that commencement for that student is another 
year farther off. 

The students have always been required to cover a certain 
amount of ground, but as long as they practised and took their 
lessons, nothing further was required of them. Now, they must be 
able to play a certain number of pieces and be able to play them correctly 
in public. This will mean that no student will leave the Conservatory 
without being able to play well in public, and this part alone means much 
to the student. No student unless possessed of some unusual ability 
will be able to graduate in less than three years. 

* * * 

What do you know about that junior play? It came off in great 
style. Hats off to the juniors! 



THE FORUM. 



179 



The first interclass debate was alright. Keep up the good work. 

* * * 

Lebanon Valley is keeping abreast of the college world in literary 
accomplishments. She will soon be setting the pace for the smaller 
colleges in the east. 

* * * 

The Forum is late this month. The printers ought, shall and will 
take the blame. 

The Junior Play 

"The Rivals, " a comedy by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, was 
presented in the Engle Music Hall, by the Junior class, on May 12, with 
only two months preparation. This play was the best thing of its kind 
ever given at Lebanon Valley. It was a great boost for the Junior 
class. The parts were chosen so that the naturalness of the person 
fitted the character assumed. The selections could not have been made 
any better. In no part did any character show signs of weakness. 

There were two changes of scenery, most of which had been made 
by members of the class. That for " The North Parade " was the more 
vivid. The costumes, which were hired from a Philadelphia firm, were 
handsome, and set off the performers to the point of excellency. 

Two vocal solos by Miss Cecelia Oldham and Arthur Spessard, and 
two piano solos by Miss Verna Stengle and EH Faus, were rendered 
between the acts. 

More than three hundred people were present. All the seats were 
reserved, except those on the gallery. The audience frequently 
applauded the young actors and actresses. Just before the curtain was 
drawn in the last scene, a shower of bouquets was hurled on the plat- 
form by persons in the front rows. 

The success of the play was largely due to the untiring patience of 
Prof, and Mrs. N. C. Schlichter and Miss Edith H. Baldwin. The two 
former coached the play, and Miss Baldwin planned the scenery. The 
Junior class owes a debt of gratitude to these three persons. 

The characters and where they live are Sir Anthony Absolute, 
Elias M. Gehr, Cedar Lane; Captain Jack Absolute, Edward E. Knauss 



180 



THE FORUM 



Jr., York; Faukland, Maurice R. Metzger, Middletown; Bob Acres, 
Max F. Lehman, Annville; Sir Lucius O. Trigger, Park F. Esbenshade, 
Bird-in-Hand; Fag, John Sprecher, Lebanon; David, William E. Herr, 
Annville; Mrs. Malaprop, Miss Mary Peiffer, Lebanon; Lydia Languish, 
Miss Lucile Mills, Annville; Julia, Miss H. Ethel Myers, Mount Joy; 
Lucy, Miss Effie Shroyer, Shamokin. 

C. Ray Bender, of Halifax, had charge of the business end of the 
play. To him is due the credit for the financial success. Were it not 
that the spring term is so nearly at an end, Mr. Bender would secure 
engagements for the rendition of " The Rivals " by the Junior class at 
several towns in Lebanon County. 

"The Rivals" ought to be a good advertisement for " As you like 
It," which will be given during the second to the last week of this term. 

The Inter-class Debate 

For the first time in the history of the College, two classes met, May 
17, in an inter-class debate. To the classes of 1908 and 1909 belongs 
the honor of originating this phase of college work here. The debate 
was not at all one sided, good arguments being presented by the affirma- 
tive and negative speakers. The appreciation of the students, faculty 
and friends was shown by the large attendance. We hope that this line 
of work will be continued, and finally result in the formation of a college 
debating team. The judges gave their decision in favor of the affirma- 
tive, complimenting the negative side for their arrangement of argu- 
ments, and the third affirmative speaker for his strong line of arguments. 
Besides the debate Miss Stengle played a piano solo and Arthur Spessard 
sang a solo. Both were rendered in a very creditable manner. Prof. N. 
C. Schlichter acted as presiding officer for the evening. The judges 
were Rev. H. E. Miller, Lebanon; Dr. E. Benj. Bierman, Annville; 
Rev. E. H. Gerhart, Annville. The subject and speakers were as follows: 

Debate — Resolved, that the influence of great poets is deeper and 
more abiding than that of successful generals. 

Affirmative 1908— Stanley R. Oldham, J. L. Appenzellar, M. O. 
Billow; Negative 1909 — Oliver Mease, W. E. Hamilton, G. M. Richter. 



i 



THE FORUM 



181 



1907 Bizarre 

The college annual, the Bizarre, published each year by the Junior 
class is rapidly nearing completion. It was sent to the book binders 
May 24. There should be no delay in the completion of the book and 
unless something unforeseen happens the book will appear about the 
first week in June. Besides the usual amount of cuts of the faculty, 
literary societies, athletic teams, classes and so forth, there will be an 
unusually large number of pictures. Pictures, more than anything else, 
help to make an annual pleasing, as well as interesting. With this end 
in view the class has a collection consisting of interior views of the 
dormitories, library building, the chapel, scenes of Nashville, Tenn., views 
around Annville, dining hall pictures and others too numerous to men- 
tion. 

Excellent cuts have been secured of all the new and old buildings. 
The staff has put forth its best efforts to make this Bizarre the best 
annual ever published here. 

The cover will have a crimson back ground with " Bizarre 1907 " in 
steel, the colors of the class. 

Accompaning each regular individual cut of the different members 
of the Junior class will be a cut of the person found in his or her every 
day life around the college. The annual has been dedicated to Hon. W. 
H. Ulrich, of Hummelstown, Pa., ex-president of the Board of Trutees. 
The staff has done its best and hopes to please every one. As usual the 
price of the book will be $1.25. 

3C ST 

The Fortieth Anniversary of Lebanon Valley College 

Lebanon Valley College is one of the youngest institutions of its kind 
in Pennsylvania. Yet the coming commencement marks the close of its 
fortieth year. In view of this fact, the authorities have decided to cele- 
brate the event with services befitting the occasion. The regular 
program of commencement will be carried out as usual, and the special 
event will be commemorated by additional appropiate exercises, which 
will be announced at the proper time, when all plans and arrangements 
shall have been consummated. 

Founded at a time when the prejudice against higher education was 
deep and potent in the United Brethren Church, the early history of the 



182 



THE FORUM 



college is the story of a struggle against tremendous odds. Even some 
of those high in authority were opposed to colleges, and college-bred men 
and women for positions in and out of the Church, for in the United 
Brethren Church at Annyille, a bishop preached against education from 
the text, "Knowledge Puffeth up". With these prejudices largely 
overcome, and with the church united on the subject of higher education, 
with the substantial progress made in the equipment of the College and 
m the standard of its work and requirements, the friends of the institu- 
tion can look forward to a happy celebration of the fortieth anniversary 
of its founding. 

The exercises of the commencement season begin on Thursday, June 
7, with the junior oratorical contest for the Alumni prizes. Heretofore 
this contest was held on the Tuesday evening immediately preceding 
commencement day, having replaced the regular Alumni exercises of 
preceding years. This arrangement crowded the Alumni banquet to the 
late hours of the evening. At the business meeting of the association 
last year it was recommended that the entire evening of Tuesday be 
given to the Alumni business meeting and banquet. Acting on this 
recommendation the faculty fixed Thursday evening as the time for the 
contest. The contest this year promises to be an unusually good one 

Students of the college will again render a Shakespearean play in 
the Conservatory auditorium, on Saturday evening, under the direction 
of the department of English and the department of public speaking 
The play selected for this year is " As You Like It." The successful 
performance of "The Merchant of Venice " last year, under the same 
direction, and " The Rivals" on the twelfth of May, this year, bespeak 
for the rendition of "the sweetest and happiest of Shakespeare's 
comedies ' ' a great success. 

On Sunday and Monday the regular program will be carried out as 
follows: Sunday morning, baccalaureate sermon by President Funk- 
houser; Sunday evening, address before the Christian Association; Mon- 
day, 2 to 5 p. m., art exhibit; 7:45, p. m ., commencement of the depart- 
ment of Music. 

On Tuesday morning will occur the annual meeting of the Board of 
Trustees, and in the afternoon the class day exercises of the class of 
1906. In the evening, in addition to the Alumni banquet and business 
meeting, ot interest only to members of the Alumni, the undergraduate 
classes will hold banquets to which they will invite their friends thus 



THE FORUM 



183 



giving every one an opportunity to enjoy the evening. If the weather 
is favorable the banquets will be held in the open air, if not arrange- 
ments will be made by which they can be held indoors. This is a unique 
feature of commencement week, and one to which the students of the 
College and Academy are looking forward with increasing interest. 

The commencement address on Wednesday will be delivered by 
Rev. E. A. Dunning, of Boston, editor of the Congregationalist. It is 
on the afternoon of this day that the special anniversary exercises take 
place. The program for this occasion is not yet announced, but it will 
be especially appropriate. It will be followed by the class re-unions 
later in the afternoon. The executive committee of the Alumni Associ- 
ation is co-operating with the different classes in the effort to have as 
complete an attendance as possible at these re-unions. Some of the 
classes are arranging for special banquets of their own during the week; 

It has been suggested, and we regard it as exceedingly appropriate, 
that when the graduate classes are holding their re-unions, the students 
of the Old Annville Academy hold a re-union in the Academy Building. 
The Annville Academy was the local predecessor of Lebanon Valley 
College. The building became the nucleus of the college plant, and 
many men who had been educated in the Academy became warm friends 
and enthusiastic supporters of the College. The Academy was founded 
in 1834, and was an institution of merit, having attracted to its halls a 
large number of students who achieved marked success in after life. 
We see no reason why there could not be assembled more then thirty of 
these students who would find great delight in relating the reminiscences 
of their early school days. 

The fortieth anniversary should inspire the friends of the College to 
greater endeavors in behalf of its future welfare. 

Out of it should grow higher standards of excellency, and a zeal and 
enthusiasm for the college that will make it one of the best small colleges 
in the country. 

Alumni Notes 

Prof. N. C. Schlichter, '97, will be one of the lecturers at the Mount 
Gretna Chautauqua next summer. 



184 THE FORUM 

Dr. H. U. Roop, '92, is continuing his studies in anthropology at 
Yale. ' 

Ralph Engle and Titus Kreider, both of the class of '05, were recent 
visitors here. 

Claude R. Engle, '02, of Hummelstown, spent a day at the College 
enroute to Yale. 

G. Mason Snoke, 'oo, of Lebanon, was married to Alice Mock, of 
Millbach, May 18. 

Charles Fisher, '04, was a visitor recently. He filled Dr. Zuck's 
pulpit on Sunday morning, May 20. 

^ Miss May Hershey, '05, and E. E. Erb, '05, both of Hershey, were 
noticed in the audience at the junior play. 

David D. Brandt, '03, of Union Biblical Seminary, has gone to Cal- 
ifornia in the interests of the Bible Association. 

Harry M. Imboden, '99, and Miss Edith S. Graybill, '99, were re- 
cently married at Lancaster. " The Forum " extends congratulations 
to them. 

Raymond P. Daugherty, '97, at present principal of Albert Academy, 
Freetown, Africa, contemplates visiting his friends on this side of the 
Atlantic next month. 

Among the graduates of the Union Biblical Seminary at Dayton, are 
I. M. Hershey, '03, Adam K. Wier, '00, S. F. Dougherty, '01/ and 
Harry H. Heberly, '96. 

I. Moyer Hershey, '03, a divinity student at the United Brethren 
Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, has been appointed pastor of the Myerstown 
United Brethren Church. 

T. B. Beatty, '05, professor of English at Woodstock Academy, Vir- 
ginia, has accepted a position at Charksburg College, Mo., of which C. 
C. Peters, '05, is president. 

John D. Stehman, '99, formerly Y. M. C. A. secretary at Benning- 
ton, Vt., has returned to Columbia, this State, his former place of resi- 
dence. Mr. Stehman is not in good health. 



THE FORUM. 



185 



Religious Life 

L S. Seitz, '07, has resigned as pastor of the Reinoehlsville 
Methodist Church. 

J. B. Showers, '07, has accepted a United Brethren pastorate in the 
western part of the State. 

Lebanon Valley will send four men to Northfield this summer. They 
are E. M. Gehr, P. F. Esbenshade, S. B. Long and C. W. Shoop. 

Rev. Jananyn, an Armenian missionary, addressed the Y. M. C. A., 
May 6. A collection plate was passed and Rev. Jananyn got over five 
dollars. 

P. F. Esbenshade was the leader of the May missionary meeting. 
J. C. Strayer, E. M. Gehr, Effie Shroyer and Ora Harnish were the 
other speakers. 

E. M. Gehr, president of the local Y. M. C. A., attended the Y. M. 
C. A. Presidents' Conference at Gettysburg. He reports having had a 
pleasant and profitable time. 

The Student Volunteer recently organized here is doing excellent 
work. In the Y. W. C. A. a class of fifteen, and in the Y. M. C. A. one 
of ten, are studying " The Healing of the Nations." The missionary 
outlook is brighter than it has been for a number of years. 

The star course committee of the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A. 
held their final meeting on Tuesday, May 8. The committee closed a 
very successful season. The five numbers of the star course were given 
under the direction of The Central Lyceum Bureau, of Harrisburg, and 
were all very well received. The associations, under whose auspices the 
course was given, are to be congratulated in presenting one of the most 
successful that has appeared for some time. 

Below is an account of the financial result of the year's course. 

Total amount of money received during the year $385.28 
Total amount of expenditures during the year $241.25 
Balance in treasury $144.03 

Of this amount, the Y. W. C. A. receives one-third, or $48.01, and 
the Y. M. C. A. receives two-thirds, or $96.02. 

The committee wishes to thank all who in any way participated in 
the work of this year's star course and helped to make it successful. 



186 



THE FORUM 



The Attendance of the College 

At the opening of the school year in September, 1905, the attend- 
ance in all departments of the college was considered larger than in any 
former year by all those who have been connected with the institution 
for years. The requirements in the dining hall and the individual class- 
rooms confirmed this opinion, and the college publications together with 
the official reports of the president to the annual conferences attested the 
fact. That the actual attendance of this year is greater than heretofore 
is not generally disputed. 

The new catalogue, however, which is still in press, will show for 
this year an attendance in all departments of 361 as against 470 reported 
last year, an apparent decrease of 109. We call the attention of our pat- 
rons and friends to this discrepancy in order that they may properly 
understand the seemingly decreased attendance of the college when they 
get the figures in their possession. 

The habit of counting where there is nothing to count when it comes 
to making up lists of students is attributable to some of the small col- 
leges of America. One way in which this is done is to issue the college 
catalogue in April and then include in the list of students all those in 
actual attendance from April to April. 

Taking the ends of two college years to make up a fiscal year gives 
rise to a fictitious attendance, when this method of counting is used. 
There always are a considerable number of students, who come to college 
for but one year, but the above method of counting gets these students' 
names into two catalogues. The proper way to count is to enter those 
students' names who have actually matriculated from April to April. 

Another method of swelling the attendance is not to deduct all of the 
repeated names. Names are repeated because many students attend two 
or more departments at the same time and each department is credited 
with the names of the students in that particular department. 

The catalogue of Lebanon Valley College has been gotten out this 
year with a view to the presentation of the facts as they really are. 

The publication of this statement is requested by a unanimous vote 
of the faculty. W. C. Arnold, 

Registrar. 



THE FORUM 



187 



Society Notes 

On Friday, May 4, the Philokosmian literary Society celebrated its 
thirty-ninth anniversary exercises in the Conservatory auditorium. The 
room was tastefully decorated with bunting and lights in the society 
colors. After the exercises a reception was tendered to the friends of the 
society in the assembly room of the library building. A very large crowd 
was in attendance. The following was the program for the evening. 

Invocation, Rev. W. J. Zuck, D.D.; Piano Solo, (H. A. Wollen- 
haupt) Fantaisie sur "II Trovatore," E. A. Faus ; President's address, 
Max O. Snyder ; octette, (Frederick Field Bullard) On to the Field, H. 
E. Spessard, C. F. Clippinger, A. D. Flook, M. F. Lehman, E. A. 
Spessard, W. E. Herr, D. C. Weidler, A. R. Spessard ; oration, The 
Success of Failure, Merle M. Hoover ; oration, The Club of the Giant, 
Emanuel E. Snyder ; vocal solo, (Harry Eldridge) The Wondering 
Knight, Arthur R. Spessard ; eulogy, Sir William Herschel, Andrew 
Bender ; quartette, (Frederick Field Bullard) Stein Song, H. E. Spess- 
ard, M. F. Lehman, E. A. Spessard, A. R. Spessard ; essay, The 
Tyranny of the Mob, J. Curvin Stray er ; octette, (C. F. Shattuck) 
Turkey in the Straw. . 

The three literary societies still adhere to their custom of rendering 
programs for the senior classes in the literary and the music departments. 
The seniors were entertained by the Clios May 11, by the Kalos May 18 
and by the Philos May 25. Each society had a good program. The 
Clios served refreshments. 

New Bloomfield Academy wanted a debate with the Philo society, 
but the Philos rejected the proposition. In the first place, the Philos are 
too busy to work on a debate at so late a date, and in the second place, 
if the Philos had been inclined to debate, they would have united with 
the Kalos to join one of the college debating unions. 

There is some talk of Lebanon Valley being represented in one of 
the college debating unions next year. This matter will have to be 
looked after by the two male societies. There may be in a short time 
committees appointed by each society to co-operate in this matter. There 
is no reason why this should not be done. 

The Kalozetean society has elected these officers, C. Ray Bender, 
president; S. R. Oldham, vice-president; Edward E. Knauss Jr., record- 



188 



THE FORUM 



ing secretary; R. M. Major, corresponding secretary; Oliver Mease, 
critic; F. F. Hartman, pianist; N. K. Reifsnyder, sargeant-at-arms; 
Joseph Ellenberger, assistant; W. E. Hamilton, chaplain. 

Next term's officers of the Philokosmian Society have been elected. 
They are : P. F. Esbenshade, president; R. J. Guyer, vice-president; 
G. R. Kreider, recording secretary; Rex John, corresponding secretary; 
M. F. Eehman, critic; A. W. Herrman, chaplain; E. A. Faus, pianist; 
E. A. Spessard, Janitor; Amos Bomberger, assistant. 

Calendar for June 

June 2 — Graduate recital, Miss Lucile Mills. 

June 2 — Ball game, Felton A. C. 

June 4 — Graduate recital, Miss Lizzie Moyer. 

June 8 — Junior oratorical contest. 

June 9 — Ball game, Villanova. 

June 9— Play, " As You Like It." 

June io — Baccalaureate sermon. 

June io — Campus prayer meeting. 

June ii — Art exhibit. 

June ii — Freshman-sophomore base ball game. 

June 1 1 — Conservatory commencement. 

June 12 — Board meeting. 

June 12 — Alumni banquet. 

June 13 — College commencement. 

June 13 — Class day exercises. 

June 13 — Annual conservatory concert. 

Special Rates to Commencement 

Special railroad fares have been secured for the fortieth anniversary 
and commencement through the passenger department of the Trunk 
Line Association. " Fare and one-third for the round trip from trunk 
line points in Pennsylvania, east of and including Erie, Oil City and 
Pittsburg, on card orders, tickets to be sold and good, going June 8 to 



THE FORUM 



189 



13, and returning to June 15 inclusive." In order to secure these rates, 
application must be made to the college for card orders. ' ' Also fare and 
one-third on certificates from central passenger points in Pennsylvania, 
east of Erie, Oil City and Pittsburg. Each of your members when 
purchasing regular one-way tickets from such points to Annville should 
ask for a central passenger certificate, which upon being endorsed by 
you at the meeting, will be honored by the agent at Annville for return 
ticket at one-third fare." We are anxious that our far away friends 
should clearly understand this arrangement. 

College Notes 

On Saturday evening, April 28, the College Glee, Mandolin and 
Guitar Clubs gave a very interesting concert. The proceeds from the 
sale of tickets were given to Mr. Joseph Miller, who sustained a very 
heavy loss in the recent fire. 

The selections given were chosen from the best numbers of last 
year's and this year's programs. "Yachting Glee," "Rendemeer's 
Stream," and others were given by special request. The clubs appeared 
at the their best, and the large audience showed both the appreciation 
of the people of Annville for the work of the college boys, and also their 
desire to aid materially in lightening the burden of loss in the destruc- 
tion of the large building and furniture establishment of Mr. Miller. 

Great credit is due to the boys who so cheerfully sacrificed their 
time, and gave many of their pleasure hours to practice, in order that 
the efficiency of the clubs might be an honor to the college. Professor 
Jackson to whom the success of these clubs largely depends, is to be 
highly commended for the success of this last concert, as well as for the 
uniformly successful season, which has just closed. 

Thursday evening, May 10, an additional number of the star course 
was held at the college. Through the efforts of the general excitement 
bund, Senior Powowski and his trained bear, Mac, were secured for the 
instruction and entertainment of the students. The concert occurred in 
front of the Ladies' Hall. The hurdy-gurdy was turned by ' 'some kids, ' ' 
who had climed over the back fence. First there was a wedding, and 



I 



190 THE FORUM 

amid the strains of Mendelsohn's famous "Nobody works but father," 
Simon conducted his bride to the alter. The kid, father of the bear, 
gave away the bride, and the fighting parson performed the ceremony. 
Next came the dance in which the bear caught a broom like an "old 
leaguer. ' ' Last of all the bear started on the run for the kitchen and 
had to be shot. It tumbled over and growled, " Ouch my side. Whose 
throwin the boquets?" A silver offering was taken to buy cheese 
sandwiches for the bear and his master. 

The new officers of the sophomore class are J. Lester Appenzellar, 
president; S. B. Long, vice-president; Miss Alice Zuck, Secretary; S. R. 
Oldham, treasurer. 

Lebanon Valley professors are in demand as commencement orators. 
On the evening of May 31, Rev. J. T. Spangler, professor of Greek, 
delivered the annual address at the Bismarch High School commence- 
ment. Professor H. H. Shenk at the head of history and political 
science, was the commencement orator at the Shaefferstown High School 
exercises, Saturday, May 26, and at Hummelstown, May 31. 

Four delegates to Northfield have been elected by the Y. M. C. A. 
They are Park F. Bsbenshade, '07, K. M. Gehr, '07, S. B. Long, '08, 
and C. W. Shoop, '09. 

Andrew Bender was the first senior to obtain a position after gradu- 
ation. He has been elected to the head of the department of science of 
the Plainfield High School, New Jersey, at a high salary. 

About forty-five students and professors saw Robert B. Mantell in 
King Lear, at Lebanon, May 16. The students had a special car going 
to, and returning from, Lebanon. In the third scene of the first act, 
the faculty and students sent up to Mantell a bouquet of four dozen 
carnations. That Mantell is succeeding in interpreting Lear as no other 
man could is a well known fact. He was at his best at Lebanon. The 
cast as a whole was strong, and gave an excellent presentation of King 
Lear, although it is considered the most difficult of Shakespeare's plays 
to act. 

Football Manager Ksbenshade, Y M. C. A. President, Gehr and 
Riland saw the game at Lancaster with Franklin and Marshall. 



THE FORUM. 



191 



Miss Grace Brinkerhoff, the state student secretary of the Young 
Women's Christian Association, was here from April 30 until May 2. 
She met the various Y. W. C. A. committees and gave them many help- 
ful thoughts and suggested new plans for their work. There was, also, 
held a Silver Bay rally, at which talks were given by the girls who have 
been to Silver Bay. They are Misses Harnish, Myers and Knaub. 

Miss Brinkerhoff' s visit was a source of inspiration and help. The 
young ladies wish her success in her work among other colleges. 

Miss Bess Eckenroth and Miss Barbara Light, of Lebanon, Mrs. 
Cunkle and Miss Ruth Creeps, of Harrisburg, Miss Pearl Lutz and Miss 
Enola Brandt, Miss Zug, of Lebanon, Miss Elizabeth Nissely, of Read- 
ing, and Miss Helen Weidler, of Derry Church, were among the 
strangers present at Philo Anniversary. 

Miss Ursula Knauss, Miss Blessing, Mary Gardiner, and Miss 
Mary Wolf and Mrs. Oberdick, of York, Mrs. Bukley, and Miss Helen 
Toomey, of Steelton, Miss Edna Baldwin, of Harrisburg, Miss Clare 
Markley, of York, Miss Minnie Duncan and Miss Sallie Klopp, of Ruh- 
land, were guests at the Girls' Dormitory on May the twelfth. 

Miss Ilisia Stengle, of Steelton, was the guest of her sister, Verna 
and Miss Owen and Miss Leininger, of Albright College, were the guests 
of Miss Owen on May the twelfth. 

Miss Edna Flencie and Miss Mabel Muk spent Sunday April the 
twelfth at the latters home, at Schaefferstown. 

Misses Lutz, Zeat and Freed gave a moonlight party in the night of 
May the fifth. Among the guests present were Misses Oberdick, 
Showers, and Richard of the college, Misses Lutz and Brandt, of Ship- 
pensburg, and Miss Rissely, of Reading. Messrs Kreider, Appenzellar, 
Lehman, Showers, Guyer, Lininger, Clippinger and Reese were also 
present. A camp fire was built and everybody seemed to have had a 
very pleasant time. 

The seniors have elected M. M. Hoover and R. G. Light as the 
committee on class day exercises. 

By giving a supper, the coeds raised about fifty dollars, which they 
have decided to use to improve the aesthetic appearance of the campus. 



I 



192 THE FORUM 

Nathan Kreider Reifsnyder had a piano put in his room, in the 
men's dormitory. 

Roy Brenneman was elected at a late date, captain of the reserve 
base ball team. 

Bovey Hall, who played a good game at centre on the basket ball 
team during the winter term, is now at Otterbein. He plays first base 
on the varsity base ball team. 

X X 

Base Ball 

May 5, the most interesting game of the season was played with 
Delaware College on the home field. The game lasted thirteen innings 
and was a battle from beginning to end, in which Reese and Willis were 
well supported by their team mates. Both pitchers showed splendid 
form, Reese striking out seventeen men and allowing four hits, while 
Willis struck out nineteen men and allowed eight hits. McAndrews had 
on his batting clothes. He made four hits, one of them a home run, 
which tied the score in the fourth. With a three base hit in the thir- 
teenth, he brought in the winning run. 

Saturday, May 12, the varsity was defeated by Susquehanna 
University by the score 6 to 2. The game was lost through costly errors 
at critical moments. 

Franklin and Marshall won from our team at Lancaster May 19, by 
the score 11 to 6. Reese started to pitch for Lebanon Valley, but he 
retired in the third inning on account of the weakness of his throwing 
arm. Pauxtis relieved him, and in five innings allowed Franklin and 
Marshall only one run. In the fifth, Guyer opened for a home run. 
In the sixth three successive three base hits by Buck, McAndrews and 
Shenk tallied three more. Two two base hits by Stehman and Waughtel 
scored another in the seventh, and in the eight McAndrews made the 
second home run for Lebanon Valley. 

Villanova had no difficulty to win against Lebanon Valley, at Villa - 
nova, May 26. The score was 11 to 2. Reese pitched a good, steady 
game for Lebanon Valley, but things broke well for Villanova, whereas 
Reese and his team mates had to play an up hill game. 



THE FORUM 



193 



In a seven inning game, the Academy gave the sophomore team 
a shut out. Brenneman struck out fourteen sophomore bats-men. The 
preps scored five runs. 

Anxious to retrieve their defeat of two years ago, the seniors 
challenged the juniors to another base ball game. The juniors accepted, 
and defeated the seniors by the score 4 to 2. The first score had been 

8 to 1. 

The Reserves were defeated by the Annville town team by the score 

9 to 7, but they won from the Lebanon juniors by the score 5 to 4. The 
Academy split even with the Lebanon Yannigans. The Academy won 
by the score 9 to 3 and lost by the score 16 to 25. 



Rensselaer \ 
/^Polytechnic^ 
Sfc* Institute, 

%f Troy, N.Y. 

I,ooal examination! DiOTided for. Send for • Catalogs* 

W. J. Baltzell, Class '84, 

Managing Editor of 

THE ETUDE, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Leading Musical Magazine in the United 
States. 



William H. Kreider 

CLASS OP 1894 

Attorney-at-Law 

S. E. Cor. Broad and Chestnut Sts., 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

Standard Steam Laundry and 
Scouring Works, 
27 B. 7 Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

ALLEN F. WARD, Class of 1890, Prop. 

Prompt and Good Service Given. 



Lemberger's compound tar Lozenges 

IN BOXES— 25c, 10c and 5c. 

p SSly *? LEMBERGER & CO.'S PHARMACY, Lebanon, Pa. 



JOS. L. LEMBERGER, Ph. M. 



FRANK GLEIM Ph.G. 



|i | n|||T m f^lflfll Covnsv ]Iain and fflanheim streets, 

II I {NY J Annville, Penn a 

Uilll/ll 1 U 111 11 1 Hluiays has on Hand a Full bins of 

atflLiLt PAPEft 

AND LLUNDOcU SHADES 

Papep and Shade flanging a Specialty. 



I 



THE FORUM. 



TJhe Charm of Sndividuality 

97farks every portrait produced by 

Sates J Studio 



142 9?ortA 8th Street, 
0/seount to Students. 



jCebanon, tPenn'a. 

Special ttaies to Classes' 



FOR THE LATEST 
AND BEST IN . . . 



HATS 



And MEN'S 
FURNISHINGS 

to Erb & Craumer 

777 Cumb, St„ LEBANON 



$. m. $ftenr$ 
Bakery 

Has always on hand 

Tre$b Bread, gake$ ana Rolls 

ANNVILLE, PA, 

One door west of Pennsylvania House. 



R Complete fllusie Sto^e 

PIANOS, - - - ORGANS, 
VIOLINS, - GUITARS, * MANDOLINS, 
BANJOS, SHEET MUSIC and BOOKS. 

Musical Goods of all kinds at Lowest Prices. 
Phonographs and Graphophones from $io to $50. 
15,000 Edison and Columbia Records to select from. 

fllillet* Origan and Piano Co. 

738 Cumbefland St., IiBBflfiOfi, PR. 

FfiCTOHV—Bighth and maple Sts. 



Jacob Sargent, 

merchant f ailpr 

STYLE, FIT and WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED. 



1*20 OP. main St., Jlnnville. 



IF IN WANT OF 

Books, Stationery, 

FOUNTAIN PENS, FINE WRITING 
PAPER, FANCY GOODS, ALBUMS 
TOILET CASES, CALENDARS, CARDS 
GAMES, PURSES, HOLIDAY GOODS 
or anything kept in an up'to'date Book 
Store, call or write 

D. P. Witmeyer's Book Store, 

21 S. 8th St., LEBANON, PA. 



THE FORUM 




Weddings 



DIETRICH'S, 



OUR SPECIALTY 1015 N. Third Street. 225 Market Street. 

Fancy Ices, Cakes, Confections ' Harrisburg, Pa. 



Shipped Anywhere. 



Correspondence Solicited. 



H nville €lw ric Daw 



Electric Light Electric Wiring 

Electrical Supplies 

of every description 

ANNVILLE, 7 , PA. 

Dr. Harry Zimmerman 
Dentist 

Reductions to Students 
72 West Main St., Annville, Pa. 

JOSEPH MILLER, 
Furniture and Undertaking, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Harvey L. Seltzer 

(Formerly with Isaac Wolf) 
Strictly One-Price 

Clothier 

769 Cumberland St., LEBANON, PA. 

FOR SALE 

One subscription to Hapgood's Indus- 
trial Agency. See 

Manager of Forum 



. S. SHOPE 

Queensware 
Groceries _ Hardware 

LADIES' and GENTS' 

Furnishings 

Discount to tudents 

West Main St., Annville, Pa. 

JOSEPH G, KELCHNER 
Butcher 

Daily Meat Market of home dressed meats 

Also a full line of Smoked Meats. 
Annville, * c Pa# 

W, C, WOOLF 

Groceries and Provisions 

65 East Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 

Stephen Hubertis 



320 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 



Contents 



Sir William Herschel 


. 193 


Football Schedule for 1 906 . 


197 


Characteristic Parisian Cafes 


. 198 


Our Welfare .... 


200 


Bits of Hymnal History . 


. 201 


A Smile ..... 


203 


Editorial . 


. 204 


As You Like It ... 


207 


The Junior Oratorical Contest . 


. 209 


Synopsis of Commencement . 


209 


Baccalaureate Sermon 


. 210 


Dr. Reed's Address 


211 


Conservatory Commencement . 


. 212 


Class Day Exercises . 


212 


Alumni Reunion and Banquet . 


. 213 


Changes in Faculty . 


213 


Commencement Oration , 


. 214 


College Notes 


215 


Base Ball . 


. 216 


Alumni Notes .... 


216 




THE FORUM. 

Volume XIX. JUNE, 1906 Number 9 

Sir William Herschel 

HE great dome of the sky filled with glittering stars is doubtless 
one of the most sublime spectacles in nature. Some stars shine 
with a clear, vivid light, perpetually changing and twinkling ; 
others more constant, beam softly and tranquilly upon us, while 
many just tremble into our sight like a wave that is struggling to reach 
some far off land and dies as it touches the shore. In the midst of such 
weird and wondrous beauty, the tenderest sentiments of the heart are 
stirred. A feeling of awe and reverence, mingled with a thought of 
God comes over us, and awakes the better nature within us, while the 
soul asserts its immortality more strongly than ever. 

Man has beheld the heavens since his creation. Poets of all ages 
have sung their praises. Job three thousand years ago praised God as 
the creator of the Bear, Orion and the Pleiades. Peoples of all ages have 
been appalled by the portentous eclipse, the shooting star, and the comet. 
Today we see in the occurrence of these phenomena the operation of very 
simple laws of nature. We know the distances of many of the fixed stars 
and of all of the planets. Astronomy has computed the size, mass, days, 
seasons and many of the physical features of the planets, made an accur- 
ate map of the moon, tracked many of the comets in their immense side- 
real journeys, has discovered that the entire solar system is moving 
through space with known velocity toward a point in the Constellation 
Hercules, and has finally analyzed the structure of the sun and stars and 
announced to us the very elements of which they are composed. Whence 
comes this knowledge as if from the Creator of the Universe himself ? 
From a comparatively few men who have pursued knowledge for the sake 
of knowledge, to none of whom we are more indebted than to Sir William 
Herschel, the greatest practical astronomer, and one of the most profound 
philosophers whose achievements are and will remain the glory of 
England. 



194 



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Men in general pursue knowledge for very definite ends. They may 
do it to increase their earning power. The)" ma}- do it to attain the social 
distinction that usually accompanies a breadth of learning, or they may 
pursue knowledge for the sake of knowledge, for the intellectual pleasure 
it brings, for the sublime purpose cf thinking after God the thoughts of 
God. Sir Wm, Herschel was distinctly of this last type. Hew T as born in 
Hanover, Germany, in 1738, and was brought up in an atmosphere of 
music, his father, brothers and himself being talented musicians. But, 
as in the case of many other of the world's greatest geniuses, the 
environment in which Herschel was born was not the one in which he 
was to reveal his greatness. He went to England at the age of nineteen. 
His remarkable musical talent swept everything before him. Within 
four years he was director of one of England's finest concert companies, 
the one that entertained Loudon's wealthy and aristocratic population in 
its gay life at Bath during the summer months. 

Natural gifts alone do not make a great man. They did not make 
William Herschel the great astronomer he afterwards became. The 
European Magazine for 1785 says of him, that, although he loved music 
to excess, he yet determined with enthusiasm to devote every moment he 
could spare from business to the pursuit of knowledge, which he regarded 
as the sovereign good, and in which he resolved to place all his views of 
future happiness in life. Herschel is perhaps one of the best examples 
the w T orld has ever known of a man whose life was permeated by a domi- 
nant purpose. As a boy William learned from his father to distinguish 
the constellations. There was something fascinating about them that only 
grew in intensity as he approached manhood. Out of his first pay in 
England he bought a copy of Furgersou's astronomy. A new world was 
revealed to him. He resolved to learn the construction of the heavens. 
This became his definite purpose throughout life. He searched Europe for 
a telescope, but only to learn that there was none of so large a size made. 
If necessary he would spend half of his life time in perfecting a gigantic 
telescope that he might, during the remainder of it, enjoy reading the 
mysterious scroll of the heavens, solving the problem of the stars with 
their magnificent retinue of worlds. With patient zeal he succeeded in 
improving upon the small Newtonian telescope. There was no delay, no 
rest. The art of making reflectors was steadily advanced until he had in 
his hands the forty-foot telescope. These were years of unremitting 
toil, but toil the reward of which was the ecstatic delight of knowing. 



THE FORUM 



195 



Herschel was not yet attracting attention. While Europe was being 
rent by civil strife and France seemed to be ebbing out her very life 
blood in the French Revolution, William Herschel, unobserved by the 
world, was pursuing his one purpose, to learn the construction of the 
heavens. He resolved never to pass by any, even the smallest portion of 
the heavens without careful investigation. As a result of this careful 
scrutiny, Europe was in 178 1, startled to learn of the discovery of a new 
planet, since named Uranus. Europe could well shower honors upon 
him, for the discovery had absolutely no parallel in history, all the other 
major planets having been known from time immemorial. 

Herschel' s first review of the heavens resulting in his first star cata- 
logue was the greatest work of its kind yet accomplished. It required 
four years of observation, during which time there was not a single clear 
night that he was not behind his telescope from dusk until dawn. His 
four reviews of the heavens, his researches upon variable stars result- 
ing in the magnificent discovery of binary systems, his observations of 
the planets, his investigation upon the distribution of nebulae, his re- 
searches upon the construction of the sun, and measurements of star- 
distances for half a century held the attention of Europe. 

Herschel early saw the necessity of avoiding two extremes : That 
of forming conclusions with insufficient data to warrant them, and that 
of looking upon observation as an end in itself. Either course would 
defeat the very purpose of investigation. That Saturn has rings, that 
nearly all of the planets have satellites, that Sirius shines with a white 
light, while Arcturus has a soft red tint, that nebulous masses are found 
chiefly in the milky way, were points of significance only in their relation 
to other known facts. Just as Darwin solved the problem of the origin 
of species and showed how all existing forms of life have developed 
from pre-existing forms, so Herschel would show how, through a 
process of evolution the suns have developed from earlier stellar 
types and thus enable us to form some intelligible conception of how 
the universe has come to be what it is. He did not reach entirely 
satisfactory conclusions. A human life time is too short to solve this 
the most stupendous scientific problem with which the human intellect 
has ever attempted to grapple. 

William Herschel was no dreamer ; he was no theorist. Just as 
surely and accurately as we hundreds of times draw conclusions from 
known facts, conclusions that must inevitably follow, so Herschel, with 



I 



196 THE FORUM 



a body of facts gathered through a long life time of untiring, animated 
observation, found these facts leading him on to inevitable conclusions. 
He liked to think of the heavens as a great garden in which there are 
flowers in every possible stage of development. Some are budding, 
others blossoming or blooming, while some are fading and decaying. In 
this great garden only a single cluster is now unfolding, our solar system, 
and in this cluster there is but a single flower in bloom, our own earth. 
And the very same law that condemns the flower by the roadside 
just as surely dooms the earth to fade and decay. 

Two great problems absorbed Herschel's attention during the last 
twenty years of his life. He early suspected a motion of the entire solar 
system through space. Later in life through repeated observation on 
thousands of stars he proved it. This discovery of Herschel was not 
generally received. Modern astronomers confirm it, the motion and dir- 
ection being known as surely as that of the earth itself. Whether or not 
it would be accepted was of little consequence to Herschel. He might 
well have said, as did Kepler on his death bed, seeing some of his works 
rejected and unpublished, lying before him. "The die is cast. The 
book is written, to be read now or by posterity, I care not which. The 
world may well wait a hundred years since the Creator has waited six 
thousand years for an observer." 

The last great problem to engage Herschel's attention was the shape 
of the universe. As he improved the telescope, he was able to penetrate 
farther and farther into space. Each enlargement of the telescope 
brought more and feebler stars into the field of vision. With his giant 
telescope turned toward the milky way there were countless myriads of 
faint stars just trembling into sight. This was true only of the milky 
way, or galaxy. With the telescope turned towards the poles of the 
Galactic Circle the appearance was different. He actually could see 
through the stratum of stars into starless space beyond. His researches 
upon the Galactic Circle and nebulae within it are some of the most re- 
markable investigations ever made by man. 

The father man pursues knowledge, the more clearly he sees that 
all branches of learning are linked together. He is impressed with the 
harmony that pervades it all. Herschel has extended our knowledge to 
a wider sphere and has shown us the divine harmony, the sublime 
coordination in the entire universal. We see through it all one God, 
one law, one far off divine event toward which the whole creation moves. 



THE FORUM. 



197 



I like that beautiful thought of Oersted, which holds that man will 
continue adding to his knowledge, rearranging, classifying and general- 
izing until he conies to a final generalization which will be the thought 
of God. If any one investigator of the eighteenth century deserves 
more honors than others for leading us towards that supreme thought, 
let us give them to Sir William Heerschel. 

He spent his last days upon the seashore of England. There with 
fevered brow he looked out wistfully upon the deep sea's changing 
wonders, on its distant sails whitening the morning light, on its restless 
waves rolling shoreward to break and die beneath the noon day sun; on 
the red clouds of evening arching low to the horizon, on the serene and 
majestic pathway of the stars. Let us think that his dying eyes read in 
the sea below and the stars overhead a new meaning that only the part- 
ing soul may know. Let us believe that in the silence of the receding 
world, he beheld the starry light of a further shore and felt already upon 
his wasted brow the breath of the eternal morning. 

Andrew Bender, '96 



3T X 



Football Schedule for 1906 

Football Manager Esbenshade has scheduled the following games 

for 1906: 

September 22, State, at State. 
September 29, Dickinson, at Carlisle. 
October 6, Franklin and Marshall, at Lancaster. 
October 13, Susquehanna, at Annville. 
October 20, Gettysburg, at Gettysburg. 
October 27, Williamson, at Annville. 
November 3, Mt. St. Marys, at Emmetsburg. 
November 10, Muhlenburg, at Annville. 
November, open, at Annville. 



198 THE FORUM 

Characteristic Parisian Cafes 

ARISIAN public houses where liquid refreshments are served 
take many names, of which cafe is the most general and most 
comprehensive. A ' ' brasserie " is a cafe where beer is made 
a specialty. 

"Caharet" is the old fashioned, but still used word meaning a 
place where both food and drink are sold. Then there are the popular 
names not recognized by the standard dictionaries as " caboulet," 
" broussingot," or "bouchon," meaning a low cafe having the attraction 
of music and singing. Such establishments are to be found in Paris by 
the tens of thousands, and they are constantly increasing. 

People do not go to the cafe to drink, but to read the papers and 
to talk. The Frenchman has the privilege of spending at least six hours 
in the cafe on the condition of ordering a cup of coffee, or a thimble full 
of " absinthe." He does not go to the cafe because he wants to drink 
neither does he drink because he is thirsty. He simply drinks that he 
may go to the cafe. 

Each cafe it seems has its own particular kind of professional men 
as frequenters. For example, at the cafe Americane congregate poets, 
novelists, library men and painters, who indulge in " apertifs " cigaretts 
and small talk. At the Cafe Riche the financiers and stockbrokers out 
number the literary men, who in former days predominated, when 
Offenbach, Clement, Lauriere, Wolff, About and others were frequenters 
of a particular round table. On the opposite side of the boulevard from 
this is the cafe du Helder, the rendevous of military and naval officers. 
Here it is that the officers on their brief visits to Paris spend the time. 
They are always sure of meeting a friend and perhaps have the oppor- 
tunity to discuss the latest promotions, or the newest reforms evolved 
by the Minister of War. However, the frequenters of this place are not 
all military, or naval men. Many are of that class of people who have 
a particular liking for anything military. 

Perhaps the most interesting cafe in all Paris is the cafe de la paix . 
This is the rendevous of the gilded youth of Paris, and the rich strangers. 
Here are gathered at small tables on the pavement representatives of all 
nations. Brazilians scintilating with diamonds; Englishmen conspicuous 
for their strange head gear and light colored clothes; Chinese in radiant 
silks; Arab shieks, who »mar the majesty of their turbans and burnoose 




THE FORUM 



199 



by wearing yellow kid gloves stitched with black ; and in the midst of 
this cosmopolitan company the young French " dude " sucks the handle 
of his cane. 

At the cafe de Madrid may be seen the members of the radical 
newspaper press intermingled with business men and miscellanious idlers. 
The cafe de Madrid was formerly an exclusive political head quarters. 
Now it is a noisy cavern, where the voices of the talkers rise with 
difficulty above the clatter of the dominoes which are incessantly shaken 
on the marbel tables, or the rattling of dice on the numberless back 
gammon boards. 

At the cafe de Suede the habitues are lyric and dramatic artists. 
Next door is the cafe des Varietes, which was the favorite resort of 
Rochefort, Murger, Barriere and other vaudevillists and play rights. 
Further east along the boulevard the cafes become less and less elegant, 
but more and more crouded and noisy. The German beer shops with 
their baskets of "bretzel" become more frequent as one approaches the 
Boulevards des Sephastopal and Strashoache where there is much billiard 
playing, domino playing and card playing. 

As for the life of the Parisian cafe it is much the same all over the 
city. In the morning a few homeless people enter the cafes to drink 
their coffee and milk. Before lunch some customers come to take their 
" apertifs" and to read the morning papers. Toward five o'clock, the 
tables begin to fill and the crowd thickens until seven. During the 
dinner hour there is a lull, and then towards nine o'clock the tables fill 
once more, and the activity continues until one, or two o'clock in the 
morning, when the cafes are closed in accordance with the police 
regulations. 

Since the exhibition of 1867, when German, Swiss, English, 
Austrian and Hungarian barmaids were first seen in Paris, the waiters 
have been gradually supplanted by waitresses in many of the beer saloons 
of the Latin quarter, and that strange institution called Brasserie a 
femmes has spread all over Paris and at the same time it has become the 
custom to fit up the beer saloons in quaint and fantastic styles, and 
costinue the waitresses as Opera Comique nurses. 

The cafe in itself being a tiresome and unpleasing place, there is 
no objection to be made to costume, or any wierd decoration which 
makes the whole a spectacle very pleasing to the eye. The spirit of the 
Renaissance has entered so much into the civilization of the nineteenth 



200 



THE FORUM 



century, and the collecting and verifying of the styles of the past has 
advanced so greatly that a subtle analyst has said that the last century 
has forgotten to create a style of its own, so the son of a provincial 
bourgeois, who has just arrived in the capital, finds himself sitting in a 
beer saloon at a Renaissance table, drinking out of an imitation Venetian 
glass and regretting that the view of the movement of the street is 
hindered by the painted mediaeval windows. And so there is no more 
curious excursion to be made in Paris than a rapid visit to the queer 
cafes and brasseries of the Latin quarter. 

Park F. Esbenshade, '07. 

Our Welfare 

HAT IS our welfare ? Who promotes it and when will we 
see its zenith ? 

Any one conversant with history knows that national 
greatness always followed a great intellectual and moral 
vigor, while a prolonged epoch of moral decadence always caused the 
downfall of nations. 

If we were today to visit the countries once occupied by the most 
powerful nations of antiquity, they would remind us of some of our 
country grave yards, where a few monuments rise above a wilderness of 
weeds and briers. 

We should behold the pyramids and other structures towering above 
the general desolation as monuments to the genius of the ancestors of 
the present craven inhabitants and amid all the ruin and depravity we 
should be taught with mute, but impressive eloquence, the sad lesson 
that unless, we as a nation would share a similar fate, we must emulate 
their virtues, but avoid their vices. 

A spirit of justice should characterize our course at home and our 
relations abroad. Powerful armaments will be of no permanent avail 
unless a righteous cause be behind our guns, while impregnable fortifica- 
tions, material of greatness, and all our internal improvements will not 
save us from ultimate dismemberment, anarchy or ruin, if we indulge in 
a career of injustice, wickedness and internal corruption. Our safety 
will lie in the improvement of the minds and hearts of our people. 

C. W. Winey, Special. 




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201 




Bits of Hymnal History 

UR literature is rich with those short lyric poems, which we call 
hymns, or sacred songs. We prize them dearly and feel their 
divine mission, but many of us do them irreverence by letting 
their past history remain unknown to us. 
Nevertheless, we are glad that there have been men who have made 
a record of the most striking incidents associated with these hymns, and 
that through these incidents an additional splendor of poetic force is 
given to them. Following are some striking anecdotes connected with 
our most popular English songs. 

There are very few songs more popular than "Nearer my God to 
Thee," and we would indeed feel that a spiritual and literary gem were 
lost, if this hymn should be denied us ; yet not a few were so ill pleased 
with it in the beginning, being the product of a Unitarian, that it was in 
great danger of failing to receive public sanction and of mutilation. The 
compilers of the Baptist Hymn-Book even secured the services of Rev. 
A. T. Russel to make it complete by verses of his own, as follows : 

"Christ alone beareth me, 
Where thou dost shine ; 
Joint heir he maketh me 
Of the divine. 
In Christ my soul shall be 
Nearest my God to thee, 
Nearest to thee !" 

Others changed "a cross" to "the cross", but the day of prejudice 
against it is past, and it will forever stand in God's kingdom as a mem- 
orial of its highly devoted author, Mrs. Adams, who was born February 

22, 1805. 

Another hymn, "My faith looks up to thee," has an interesting 
history connected with its production and publication. This hymn was 
written in 1830, but not published as a hymn till 1832. When written 
its author, Ray Palmer, was in the period between his college and 
theological studies, and a teacher in a ladies' school. He was at this 
time in very poor health, and was probably of a despondent spirit. At 
least he himself says in reference to the hymn, "I gave form to what I 
felt, by writing, with little effort, the stanzas. I recollect I wrote them 
with very tender emotion, and ended the last lines with tears." He 




202 THE FORUM 

then placed the manuscript in a pocket-book. About two years after 
this, Lowell Mason, the musician, asked young Palmer if he had a hymn 
Mr. Palmer at once thought of the manuscript in the pocket-book, and 
brought it forth. Three days after Mason had received the little poem, 
he met the author again and said to him' "Mr. Palmer, you may live 
many years and do many good things, but I think you will be best 
known to posterity as the author of " My faith looks up to thee." 

On contemplating the touching incident that occasioned Rev. John 
Fawcett to write "Blest be the tie that binds," one cannot help but be 
moved with the patheticalness of the incident. It was in 1773, after a 
few years of pastoral work in Yorkshire, that he was called to London 
to succeed the Rev. Dr. Gill. He had preached his farewell sermon in 
Yorkshire, and the day for his departure had arrived. The wagon that 
had been brought to his house stood with his fnrniture and books, and 
all was in readiness for leaving. The weeping parishoners began one by 
one to bid Rev. Fawcett and his wife good-bye. This pathetic scene 
was too much to bear, and, seating themselves on a packing box, both 
Rev. and Mrs Fawcett wept bitterly. "Oh John, John," said Mrs. 
Fawcett, I cannot bear this ; I know not how to go." "Nor I either," 
replied her husband; "nor will we go. Unload the wagons, and put 
everything in the place where it was before." The furniture and books 
were unloaded, matters were explained to the London congregation, and 
Rev. Fawcett remained at Yorkshire. It is said that it was in commem- 
oration of this event that Rev. Fawcett wrote this touching hymn. 

There is another hymn which I wish to mention as having a very 
pathetic history in its production. It is the familiar hymn, "Abide with 
me; fast falls the eventide." Rev. Henry Francis Lyte, the author, 
towards the end of his life was continually afflicted with ill-health. He 
sought health resorts, but of no avail. He continually grew weaker and 
weaker. It seemed as though his end were very near, when he once 
more for the last time appeared before his eager people to administer to 
them the Lord's Supper, and to speak some parting words. After the 
communion "the weary administrator dragged himself to his room and 
remained there a long time." At the close of that communion day he 
handed the hymn of eight stanzas to one of his relatives. The following 
two stanzas of this hymn are descriptive of the author's feelings, as for 




THE FORUM 



203 



him indeed, "heaven's morning was breaking and earth's vain shadows 
were fleeing." 

Abide with me ; fast falls the eventide ; 
The darkness deepens ; Lord with me abide. 
When other helpers fail, and comforts flee, 
Help of the helpless, oh, abide with me. 

Hold thou thy cross before my closing eyes, 
Shine through the gloom and point me to the skies ; 
Heaven's morning breaks, and earth's vain shadows flee 
In life, in death, O Lord, abide with me. 

Oliver Mease '09 



A SMILE 



A smile is only a little thing, 

Just the curve of the lips, you say, 

Yet a smile's the light of a cheerless night 

And the sun of a cloudless day. 

And smiles are the music of words we hear, 

And the life of the words we speak ; 

The doors that close on our secret woes 

The strength of a heart that's weak. 

A smile is only a little thing, 
Just the glint of a soul, that's all, 
Or the saving grace of a homely face ; 
And the grave of an anger'd thrall. 
A smile is a link in a golden chain 
The sign of the melting snow, 
The tender word that is seen, not heard, 
The " yes," or a spoken "no." 

A smile is only a little thing, 

Yet we thrive on the food it brings, 

It warms us through and it thrills us, too, 

With the joy of the song it sings. 

So sound the praise of a pleasant smile 

And speak with your lips and eyes 

For a word or jest's but a word at best, 

But a smile is a precious prize. 

—Margaret Berlin. 



204 THE FORUM 

THE FORUM. 

Vol. XIX. JUNE, 1906. No. 9 

Editor-in-Chief, 

A. W. H ERR MAN, '07. 

Associate Editors, 

EDWARD E. KNAUSS, '07 ETHEL MYERS, '07 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS : 
M. R. METZGER, '07 ERMA SHUPE, '08 

S. R. OLDHAM, 'o8 M. O. BILLOW, '08 

Business Managers : 

c. ray bender, '07, Chief. 
ASSISTANTS 

R. J. GUYER, '08 G. M. RICHTER, '09 

.. The Forum is published each month during the college year by the students of Lebanon 
Valley College. 

TERMS :— Subscription price, 50 cents a Year. Single copy, 10 cents. 

All business matter should be addressed to The Forum, Annville, Pa. : all literary matter to 
A. W. Herrman, Annville, Pa. 

Subscribers failing to receive The Forum regularly will please notify us promptly. 

Subscribers who have changed their residence would confer a great favor by notifying us of the 
change, giving both the old and the new address. We can not be held responsible for any irregularity 
if this is neglected. * 

Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., as second-class mail matter. 



Editorial. 

According to the college catalogue which only made its appear- 
ance in the early part of this month, several changes have been made in 
the curriculum. In philosophy, I/)tze's Microcosmus will be given 
again. The Microcosmus is a stiff course. Heretofore the prep Greek 
stopped at Xenophon's Anabasis. The plan was to give students a very 
thorough start and then do fast reading in the freshmen year. Experi- 
ence has evinced the fact that the freshmen year was crowded too much. 
On account of this, Homer's Iliad is now included in the Academy. 
French will be given in the freshmen year and will be continued through- 
out the whole college course of four years. Readings and reference work 
in the histories of English and American literatures are piled up higher 
and higher each year. A course in oratory and public speaking has 
been outlined. In order to graduate three years' work must be taken 
and a certain degree of efficiency attained. The subjects in senior econ- 



THE FORUM 



205 



omies have not been announced. Two of the alternating subjects, how- 
ever, will be given. There seems to be a demand among the students 
for a course in international law. Prof. Shenk is considering the advisa- 
bility of giving such a course in his department. 

The curriculum of Lebanon Valley compares very favorably with 
those of the best colleges in the country. It is more inclusive than 
those of other colleges that claim to rank higher than Lebanon Valley. 
Yet Lebanon Valley is proud of its curriculum and its corps of professors, 
even though its reputation is not commensurate with its capabilities of 
doing excellent work. 

Lebanon Valley's faculty is composed largely of young men with 
university training, who are working hard to achieve for themselves the 
highest possible success. In their efforts, they emulate as far as possible 
university professors and methods. In some courses nearly the same 
work is given that is offered by the best universities. Then the older 
men on the faculty, too, are enthusiastic. So far as practical work is 
concerned, Lebanon Valley offers the best that can be secured anywhere. 

* * * 

So i«ong as there will be commencement exercises, there will also 
be misunderstandings between students and college authorities concern- 
ing the admission to certain musical, or literary occasions. Some of 
these misunderstandings are excusable, but some of them are not. Seve- 
ral days before the last commencement, a notice was inserted in several 
newspapers that admission to the commencement of the department of 
music would be by ticket, and that tickets would be furnished gratuit- 
ously for the mere asking. No such notice appeared in any college pub- 
lication, nor was an announcement made to the students at chapel exer- 
cises. Nothing was said to the students directly until the Sunday of 
commencement week, when it was announced that the seating capacity 
had already been exhausted. Many of the students failed to get tickets. 

Under such arrangements people not associated with the college are 
preferred before the students. Such should not be the case. Some one 
blundered. The students wonder whether it is not possible to hold one 
commencement without some misunderstanding. 

4 s .jj ♦ 

The students of Lebanon Valley are loyal to their institution. 
They will not allow its banners to be trailed in the dust if they can help 



206 



THE FORUM 



it. Neither will they permit its name to be defamed, nor its marvelous 
growth to be impeded. The students will do every bit as much for the 
College as the College does for the students. They realize that the de- 
partments here are just as strong as anywhere else, and that is why they 
are averse to radical changes in the faculty. 

In the first place the students do not like to see the departments re- 
adjusted. Then they also regret the changes that have been made. 
This is putting it in a very mild form. Those whose work lies chiefly 
in the departments affected, declare that, unless thoroughly trained pro- 
fessors are secured to fill the vacancies, they will not return next fall. 

This is a very serious matter. The students' side of the question is 
herewith given, and it ought to elicit the consideration of the college 
authorities. The demands of the students dare not be ignored, for with 
them it is a matter of business. They pay for what they get and they 
demand the same returns next year that they have been accustomed to 
getting. 

On the other hand, in what way is the College concerned ? Let the 
vacancies be filled by any but well prepared men, and what will be the 
result ? In one year, the College would lose financially by losing students 
more than it could save in professors' salaries, and would that be all ? 
No. The standard of the departments would be impaired and that 
would mean a decline in general. 

With the courses that Lebanon Valley now offers, it is the height of 
foolishness to even suggest that the vacancies be filled with an inferior 
grade of professors. Such notions savor of fogyism. The arguments 
used for this most undesirable and inadvisable project are lame and the 
theory of it is diametrically opposed to progress. 

* * * 

About four years ago Maurice Brightbill, of Annville, obligated 
himself to provide the funds for the erection of a gymnasium. He built 
the foundation and that is all that has been done for several years. 
Through exposure to the elements, the walls have begun to decay. 
Timber and stone that had been left on the campus by Mr. Brightbill 
have been removed. These and other indications point to the fact that 
Mr. Brightbill does not intend to erect the college gymnasium. Yet, it 
seems that he does not have the courage to make his intentions known 
to the proper authorities. 



THE FORUM. 



207 



Mr. Brightbill 's subscription was only part of a general fund. When 
it was announced that the whole amount had been solicited, all the sub- 
scriptions came in, except the one for the gymnasium. In justice to the 
College and to his fellow subscribers, Mr. Brightbill is morally bound to 
pay over the amount of his subscription. 

There are no mitigating circumstances connected with this case. If 
Mr. Brightbill had suffered financial reverses, a respectable view might 
be taken of the matter. There are no such depressions apparent ; at 
least, one would not think so upon seeing the gentleman whirring by in 
his big touring car, or upon seeing him come down over the athletic field 
at the games and halting his automobile before the grand-stand as though 
it were on exhibition. The students of Lebanon Valley, as is the case 
at all Colleges, are the strongest and best quality of the communities 
from which they come. They are not easily hoodwinked. Mr. Bright- 
bill may get some pleasure out of his tantalizing, but the students reserve 
for him the opprobrium that he deserves. 

* * * 

Students of Lebanon Valley did a good thing recently when they 
decided to put forth an effort to have their institution represented in some 
intercollegiate oratorical, or debating, contest next year. Such a move- 
ment is worth the best offorts that our students can make. The sopho- 
more-freshmen debate was an undertaking in the right direction. 
Interclass debates and so forth naturally lead to intercollegiate contests. 
Let the students return next fall with a determination that Lebanon Val- 
ley shall be represented in these things as well as in athletics. 

As You Like It 

One of the very delightful events of the commencement festivities 
was the annual Shakesperean play. The play given this year was ' ' As 
You Like It, " perhaps one of the most difficult for student players to 
interpret. 

The play was admirably rendered and was most pleasing to a large 
audience. It would be a great satisfaction to the alumni in particular, 
if the annual concert could be changed to Saturday evening and the 
annual play given Wednesday evening, so that more of the "old grads" 
could see what the student body can do in this line. 



208 



THE FORUM 




Special mention should be made of Mr. Billow as "Touchstone, " 
which was quite up to the interpretation of many professional players of 
the same part. As a whole the cast was good. Mention should be made 
of Miss Knaub as Rosalind, Miss Adams as "Celia, " Miss L,utz as 
"Audrey, " Arthur Spessard as " Orlando, " J. Warren Stehman as 
"Jacques," Roy Guyer as "Adam, " and Warren Kaufman as " The 
Banished Duke ' ' . 

The staging was first rate, considering that the play is best given in 
the open air, and that at best the facilities of the Conservatory stage are 
not of the best. Mention should be made of the music given in connec- 
tion with the play. In particular, Miss Trovillo's playing was most 
artistic. 

The play, as a whole, was in every particular a success. The criti- 
cism to offer is that the action in some places was slow, owing to the fact 
that some of the players were not sufficiently familiar with their lines. 
Too much credit can not be given to Professor J. K. Jackson for his un- 
tiring efforts during the whole year, which he exerted to make this play 
a splendid success. 

The following is the cast : 

Orlando — Son of Sir Rowland de Bois Arthur Spessard 

Jacques — " The melancholy " J. Warren Stehman 

Oliver — brother to Orlando Clyde Emery 

Duke Frederick Stanley Oldham 

The Banished Duke J. W. Kaufmann 

Touchstone — A clown M. O. Billow 

Amiens — A lord Max F. Lehman 

Adam — Servant to Orlando Roy J. Guyer 

Le Beau — A courtier Edward Knauss Jr. 

Corin — An old shepherd Samuel B. Long 

Silvius — A young- shepherd John Leininger 

Charles— A Wrestler Charles Clippinger 

William — A country bumpkin Roger Hartz 

Rosalind — Daughter to banished Duke Neda Knaub 

Celia — Daughter to Duke Frederick Ano Adams 

Audrey — A country wench Alice Lutz 




Foresters — Messrs. Hodges, Herr, Flook, Hamilton, Hartman, Ham- 



bright, Weidler. 



J 



THE FORUM. 



209 



The Junior Oratorical Contest 

On Thursday evening, June 7, the juuior oratorical contest was held 
in the chapel. The program was as follows: 

Instrumental solo, Second Nocturne "Ley bach" Frank Hartman; 
Invocation, Prof John; "An Effete System," C. Ray Bender; Marche 
Triomphade, "Goria" Miss Margaret Berlin, Miss Verna Stengle; "A 
Silent Power," Elias M. Gehr; " A leourt of lemmon Sinse," A Vallick 
Herrman; Solo Selected, Miss Louise Oberdick; "The age of achieve- 
ment," Edward E. Knauss, Jr.; " Onr Cine Debt to the Past," Mamice 
Rutt Metzgar; Solo Selected, Arthur Spessard. 

The judges of the contest were Rev. J. W. Zuck, D. D., Rev. 
Witordlippel, Ph. D. and E. E. McCurdy, Esq. 

Mr. Metzgar was given first price, and Mr. Knauss second. All 
the speakers deserve prase both for their productions and for their 
delivery. The faculty entertained the juniors in the parlor of the girl's 
dormitory immediately after the program. A very pleasant evening was 
spent and all seemed to enjoyed themselves thoroughly. 

X X 

Synopsis of Commencement* 

Lebanon Valley College celebrated its fortieth anniversary in a very 
fitting manner with the usual class day and commencement exercises, art 
exhibition, conservatory concert and many other pleasing performances. 
The officers of the college aimed to make the fortieth anniversary a great 
success, and any one who was present could not deny the fact that com- 
mencement was very fittingly celebrated and one long to be remembered. 
The art exhibition was held on Monday afternoon from two to five, at 
which time the work in that department was displayed. The teacher 
and pupils must certainly be commended for their progress and fine 
showing. 

Tuesday afternoon the graduating class held their class day exercises, 
which were very interesting, attractive and unique. A special feature 
was the different recollections of their student life represented in four 
acts. Wednesday morning the usual commencement exercises were held 
at 10 o'clock. The orator of the exercises was Rev. A. E. Dunning, of 
Springfield, Mass, editor of " The Congregationalist, " who spoke in a 
pleasing and interesting manner. Immediately after dinner, several 



210 



The forum 



classes held reunions and at 2;^o the Varsity Alumni game took place. 
The former base ball stars of the college showed us that they still knew 
how to play ball and in an errorless game defeated the Varsity 4-3. 

Many members of the alumni association were present together with 
relatives and friends of the students. The annual alumni reunion was 
held Tuesday evening at which time the class of 1906 joined the associ- 
ation. The commencement exercises closed on Wednesday evening with 
the annual conservatory concert, which was given before a crowded house. 
This commencement was undoubtedly the most successful held in the 
history of the institution. 

Baccalaureate Sermon 

On Sunday morning President Funkhouser delivered the baccalaure- 
ate sermon to the members of the graduating class. At exactly 10:30 
o'clock, the members of the class of 1906 filed in and took their places. 
Dr. Zuck, of the United Brethren Church of Annville, conducted the ex- 
ercises. The student choir of some forty voices made the auditorium 
ring with the melody of " Holy, Holy, Holy, ". Two scripture lessons 
were read, the first by Dr. Keister, who chose part of the nineteenth 
Psalm, and the second by Rev. Delong, who read a portion of second 
Timothy. Bishop Mills followed the scripture readings with prayer, and 
the choir rendered a very pleasing selection. 

Dr. Zuck introduces President Funkhouser who, spoke on "The 
Making of a Man." His text was chosen from Philippians, the thir- 
teenth verse of the third chapter. ' ' This one Thing I do. " President 
Funkhouser emphasizes the inner spirit thrilled by the divine spirit as 
the measure of a man. 

There are some elements common in the characters of all great men. 
He must believe in his God, his cause and in himself. There is in every 
man's life two forces, God's providence and man's choice. 

The sermon was full of fitting illustrations aptly chosen from both 
sacred and profane history. The necessity of beginning life early and of 
being well trained for it was shown by the comparison of college and non 
college men. 

President Funkhouser spoke of the circumstances, which actuate 
men to high ideals. In each cause the highest ideal is faith in God and 
labor in the cause of great human usefulness. u Life, " he said, is not a 



THE FORUM 



211 



joke, nor is it all play: Let each one do the nearest duty. " The 
speaker closed with Longfellow's significant poem, " The Psalm of Life. " 

After the sermon the audience sang " All Hail the Power of Jesus 
Name ' ' and President Funkhouser pronounced the benediction. 

Dr. Reed's Address 

Sunday evening was devoted to services in behalf of the Y. M. C. A. 
and the Y. W. C. A. After a short devotional service lead by President 
Funkhouser, the speaker of the evening, Dr. Reed of Dickinson, was in- 
troduced. The subject of Dr. Reed's talk was" Enthusiasm." He 
spoke of a great enthusiasm for certain things as being characteristic of 
the American people, but he said that in the moral and religious duties 
there is entirely too little of it. In politics it would be expected that en- 
thusiasm would be great, but at the polls men must be urged and bribed 
in the exercise of their dearest privilege. Political robbery is brought 
about by this negligence on the part of the people to hold to their politi- 
cal rights. The country has been doing little more than marking time. 

In religions duties there is the same or even greater lack of enthusi- 
asm. The churches are wanting in that high and holy enthusiasm for 
God. They seem to be afraid to become enthusiastic, lest they become 
fanatical. The average man would be offended at the suggestion of his 
being an enthusiast, yet enthusiasm was the leading trait of many great 
men. 

Dr. Reed spoke of Guizot, of Edward Everett, of Daniel Webster, 
and Madame de Stael as defending enthusiasm. To be enthusiastic is 
not to be fanatic. A fanatic is a man tremendously excited and aroused 
over something of infinitesimal importance. An enthusiast is a man tre- 
mendously aroused and excited by something that is as great as the uni- 
verse of God. The difference is in the vastness of the idea. Many per- 
sons are not enthusiastic because enthusiasm is not the fashion. It is the 
fashion not to be moved and in half of the churches the people are dead 
because the sensibilities are dead. 

The heart should be red hot with energy and it should be got with 
profound thinking. We should get hold of the things that are clamoring 
for support and push them forward. No great cause that is inspired of 
God can result in failure. Open your hearts for the entering of the 
quickening spirit of God. The world needs brains, character, enthusiasm . 
The spirit of the age is summed up in the poem 14 Give Us Men." 



212 



THE FORUM 



Conservatory Commencement* 

Program : Mendelssohn—" Meerstile," Overture, Elizabeth Moyer 
and Lillian Snell; Handel—" Lascia chio Pianga, " Rinaldo, Buzzia— 
" Peccia," Gloria, Elsie Arnold; Godard— Bercuse, " Jocylyn," Batiste— 
Offertoire in D, Elizabeth Heister; Cui Caesar— Marche Solonelle, Mar- 
garet Berlin and Iva Maulfair; Gounod— " Nella Calma " " Romeo et 
Juliet, " Edith King; Liszt—" Orphee, " Symphonic Poem, Mae Berger 
and Irene Roberts; Rossini Cavatina " Bel Raggio " Semiramide, Lucile 
Mills; Kinder— Berceuse, Dubois— March, "Joan d' Arc," Lawrence 
DeWitt Herr. 

After the program, which was very well rendered, diplomas were 
presented to Elizabeth Moyer, Margaret Berlin and Iva Maulfair, in 
Piano ; Edith King and Lucile Mills, in voice ; L. DeWitt Herr and 
Lizzie Heister, in organ ; and certificates to Elsie Arnold, in voice ; Mae 
Berger, Irene Roberts and Lillian Snell, in piano. 

Class Day Exercises 

The class day exercises of the class of 1906, although not excelling, 
yet attained to the standard set by former classes. The president, 
Charles A. Fry, in his address first spoke briefly of commencement time 
and what it meant to the class. Then he praised the College and told 
how dear the memories of College days would be to them, the outgoing 
class. He gave a few words of advice to his class mates and ended by 
welcoming the friends to the exercises. 

The class history by Ora M. Harnish told of the early struggles of 
the class through the freshman and sophomore years and led up to the 
time when they became dignified seniors and were above class battles and 
could look back over their past record with pride. 

The drama, " Student Life," was presented in four acts. The first 
act represented the class in freshman elocution and they acted the parts 
well. Act two was the ' ' Sophomore-Freshman ' ' flag rush and, although 
this did not mean much to many, yet those who participated in the 
rush at that time were reminded of one of the fiercest fights in the latter 
years of the College. The " Junior Class Meeting " was a sort of mix- 
up of the happenings of both junior and senior years. Act four, " Senior 
Ethics," was appreciated by the students, but to the visitors and many 
of the alumni it was meaningless. 



THE FORUM. 



213 



The presentation by C. E. Shenk was one of the best numbers 
Every member of the class was presented with something that would 
help them in their life's work. The " roasts " were appreciated by all. 

X X 

Alumni Reunion and Banquet 

The annual alumni reunion and banquet were held on Tuesday even- 
ing. A business meeting preceded the gayety of the occasion. Dr. W. 
W. Brunner was elected president of the association and A. R. Clippinger 
vice president. Prof. S. H. Derrickson was elected treasurer and Miss 
Ella Black recording secretary. Rev. E. O. Burtner is the alumnal 

trustee. , 
After the business session, which was held in the assembly room ot 
the library building, the alumni proceeded to the Ladies' Hall, where 
a general good time occurred. Dr. Cyrus Harp, of Providence, Rhode 
Island, acted as toastmaster. Dean J. E. Lehman, Prof. N. C. Schlichter 
Alfred Mills, President A. P. Funkhouser and E. E. Snyder responded 
to toasts. Mr. Snyder was the spokesman for the '06 class. 

X X 

Changes in the Faculty 

A number of changes have been made in the faculty. Some of them 
came as a surprise to the student body. President A. P. Funkhouser 
was reelected for one year. Prof. J. T. Spangler was elected dean to 
take the place of Prof. J. E. Lehman. Dr. Benjamin E. Bierman, an ex- 
president of Lebanon Valley, was made treasurer in order that Treasurer 
W C Arnold may complete his graduate work at Columbia University 
next year Prof. Arnold in connection with his duties as treasurer 
taught sociology. Prof. B. F. Daugherty, who was the head of the 
Latin department and adviser of the freshmen, was given a leave of ab- 
sence Prof, and Mrs. N. C. Schlichter, heads of the departments of 
French and English respectively, and Miss Edith Baldwin, the art 
teacher resigned. The Schlichters have both accepted excellent posi- 
tions in a Massachusetts College. An effort is being made to retain 
them, but when The Forum went to press they had not yet consented to 
remain. The students just before going home circulated a petition to 
have the faculty committee of the board of trustees prevail upon them to 
reconsider their resignations. Owing to the late hour at which the an- 



214 



THE FORUM 



nouncement was made only a bare majority of the students got an oppor- 
tunity to sign the petition. 

In case the Schlichters refuse to remain, there will be four vacancies 
in the faculty to be filled by the faculty committee. The vacancies are 
in the departments of French, English, Latin and Art. 



3£ 



Commencement Oration 

Dr. A. E. Dunning, of Boston, editor of "The Congregationalist," 
was the commencement orator. In introducing him to the audience, 
President Funkhouser spoke in complimentary terms of the aid that the 
Congregationalist church has been and still is throughout the New 
England and other states to the extension of education. President 
Funkhouser also said that through the tri-church union, the people of 
the United Brethren and of the Congregationalist churches, will become 
more closely allied to each other. Dr. Dunning is the head of church 
polity of the tri-church alliance. 

In opening his speech, Dr. Dunning took a few moments to suggest 
what the United Brethren and the Congregationalist churches would 
share between them should the union become a reality. Dr. Dunning's 
theme was ' ' Surviving Ideals of Puritan Eife. ' ' He took the home life 
of Jonathan and Mrs. Edwards as an example to illustrate his chief line 
of thought. ' ' Jonathan Edwards," said he, « ' is the only American who 
is sure for a permanent place among great thinkers." Furthermore, he 
said that Edwards was the greatest philosopher of the eighteenth century, 
but his philosophy has been supplanted. Dr. Dunning held up Edwards 
not for the great things that he did, but for doing the ordinary things of 
life so as to make of him an ideal type of manhood. His address 
embraced four main thoughts. The were the ideal christian home life, 
the ideal spiritual being, the ideal or independent man, and the family 
heritage. For the ideal christian home life, he referred to that of the 
Edwards as being typical of the Puritans. The ideal spiritual being is 
the true christian man and the ideal man is he who is an independent 
man. The family heritage is not merely posterity, but the character of 
that progeny. During the summation of his ideas, he declared that a 
man who has not one of those ideas developed into reality has a meagre 
life. 



THE FORUM. 215 

College Notes 

President Funkbouser entertained the senior class at the Ladies' 
Hall on Friday evening, June 8. The President is a genial host. 

Dr. Faust, of the United Brethren Union Biblical Seminary, at Day- 
ton, spent several days at the college a week before commencement. 

Copies of the Junior annual were on sale during commencement. 
The book is substantially made and is very neat and attractive. It is a 
breezy uumber, reflecting the bizarre characteristies of student life at 
Lebanon Valley. Nevertheless, it does not omit the sober side of stu- 
dent life. The copies are going rapidly, yet there are quite a number 
on hand. 

The spring athletic election was held in the first week of June. The 
managers elected are A. W. Herrman, baseball manager; M. O. Billow, 
assistant; S. R. Oldham, basketball manager; and R. J. Geyer, assistant. 

The seniors, although they are now alumni, were defeated in base 
ball by the sophomores by the score 6 to o. Hambright pitched a fine 
game for the seniors, who were unable to connect with Oldham's delivery. 
Hambright struck out fourteen men in seven innings. 

On Sunday evening of commencement week, an open air meeting 
was held by the Y. M. and the Y. W. C. A's. The meeting was largely 
attended. As usual, the seniors, who are most religiously inclined, occu- 
pied the greater part of the time in giving their experiences with either 
the one or the other organization. Dr. Zuck, the college pastor, com- 
plimented the students in general for their faithful attendance at church 
services. Profs. John and Daugherty also spoke. 

Th^ art exhibit was held in the art room from two to five on Mon- 
day afternoon It was one of the most pleasing exhibits ever held here. 
The china was the largest and finest part of the year's work. The work 
of the preparatory students was very interesting, as was also the work in 
water colors of the older pupils. 

Alfred Mills, '04, banquetted his class mates, who were here for 
commencement, at his home on East Main street, on Tuesday afternoon. 
John I. Shaud acted as toastmaster. The toasts were, "Passing of class 
of 1904 " by Nelle C. Reed ; "Reminiscences, " by Alfred Mills ; "Some- 
thing not learned in College," by Mary Anna Light ; " Class Phrophecy 
fulfilled and unfulfilled," by William Riedel. 



R 


H 


O 


A 


E 


1 


1 


7 


3 











4 


2 





1 


1 


3 


3 








1 





























2 














1 

















13 























2 


6 


27 


8 






216 THE FORUM 

Base Ball 

On commencement day an interesting game of base ball was played 
between the 'Varsity and a team representing the alumni. The game 
resulted in a victory for the alumni by the score of 3 to 2. The 'Varsity 
were unable to hit Shenk when hits meant runs. The score : 
ALUMNI R H O A E 'VARSITY 

a&^L-.u 1 2 12 2 Pauxtislb 

Albright lb 2 19 10 Oldham 2b 

Hambrightcf 1 McAndrews ss 

g h enk p 1 5 Geyer cf 

£°n n |u 4 Ludwiglf 

Mills 3b 2 StehmSnrf 

Arndt2b 2 3 Albert 3b 

S" y lf . 1 Waughtel c 

Rummer rf Reesi p 

Batdorfcf 

Totals ; ~i ~5 21 Is" ~ T ° tals 
Alumni 20100000 0-3 

'Varsity 00200000 0-2 

On Saturday, June 2, the 'Varsity easily defeated Felton A. C, of 
Steelton, by the score 11 to 2. Carnes pitched a good game and had 'the 
visitors well in hand at all times. Pauxtis fielded and batted in his 
usual clever style. The score by innings: 

Lebanon Valley 00060023 x— n 
Felton AC 00020000 0—2 

Alumni Notes 

D. J. Cowling, '02 is a regular professor in the Yale summer 
school for 1906. 

John H. Maysilles, '95, was granted the degree of M. E. at Purdue 
University this year. 

P. M. Spangler, '06 expects to attend Crozer Theological Seminary, 
at Chester, next year. 

D. D. Brandt, '04, is in Oakland, Cal., training for Evangelistic 
work. 

Edna Engle, '04, received her A. M. from Columbia University this 
June. 

Walter Clippinger, '99, of Dayton, is taking work at the Chicago 
University summer school. 



THE FORUM 217 

Walter R Kohr, 'o 4> professor of sciences at St. Charles Military 
Academy, St. Charles, Mo., is now working in the Department of 
Biology and Chemestry at Chicago University. 

Ray G Light, '06, will enter business at Avon. 

J. B. Hambright, '06 has been elected principal of the New 
Providence High School New Jersey. a 

E E Snyder, '06, has been elected to fill the chair of Latin and 
German of Westerleigh Collegiate Institute, New Brighton, Staten 
Island 

Miss Ida Martin, '06, will teach German and English in the Vine- 
land High School, New Jersey. 

Andrew Bender '06, has been elected Professor of Sciences in the 
New Plainfield High School, New Jersey. 

Prof N C. Schlichter '97, has been elected to the head of the De- 
partment of English, and also dean of the faculty, of the International 
School Springfield, Mass. Mrs. Schl ichter will be instructor in English. 



Rensselaer % 
^Polytechnic^ 
SS a Institute, 
Troy, N-Y. 

l ^ M »»iMtion. WorldStar. 8«dfor«0»Uk>«»» 

W. J. Baltzell, Class '84, 

Managing Editor of 

THE ETUDE, Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Leading Musical Magazine in the United 
States. 



William H. Kreider 

CLASS OF 1894 

Attorney-at-Law 

S. E. Cor. Bread and Chestnut SU., 
PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



Standard Steam tawdry and 
Scouring WorRs, 
27 n. 7 Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

ALLEN F. WARD, Class of 1890, Prop. 

Prompt and Good Service Given. 



I omhprffpr £ COMPOUND TAR Lozenges 

IN BOXES— 25c, 10c and 5c. 

prepared lewibERGER & CO.'S PHARMACY, Lebanon, Pa. 

0NLY AT 

— - w ~. MrB , Coi.net. Main and Olanheim Streets, 

II1DDY I1PIIT Rnnville, Penn'a. 

ll 111 11 I LIU II I »l"">y» has on Hand a pull nine oi 
Paper and Shade flanging a Specialty. 



4 



THE FORUM. 



TJhe Charm of Sndividuality 

97?ar/cs every portrait produced 6y 

Sates J Studio 



142 TfortA 8th Street, 


jCebanon, iPenn'a. 


'Discount to Students. 


iSpeci'ai &?atffs to Classes 


FOR THE LATEST tJ w T p- 
AND BEST IN . , , (1H 1 5 


$. m. $ftenr$ 


And MEN'S 


Bakery 


FURNISHINGS 


Has always on hand 



to Erb & Craumer 



777 Cumb, St, 



LEBANON 



ANNVILLE, PA, 

One door west of Pennsylvania House. 



R Complete fllusie Store 

PIANOS, * * * ORGANS, 
VIOLINS, - GUITARS, - MANDOLINS, 
BANJOS, SHEET MUSIC and BOOKS. 

Musical Goods of all kinds at Lowest Prices. 
Phonographs and Graphophones from $io to $50. 
15,000 Edison and Columbia Records to select from. 

miller? Organ and Piano Co. 

738 Cumberland St., IiEBAflOfl, PA. 

FACTORY— Eighth and maple Sts. 



Jacob Sargent, 



STYLE, FIT and WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED. 



i$-20 W. main St., jfnntille. 



IF IN WANT OF 

Books, Stationery, 

FOUNTAIN PENS, FINE WRITING 
PAPER, FANCY GOODS, ALBUMS 
TOILET CASES, CALENDARS, CARDS 
GAMES, PURSES, HOLIDAY GOODS 
or anything kept in an~ up^tcvdate Book 
Store, call or write 

D. P. Witmeyer's Book Store, 

21 8. 8th St., LEBANON, PA.